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Report Card 2010

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Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Campus Survey

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With the publication of the College Sustainability Report Card 2010, more than 1,100 school survey responses from over 300 institutions are now available online. In total, these surveys offer more than 10,000 pages of data collected from colleges and universities during the summer of 2009 . To access surveys from other schools, go to the  surveys section  of the website. To see grades, or to access additional surveys submitted by this school, please click the "Back to Report Card" link at the beginning or end of the survey.

 

Name: Steven Lanou 
Title:
Deputy Director – Sustainability Program. EHS Headquarters Office
Date survey submitted:


ADMINISTRATION

SUSTAINABILITY POLICIES
1) Does your school have its own formal sustainability policy?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please describe and provide URL, if available: MIT has committed to advancing environmental sustainability through campus operations as well as through research and education. The Institute has an Environment, Health and Safety Policy that encompasses progressive sustainability principles including environmental stewardship, pollution prevention, and waste minimization across the institution. http://mit.edu/environment/commitment/index.html

2) Has the president of your institution signed the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment (ACUPCC)?
[ x ]  No: 

[  ]  Yes. If completed, please provide the date the GHG Report was submitted to the ACUPCC:

3) Has your institution signed the Talloires Declaration?
[ x ]  No:
[  ]  Yes

4) Is there a sustainability component in your institution's master plan and/or strategic plan (check all that apply)?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes, in the master plan. Please describe and provide URL, if available: MIT is currently developing and drafting a key master plan through 2030. Sustainability is a key component of the plan and provides principles for guiding future physical development.
[ x ]  Yes, in the strategic plan. Please describe and provide URL, if available: Since 2001, MIT has been guided by a set of 11 core environmental stewardship goals, including:

  • Conserve energy, seeking continuous reductions in our per capita energy consumption
  • Reduce campus air emissions, including those from transportation, of greenhouse gases and regulated pollutants
  • Reduce material and resource consumption, including office and laboratory supplies and water
  • Increase the recycling and conservation of materials
  • Increase the use of recycled-content products
  • Reduce the volume of toxicity of our hazardous waste streams
  • Improve our indoor environment, including both the indoor air quality and the comfort and productivity of our work and living spaces, by considering sustainability in our design, operations, and maintenance policies
  • Improve the urban environment, including landscape quality and the site and pedestrian environment
  • Educate our students in sustainable concepts so that they may apply them in their professions
  • Support community-wide and regional sustainability efforts
  • Achieve a minimum of Silver from the US Green Building Council’s (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification for new buildings and major renovations


ADVISORY COUNCIL
5) Does your school have a council or committee that advises on and/or implements policies and programs related to sustainability?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes

If you answered "No" to question 5, please proceed directly to question 11.

6) Please provide the name of the committee and list the number of meetings held since August 2008.
Name: 1) a.  Campus Energy Task Force (meets monthly)
Number of meetings: See above

7) Please provide number of stakeholder representatives on the committee.
[#    ]  Administrators 13
[#    ]  Faculty 7
[#    ]  Staff  (included in administration)
[#    ]  Students 3
[#    ]  Other. Please describe:

8) Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents.
If 2009-2010 academic year information is not yet available, please provide information for 2008-2009 instead.
Name of chair(s): Leon R. Glicksman, Professor of Building Technology and Mechanical Engineering (co-chair); Theresa M. Stone, MIT Executive Vice President and Treasurer (co-chair)


Position(s) (e.g., administrator, faculty, staff, student):
Faculty; Administrator


9) To whom does the committee report (e.g., president, vice president)? President & MIT Energy Council

10) Please list key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2008.

Key issues/programs that the group has addressed/implemented since August 2008: See below.
Progress made on each of these issues since August 2008: See below.

 

Campus Energy Task Force 2008-2009

Task force advances host of campus energy projects that complement MITEI research and education activities and engage entire MIT community

The Campus Energy Task Force has been the catalyst for an unprecedented partnership between students, faculty and staff of the Institute to develop a robust campus energy program that is focused on discovering and adopting the best practices and technologies to address MIT’s own campus energy challenges. Task Force members include faculty from the 5 academic schools, representatives from key administrative offices and support staff, and both undergraduate and graduate students. A number of strategies to advance sustainable energy practices and reduce MIT’s energy use have been the result of research and collaborative projects involving students and faculty from many different schools at MIT and staff from administrative units, such as Facilities, Information Services and Technology, Housing, Travel, and Environment, Health and Safety.

This year, the Campus Energy Program has advanced the President’s vision of engaging the entire MIT community in MITEI activities. The Campus Energy Program has been designed to complement the research and education activities of MITEI and provide a focus and platform for engaging all students, staff, administrators, alumni, and local community members – community members who may not be engaged in formal research or education endeavors. The Task Force has supported a wide community of people – custodians, department heads, administrative assistants, research scientists, faculty, undergraduates, department staff et al. – to help MIT “walk the talk” on energy and sustainability. In addition, the Campus Energy Program has provided a rich opportunity to build awareness of MITEI in general across campus and allow many more people to engage with, learn from, and enrich MITEI in different capacities. 

The MIT Campus Energy Program has three goals:

  • Reduce MIT’s energy consumption and associated greenhouse gas emissions economically
  • Enhance student energy education and learning by using our campus operations as a living laboratory for discovery and innovation
  • Serve as a model of intelligent, effective actions to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions: a model that could be used by others in the US and worldwide

 

The Campus Energy Program is guided by these principles:

 

  • Comprehensive : utilities, transportation, computing, sustainable design, education; including both engineered and behavioral solutions
  • Inclusive : students, staff, faculty; focusing on multidisciplinary and collaborative problem-solving
  • Disciplined : sound ROI, portfolio approach; focusing on modeling best practices for global impact

 

This past year, the Campus Energy Task Force has advanced progress in several areas. Areas of focus include: facilities energy conservation & conservation funding, sustainable design, commuting, efficient computing, community participation, and student learning. Highlights include:

Energy conservation investment fund

MIT has advanced the pilot phase of the MIT Energy Conservation Investment Fund with $500,000 of seed capital provided by the MIT Treasurer to fund investments in energy efficiency across campus. The projects funded with this initial investment included monitoring and renewing steam traps, lighting upgrades, continuous commissioning and coil cleaning. Estimated annual cost savings from these projects approaches $1 million. The Treasurer committed to re-invest the savings achieved in the next round of projects that are underway.

An alumnus has recently added $500,000 to this fund. We have a gift from another donor for $1 million that will create an expendable fund for an agreed upon list of on-campus energy conservation and efficiency projects using proven technologies with rapid payback. The fund is intended to demonstrate that significant savings can be realized by effectively using proven technologies to save energy.  The savings will be measured and validated using generally accepted engineering standards for the technologies implemented.  MIT will use the savings from these projects to fund a second list of projects to further advance the Institute’s energy savings program.

Facilities energy conservation, efficiency and sustainable design

The Department of Facilities has made strong progress in designing and carrying out a series of measures to conserve energy and promote sustainable design. A few recent highlights include:

A continuous commissioning program (a program that monitors hundreds of key operating parameters to identify systems that are not operating properly) was carried out in the Dreyfus Chemistry Building (Building 18) and the Zesiger Sports and Fitness Center (Building W35). To date, measures with annual savings of $500,000 have been identified. Similar continuous commissioning programs are also being implementing in buildings E25, 68, 16, and 56. In building 68 alone, recent work has identified approximately $300,000 in annual savings due to pinpointing and correcting inefficiently operating HVAC system components.

Various lighting projects have been initiated. These include replacement of lamps and ballasts with more efficient versions, addition or improvement of lighting controls and fixture upgrades. Recent lighting measures in Dupont W32 (including fencing, wrestling, and squash facilities), W8 boathouse, and Building 34 elevator lobbies cost $80,000 and are estimated to return annual savings of $45,000. A Stata Center lighting program underway is expected to cost $520,000 and save approximately $160,000 annually. A new policy encourages custodians to turn off lights in offices and classrooms at the end of their shifts, resulting in fewer lights being left on around campus at the end of the day. A program to encourage turning off lights in labs is currently being developed.

In the recently completed PDSI project, an innovative and more energy efficient cooling system known as “chilled beams” has been successfully completed, commissioned and will set the standard for future renovations of other Main Group spaces. An estimated 300 ton reduction in chilled water demand has been achieved as well as an 110hp reduction in necessary fan horsepower.

New Ashdown House (NW35) is on track for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver certification with the possibility for Gold. This is the first MIT dorm to employ heat recovery from kitchen and bath exhaust systems as well as a highly efficient curtain wall system which allowed HVAC equipment of smaller than normal size to be selected. The Department of Facilities continues to fine tune the new systems to achieve even higher efficiencies. Like the Sloan School project, the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research design team has been using a version of the integrated design process in order to achieve a greener building that tackles lab energy use head on and challenges current rules of thumb for HVAC needs to improve system efficiencies.

The Housing Office partnered with the winners of the annual Dormitory Electricity Competition to develop energy efficient renovations within their residence halls.  Housing staff and students worked collaboratively to identify efficiency opportunities. With an annual prize of $10,000 given to the contest winning dorm, dormitories have received improved lighting and motion and heat sensors helping students gain a better understanding of their effect on the overall costs of energy. The 2009 competition saved MIT approximately 167.28 MWh of electricity – enough electricity to power 14 homes for an entire year.

Students and the Housing Office are collaborating with MITEI and other departments to install electricity meters in specific apartments to showcase effects of behavior on energy use and cost.

Campus Dining has initiated and deepened several programs to advance more sustainable dining practices and options, including: working with its food service providers to offer and celebrate more locally sourced and organic foods; promoting use of non-disposable serviceware, supporting Biodiesel@MIT to convert waste vegetable oil to biodiesel fuel; adopting more environmentally friendly dishwashing technologies; composting food prep waste; recycling wherever possible; and employing batch cooking and made-to-order food to reduce food waste.

Transportation & commuting enhancements

As transportation needs for the Institute comprise a significant source of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, the Task Force considers measures that can have favorable impacts on our campus fleet and commuting options and patterns.  MIT has a wide range of flexible, environmentally friendly and cost-effective options available to MIT commuters, details of which are available at http://web.mit.edu/facilities/transportation/ . These options help the MIT community to lower its carbon footprint as evidenced by the choices people make on how they commute to campus. The Parking and Transportation Office has focused recent efforts on programs that help those with the longest commute (commuter rail users) and those who drive full time. Some highlights of recent enhancements include:

To encourage drivers to try public transportation, MIT offered free transit passes for the month of September 2008 to employees who currently park at MIT five days per week. The community enthusiastically responded to this offer as evidenced by the fact that 708 drivers opted to participate.  In October 2008, 79 people switched to transit.

To help many who have some of the longest commutes and were not using commuter rail, MIT increased its subsidy of MBTA commuter rail passes for the month of October 2008 onward, up to 50% in all zones. This resulted in savings for nearly 600 members of the MIT community. Commuter rail sales increased over 13% year over year in the first nine months of AY 2009.

MIT expanded parking options at 5 satellite off-campus sites. In combination with existing shuttle services, we added 22 spaces at Lincoln Lab and 10 spaces at Wellesley College for commuters who come in from the western suburbs.  Parking can be a barrier to the formation of car and van pools. To help with this, we added rideshare parking at Haystack, Endicott House and Bates.

To reduce the environmental impact for commuters who need to drive to MIT and to encourage MIT drivers to choose an environmentally friendly vehicle the next time they make a vehicle purchase, 20% parking discount was introduced for eco-friendly vehicles.

A private transit reimbursement has been added for those who do not live within a transit area serviced by the MBTA. Eligible providers include Amtrak, Peter Pan and P&B. It provides a monthly $75 “commuter check” to participants up to a monthly maximum of $120 when combined with a MBTA pass.

A recent survey has shown that number of MIT commuters driving alone the entire way to campus (a key metric of commuter programs) decreased from 26% to 22%.

Community engagement and behavior change for energy conservation

The Task Force has launched the new GreeningMIT campaign to bring MITEI to the entire MIT community. GreeningMIT is a new initiative to engage all students, staff, and faculty in taking action to make our campus more sustainable and advance priority actions of the Task Force. Through awareness campaigns, information resources, planning tools, and a supportive network of Green Ambassadors, the Campus Energy Task Force is making it easy for everyone to make a difference in their "place" at MIT. The Green Ambassadors program is a new initiative to create and empower a network of individuals interested in taking action in their own lab, office, or dormitory to promote more sustainable practices at MIT.  Areas of focus include energy conservation, resource efficiency, green purchasing, alternative transportation, awareness, and outreach. To date, the Task Force has recruited over 90 individual Green Ambassadors to support the Institute’s energy and environmental stewardship objectives.

MITEI’s Energy Futures Week, held during IAP 2009, featured several activities to showcase the work of the Campus Energy Task Force to “walk the talk” and kick-off the community engagement activities of the GreeningMIT campaign. With a community rally, panel discussions, a “greening” workshop, and launch of the new greeningMIT logo, we were able to engage hundreds of the MIT community and raise awareness of ways we all can promote sound energy and environmental practices in our daily lives.

Efficient computing

The energy impact from the use of information technology and services (IS&T) on campus is substantial. To identify measures that can reduce those impacts and advance more sustainable IT practices, the Task Force has supported the energy program efforts of IS&T. Some recent highlights include:

 

Server virtualization: IS&T has licensed virtualization software for use at MIT from VMware Inc. Use of virtualization software will enable the consolidation of multiple underutilized physical servers through the creation of  multiple virtual machines (VM's) on a single physical server. An added benefit is the ability to run multiple operating systems on a single server and not needing to purchase two separate servers. The reduction in physical servers results in reduction in power and cooling energy.

Potential recent savings from reduced power use and cooling requirements from using virtualization include 1,885,465 kWh of electricity, reducing 848 tons of CO2 emissions.

Top users of VM licenses include: Lincoln Labs (46%) and IS&T (38%). Application types include web servers, infrastructure support, development, and testing. Additional IS&T energy projects are detailed at http://web.mit.edu/ist/initiatives/it-energy/ .

Student learning and engagement

The Task Force provides opportunities to engage students in the work of the Campus Energy Program that provide rich learning and educational experiences while also contributing valuable research, analysis, and project implementation. These opportunities are found both within and outside MIT’s curricula and allow students, faculty, and staff to engage in hands-on research and exploration using the operations and management of our own campus infrastructure as a rich test bed of ideas and approaches. We are using MIT’s campus operations as a learning laboratory – through UROPs, special classes, internships, and research projects - to foster students’ emerging technical and leadership skills to help define and solve our own energy challenges. This past year 13 UROPs and internships that focused on campus energy issues were supported by Task Force members – partnerships between academic and administrative units. Through the MITEI Student Campus Energy Project Fund, we have been able to support over 30 student projects on campus that engage our students and advance our campus energy objectives while simultaneously providing rich learning opportunities.

The Task Force also facilitates and supports MIT research activities that use our campus facilities for real world testing. For example, a year long monitoring program in IS&T’s main building (N42) conducted by a Building Technology Program PhD student was recently completed. The purpose of the project was to identify potential avenues for efficiency savings at N42. After installing several devices for measuring daylighting and temperature in the building, the project was able to identify simple lighting and HVAC efficiency opportunities that might save over 20% of IS&T's electricity bill at their headquarters.

IS&T is also participating in a recently funded MITEI seed grant proposal entitled "The MIT Enernet". Submitted by Profs Neil Gershenfeld, Carlo Rati, and Harvey Michaels, the multi-disciplinary MIT Enernet project combines network activity data from IS&T with energy data from MIT Facilities in an analytical framework that will allow MIT Facilities to quickly identify energy efficiency opportunities in every building at MIT.

Fundraising

The Task Force has identified two major areas for fund-raising related to the campus energy effort: educational opportunities tied to the campus energy activities and an investment fund for energy efficiency improvements in the campus infrastructure. This past year, we have secured two significant alumni gifts totaling $1.5 million to support priority initiatives of the Task Force and advance our campus energy objectives. Both gifts reflect the compelling and innovative features of our campus energy program that allow for community engagement in shaping MIT’s future while also providing robust financial returns through energy cost savings. We will continue to develop and build awareness of these opportunities. Using widely accepted methods for measuring and verifying savings from donor supported energy conservation projects, we will be in a strong position to demonstrate to the donor community the real impact of these gifts to MIT.


SUSTAINABILITY STAFF
11) Does your school employ sustainability staff (excluding student employees and interns)?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please provide titles and number of sustainability staff.
[4    ]  Number of full-time staff (in FTE). Titles: [Deputy Director – Sustainability Program (EHS HQ Office); Manager, Sustainability Engineering and Utility Planning (Dept. of Facilities); LEED Coordinator (Dept. of Facilities)         ]
[1    ]  Number of part-time staff (in FTE). Titles: [Assistant Officer – Sustainability Program]

12) Does the head of the sustainability staff report directly to the president or another high-level administrator (e.g., vice president, vice chancellor)?
[  ]  N/A
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please describe: Sustainability Program reports to Managing Director EHS Programs, who reports to the Executive Vice President and Treasurer.

OFFICE OR DEPARTMENT
13) Does your school have an office or department specifically dedicated to furthering sustainability on campus?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please describe (including name of office or department and year created): Environment, Health and Safety Headquarters Office (2000) has a Campus Sustainability Program; and Systems Engineering Group – Dept. of Facilities has dedicated staff advancing sustainable building and engineering practices.

WEBSITE
14) Does your school have a website detailing its sustainability initiatives?

[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please provide URL:

- http://mit.edu/environment/commitment/index.html

- http://mit.edu/facilities/environmental/index.html

- http://mit.edu/mitei/campus/index.html

- http://mit.edu/mitei/campus/projects-2.html


GREEN PURCHASING
15) Does your school have a formal green purchasing policy?

[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please describe policy and provide URL to full policy, if available: In 2003, MIT’s Executive Vice President established an environmentally preferable purchasing policy to encourage the purchase of goods that contains recycled content, is remanufactured, is recyclable or less harmful to the environment. The Procurement Department endorses the purchase of environmentally preferable products (EPPs), and incorporates EPP specifications into major commodity requests for proposal. http://web.mit.edu/environment/commitment/procurement.html

http://web.mit.edu/ENVIRONMENT/reduce/env_living.html

16) Does your school purchase ENERGY STAR qualified products?
[  ]  No
[x]  Some. Please describe: There are several initiatives on campus to promote the purchase of energy efficient equipment. Including: through our new “greeningMIT” initiative, the broad MIT community is encouraged to purchase Energy Star (or equivalent) rated computers, refrigerators, office equipment, etc.; the IS&T Departmental Informational Technology Resource (DITR) team works collaboratively to promote with the Office of Procurement the purchase of equipment that meets the 80PLUS power supply efficiency guidelines. MIT joined the Climate Savers Computing Initiative launched by Google, Intel, EPA and the World Wildlife Fund to support the use of efficient power supplies. Central and departmental IT services promote the purchase of Energy Star related computing equipment when appropriate.

[  ]  All

17) Does your school purchase environmentally preferable paper products (e.g., 100 percent post-consumer recycled content, certified by the Forest Stewardship Council)?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Some. Please describe: Virtually 100% of standard copies and over 95% of specialty copies by MIT Copy Technology Centers have recycled content. Across campus, approximately 79% of all paper purchased through our primary office supply vendor was recycled content, as was 80% of printer cartridges and toner – these three categories constitute nearly 50% of all office supplies purchased from MIT’s primary office supply vendor.  
[  ]  All. Please describe:

18) Does your school purchase Green Seal, Environmental Choice certified, or biorenewable cleaning products?
[  ]  No
[]  Some. Please describe:
[ x]  All. Please describe: Custodial Services has launched major new green cleaning services and products including switching for the entire campus to Green Seal cleaners, bulk packaging options, reusable green cleaning equipment, use of Eco Floor Scrubbers that use a positive (alkaline) and negative (acid) electrical charge interaction to clean floors without a cleaning chemical. They uses 70% less water than other scrubbers and is safer, too, since it leaves the floor completely dry.


19) Are your school's computer/electronics purchase decisions made in accordance with standards such as the Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT)?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Some. Please describe: MIT is a founding member of the Google Climate Savers initiative that promotes the purchase of greener, more efficient IT equipment. Central IT services and central procurement promotes the purchase of Energy Star computers, power supplies, and other IT equipment. Departments purchase the balance of campus computers, and decisions are made locally. Central IT services works with department IT offices to promote greener computing options.
[  ]  All

20) Does your school use only pesticides that meet the standards for organic crop production set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture or Canadian Organic Standards (excluding on-campus farms)?
[  x]  No
[  ]  Some. Please describe:
[  ]  All

CLIMATE CHANGE & ENERGY

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS INVENTORY
21) Has your school completed a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventory?
Please check all that apply.
[  ]  No.
[  ]  In progress. Please describe status and provide estimated completion date:
x ]  Yes.  Please provide total annual GHG emissions (in metric tons of CO2e). Also, include the start date for each year as well as the URL to each inventory, if available online, or attach the document.
2008:
314,544 MTCE

2007: 252,113

2006: 269,883
2005: 
252,775

 

COMMITMENT TO GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTION
The purchase of carbon offsets does not count toward greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions for this indicator. They are counted in a subsequent indicator.
22) Has your school made a commitment to reducing GHG emissions by a specific amount?
[]  No.

  [X]  Yes. MIT has made an institutional commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote and adopt sustainable energy practices. MIT has chosen a different path than other schools in not setting specific greenhouse gas reduction goals as this approach is not meaningful for all institutions. MIT has major campus energy programs and is developing and modeling best practices for rational and economically viable strategies for GHG reductions, energy conservation, and greener energy production. It has not been established that a “one-size-fits-all” approach is well suited to the diverse university community.

Reduction level:
Baseline year:
Target date:

 

If you answered only "No" or "In progress" to question 21, please now skip to question 27.

REALIZED GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS
23) Has your school achieved a reduction in GHG emissions?
[  ]  No
[  x]  Yes. When our co-generation facility was installed in 1995, MIT’s greenhouse gas emissions from utilities were reduced by 33%. In addition from 2006 to 2007, we reduced emissions from 269,883 MTE to 252,113 MTCE. We are currently investigating the reasons for the increase the following year. Growth in building square footage and increased plug loads contribute to net increases.

2006: list details. As indicated above, GHG re
Percentage reduced:
Baseline year:
Date achieved:

24) Please provide the total heating and cooling degree days averaged over the past three years.
Data on total degree heating and cooling days is available at: http://www.degreedays.net/ . This information will be used to help reduce bias between schools in different climates.
Cooling degree days average over the past three years:
Heating degree days average over the past three years:

25) Please provide GHG emissions figures on a per-thousand-square-foot basis for the past three years.
Per-Thousand-Square-Foot Emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total maintained building space in thousands of square feet.
2008: NA: See below
2007: NA: See below
2006: NA: See below

Note:  The Ivy+ Sustainability Working Group, of which MIT is a member, has recently considered these benchmarking exercises to compare performance and sharing best practices.  Factors considered were geographic location (annual degree days), locales (key for transportation emissions), density of campus area, research universities vs. teaching colleges, and the existence of a medical or veterinary schools or departments within the university.  The medical and research aspects were particularly important considerations. For example, one metric considered was “lab intensity,” and is derived from the number of fume hoods per square foot of campus space.  The group decided not to use emissions/GSF or emissions/student due to additional explanation required to interpret them in their respective institutional context.  The Ivy+ Working group decided that a sound metric is that of trends - the trend of each individual school and the aggregate emissions. Therefore many Ivy+ institutions will opt not to report these metrics as they offer poor and often misleading comparable metrics.


26) Please provide GHG emissions figures on a per-full-time-student basis for the past three years.
Per-Student Emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total number of full-time enrolled students.
2008: NA: See below
2007: NA: See below
2006: NA: See below

Note:  The Ivy+ Sustainability Working Group, of which MIT is a member, has recently considered these benchmarking exercises to compare performance and sharing best practices.  Factors considered were geographic location (annual degree days), locales (key for transportation emissions), density of campus area, research universities vs. teaching colleges, and the existence of a medical or veterinary schools or departments within the university.  The medical and research aspects were particularly important considerations. For example, one metric considered was “lab intensity,” and is derived from the number of fume hoods per square foot of campus space.  The group decided not to use emissions/GSF or emissions/student due to additional explanation required to interpret them in their respective institutional context.  The Ivy+ Working group decided that a sound metric is that of trends - the trend of each individual school and the aggregate emissions. Therefore many Ivy+ institutions will opt not to report these metrics as they offer poor and often misleading comparable metrics.

 
ENERGY EFFICIENCY
27) What programs or technologies has your school implemented to improve energy efficiency (e.g., cogeneration plant, retrocommissioning of HVAC systems, performing system tune-ups, temperature setbacks)?
 

MIT has recently invested or committed to invest over $2 million in energy conservation measures including lighting retrofits, building retro- and continuous commissioning, steam trap renewal, HVAC enhancements, chilled beam systems, fume hood airflow reductions, etc. See question 10 for specific details as well as http://mit.edu/mitei/campus/projects-2.html .

 

The MIT Campus Energy Program strives to reduce energy costs and emissions, educate the community about energy issues, and serve as an energy model for others. The Student Campus Energy Project Fund serves as a grant mechanism for students, promoting sustainability, energy efficiency, and renewable energy on campus. An Energy Conservation Investment Fund has recently been established to invest in campus conservation and efficiency projects with accrued savings being reinvested into additional conservation projects.

 

MIT's  award-winning  1995 installation of cogeneration reduced MIT's greenhouse gas emissions by 32% and regulated pollutants NOx and SOx by 45%.  A whole campus lighting upgrade program was carried out in the 1990s via the EPA GreenLights program. Additional lighting retrofit programs have recently been carried out.


ENERGY CONSERVATION
28) Do you facilitate programs that encourage members of the campus community to reduce energy use (e.g., cash incentives, signs reminding individuals to turn off lights and appliances)?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please describe: A major new community engagement initiative has been launched (greeningMIT) that promotes energy conservation by all members of the MIT community. In addition, a new eco-rep program has been established and MIT currently has approx 90 Green Ambassadors who are staff, student, and faculty change agents in departments and dorms to promote energy conservation. Major community awareness and outreach campaigns have been launched this year. MIT supports with grants student efforts to promote energy conservation. MIT administration partners with faculty to develop class projects focused on campus energy issues including conservation and efficiency. MIT had recently developed new policies for custodians to turn off lights in offices and labs where appropriate. Recently, the 15 most used revolving doors on campus have had new signs and stickers installed to promote revolving door use.  IT Energy@MIT was launched by the Information Services and Technology department to promote conserving energy use by personal computers. MIT support an annual all dorm Electricity Competition to encourage reductions in dorm energy use. It has been successful for the past 3 years.  MIT has also hosted local Carbon Rally teams to compete for campus energy reductions. MIT also supports student projects that seek to reduce energy use on campus by providing annual Student Campus Energy Project Grants.

RENEWABLE ENERGY GENERATION
29)  Does your school generate renewable electricity?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please specify percentage of overall electricity generated from each of the following sources and describe details below.
[    %]  B100 biodiesel
[    %]  Clean biomass
[    %]  Concentrating solar power (CSP)
[    %]  Geothermal
[    %]  Low-impact hydropower
[    <1%]  Solar photovoltaics: MIT currently has 60kw installed capacity of solar PV in 4 separate systems. This year, a new 40kW solar photovoltaic array was installed and supplements energy used by the new Great Dome lighting project. Through the MIT Community Solar Power Initiative, MIT supported the installation of an additional 22 photovoltaic systems in the community.
[    %]  Wind
[    %]  Other

Description:

30)  Does your school have solar hot water systems?
[  x]  No; but we are planning a new system on the new graduate dorm NW35.
[  ]  Yes. Please specify number of systems and total BTUs generated annually, if available:


RENEWABLE ENERGY PURCHASE
31) Has your school purchased electric energy from renewable sources or renewable energy credits (RECs)?

RECs and electricity from renewable sources must be Green-e certified or meet the requirements of the Green-e standard.
[ x ]  No. MIT does not believe this is currently a meaningful strategy for institutional greenhouse gas emissions reductions.
[  ]  Yes. Please describe.
Date of most recent contract:
Quantity (kWh):
Percentage of your total electric energy use that it represents:

 

32) Has your school purchased non-electric energy from renewable sources?
[  ]  No
[  x]  Yes. Please describe. MIT currently purchases and uses a commercial biodiesel blend to operate all diesel grounds maintenance vehicles. MIT is currently installing a biodiesel processor to convert campus waste vegetable oil into 100% biodiesel for use in MIT’s campus vehicles.
Date of most recent contract: NA
Quantity (BTUs): NA
Percentage of your total non-electric energy use that it represents: NA

ON-SITE COMBUSTION
33) Please provide total BTUs of energy for heating and cooling from on-site combustion:
14,459,473 xE5 btu heating and cooling

34) Please list each fuel source (e.g., coal, natural gas, oil) and the percent of overall BTUs derived from that source:
90% gas 10% oil

35) Is any on-site combustion for heating and cooling derived from renewable sources?
[ x ]  No
[  ]  Yes. Please describe.
Percentage on-site combustion derived from renewable sources: [   %]
Total BTUs of energy generated from renewable sources: [#      ]
Description of renewable energy sources used for on-site combustion for heating and cooling:

FOOD & RECYCLING
The food portion of this category is covered in a separate dining survey.

RECYCLING OF TRADITIONAL MATERIALS
36) Please indicate which traditional materials your institution recycles (check all that apply).

[  ]  None
[ x ]  Aluminum
[ x ]  Cardboard
[ x ]  Glass
[ x ]  Paper
[ x ]  Plastics (all)
[  ]  Plastics (some)
[  x]  Other. Please list: yard waste, white goods, mattresses, construction waste, tires, plastic bags, packing materials,

37) Diversion rate: [    40%]

RECYCLING OF ELECTRONIC WASTE
38) Does your institution have an electronics recycling program?

[  ]  No
[ X]  Yes. If available, please indicate the total annual weight or volume of each material collected for recycling or reuse.
[ x  ]  Batteries
[ x  ]  Cell phones
[ x  ]  Computers
[ x  ]  Lightbulbs
[ x  ]  Printer cartridges
[ x  ]  Other E-waste. Please list: MIT also recycles computer accessories, CDs, VHS tapes, discs, and microwaves.

COMPOSTING (ASIDE FROM DINING FACILITIES)
39) What percentage of your campus's landscaping waste is composted or mulched?

[     100  %]

40) Do you provide composting receptacles around campus in locations other than dining halls (e.g., in residence halls, offices, academic buildings)?
[ ]  No:

[ x ]  Yes. Please describe: Upon special request, composting receptacles can be provided for certain events.


SOURCE REDUCTION
41) Do you have any source-reduction initiatives (e.g., end-of-semester furniture or clothing swaps and collections)?

[  ]  No
[  x]  Yes. Please describe: MIT offers an annual dorm clean-out event/service “Stuff Fest” where all dorms have a designated place at end-of-semester for swapping dorm materials. All remaining goods are donated to local charities. Over 5 tons of material is donated during the event. In addition, MIT student groups host “Swap Meets” to exchange unwanted materials to reduce waste generation. MIT also operates a year-round furniture exchange service and warehouse open to the MIT community.

GREEN BUILDING

GREEN BUILDING POLICY
42) Does your school have a formal green building policy?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please describe policy and provide URL to the full policy, if available: All new construction and major renovations will meet or exceed LEED-Silver Plus standards. http://mit.edu/environment/commitment/env_goals.html

GREEN BUILDING STANDARDS
43)
Please indicate LEED-certified buildings.
[#     1 ]  Total number of LEED-certified buildings.
[    sq ft]  Certified-level (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:
[ 411,000  sq ft]  Silver-level (combined gross square footage). Please list building names: Brain and Cognitive Sciences Complex
[    sq ft]  Gold-level (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:
[    sq ft]  Platinum-level (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:

44) Please indicate buildings that meet LEED certification criteria but are not certified.
[#      ]  Total number of buildings that meet LEED criteria
[    sq ft]  Certified-level criteria met, but not certified (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:
[   720,000 sq ft]  Silver-level criteria met, but not certified (combined gross square footage). Please list building names: Stata Center
[   sq ft]  Gold-level criteria met, but not certified (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:
[    sq ft]  Platinum-level criteria met, but not certified (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:
NOTE: MIT has registered three major additional buildings under construction or recently completed with LEED, they are expected to be Gold-level.


45) Please indicate buildings that are ENERGY STAR labeled.
[#     0 ]  Total number of ENERGY STAR buildings. Please list building names:
[    sq ft]  Combined gross square footage.

RENOVATIONS AND RETROFITS
46) Please indicate LEED-EB certified buildings.
[#    0  ]  Total number of LEED-EB certified buildings. Please list building names:
[    sq ft]  Combined gross square footage.

47) Please indicate buildings that meet LEED-EB certification criteria but are not certified.
[#      ]  Total number of buildings that meet LEED-EB criteria but are not certified. Please list building names:
[    sq ft]  Combined gross square footage.

Not known

48) Please indicate renovated buildings that are ENERGY STAR labeled.
[#     0 ]  Total number of renovated buildings that are ENERGY STAR labeled. Please list building names:
[    sq ft]  Combined gross square footage.

49) What energy-efficiency technologies have you installed in existing buildings (e.g., HVAC systems, motion sensors, ambient light sensors, T5 lighting, LED lighting, timers, laundry technology)?    For each technology, please indicate the number and type of fixtures installed, and the number of buildings in which those fixtures are installed. If possible, include either the percentage of the overall campus fixtures each type represents or the percentage of overall maintained building space that has been renovated with the technology (e.g., 20 buildings representing 10 percent of maintained building space have been retrofitted with motion sensors; thus, 10 percent of the total maintained building space in square feet would be the desired data).  

 

Occupancy sensors, day lighting sensors, LED lighting, continuous commissioning, steam trap renewal, chilled beam HVAC systems, vending misers, T5 lighting, front loading/energy star dorm washing machines, etc.

50) What water-conservation technologies have you installed in existing buildings (e.g., low-flow faucets, low-flow showerheads, waterless urinals, dual-flush toilets, gray water systems, laundry technology)?   

For each technology, please indicate the number and type of fixtures installed, and the number of buildings in which those fixtures are installed. If possible, include either the percentage of the overall campus fixtures each type represents or the percentage of overall maintained building space that has been renovated with the technology (e.g., 20 buildings representing 10 percent of the maintained building space have been retrofitted with low-flow faucets; thus, 10 percent of the total maintained building space in square feet would be the desired data).   

 

Equipment upgrades such as low-flow bathroom appliances for toilets and faucets in academic and residential buildings save nearly 30 million gallons of water per year. Equipment that reuses water and other lab and process improvements save another 40 million gallons a year.

51) What percentage of your institution's non-hazardous construction and demolition waste is diverted from landfills?
[  approx. 100 %]

STUDENT INVOLVEMENT

RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITIES
52) Are there any sustainability-themed residential communities or housing options at your school?
[x ]  No
[  ]  Yes. Please provide details below.
Name of program:
Type of community (e.g., hall, building, house):
Number of students involved:
Additional details:

NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION
53) Does a portion of your new student orientation specifically cover sustainability?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please describe how sustainability is incorporated (e.g., information sessions, green tour): During orientation, all freshman receive a 12-page pamphlet titled "Guide to Sustainability @ MIT" which details how to get involved with sustainability initiatives, what programs are already in place, and an MIT sustainability pledge. In addition incoming students will receive a brochure outlining ways to get engaged in campus sustainability activities and save energy.

INTERNSHIPS/OUTREACH OPPORTUNITIES
54) Does your school offer on-campus office-based sustainability internships or jobs for students?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please provide number of students and average number of hours worked weekly per student:
[#    12 ]  Paid positions. Average hours worked weekly per student: 10
[#   1  ]  Unpaid positions. Average hours worked weekly per student: 5

55) Does your school have residence hall Eco-Reps or other similar programs to promote behavioral change on campus?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please provide details below, and indicate URL if available:
[#     ]  Paid positions. Average hours worked weekly per student:
[#     ]  Positions that award academic credit. Average hours worked weekly per student:
[#   approx 19  ]  Uncompensated positions. Average hours worked weekly per student: NA

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
56) Does your school have active student-run organizations devoted to sustainability efforts on campus?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please provide total number of active organizations, names of organizations, a brief description of each, and URLs, if available: Sustainability@MIT ( http://sustainability.mit.edu/projects/campus ), Energy Club, SAVE, SFGS, Food@MIT, Sloan Energy and Environment Club.

SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGES AND COMPETITIONS
57) Does your school organize any sustainability challenges/competitions for your campus and/or with other colleges?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please list details for all competitions.
Name of competition: Dorm Electricity Competition
Year initiated: 2007
Frequency of competition: Once per year
Participants: Students
Incentives: The winning dorm receives $10,000 in energy retrofits.
Goal of competition: Reduce energy use
Percent of energy/water/waste reduced: approx. 12%
Lasting effects of competition:
Website: http://energymap.mit.edu/dorm

 

Name of competition: Recyclemania
Year initiated:
Frequency of competition: Once per year
Participants: Students, faculty, staff
Incentives: Dinner award
Goal of competition: Increase recycling rate
Percent of energy/water/waste reduced:
Lasting effects of competition:
Website: www.recyclemania.org

 

Name of competition: MIT Carbon Rally
Year initiated: 2009
Frequency of competition: Once per year
Participants: Students, faculty, staff
Incentives: prize money
Goal of competition: energy conservation, energy efficiency
Percent of energy/water/waste reduced:
Lasting effects of competition:
Website: http://www.carbonrally.com/pages/MIT-rally


TRANSPORTATION

CAMPUS MOTOR FLEET

58) How many vehicles are in your institution's fleet?
[#     169] Note: Main Cambridge campus

59) Please list the number of alternative-fuel vehicles in each class.
[#    3    ]  Hybrid. Please list makes and models: Ford Escapes
[#     3   ]  Electric. Please describe type of vehicles: GEM electric
[#     6   ]  Biodiesel. Please describe type of vehicles and list biodiesel blend(s) used: Current using B5 blend. Will scale up as on-campus production increased. Biodiesel@MIT is a project that will be able to produces 5,000 gallons per year of biodiesel from used vegetable oil to be used in MIT vehicles.
[#      2  ]  Other. Please describe: Compressed natural gas vehicles.

60) What is the average GHG emission rate per passenger mile of your institution's motorized fleet?
[#      NA  ]  pounds of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) per passenger mile traveled.

LOCAL TRANSPORTATION ALTERNATIVES
61) Does your school offer incentives for carpooling?
[  ]  N/A. Please explain:
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please describe details of the program including the type of the incentive and eligible community members (e.g., faculty, staff, students): MIT runs and subsidizes a vanpool program for faculty and staff. MIT offers GoLoco ride sharing services via on-line platform.

62) Does your school offer public transportation subsidies?
[  ]  N/A. Please explain:
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please describe the program including the size of the discount (as a percent of full price) and eligible community members (e.g., faculty, staff, students): MIT subsidizes the purchase of monthly MBTA passes as well as commuter train tickets for students and employees.

63) Does your school provide free transportation around campus?
[  ]  N/A. Please explain:
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please describe: MIT runs the TECH shuttle, Northwest Shuttle, and Lincoln Lab around the campus on weekdays. The Saferide shuttle operates at night.

64) Does your school operate a free transportation shuttle to local off-campus destinations?
[  ]  N/A. Please explain:
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please describe: MIT operates shuttles that run to local grocery stores, Wellesley College, and around Cambridge. The Daytime Boston shuttle runs to popular locations in the city on weekdays.

BICYCLE PROGRAM
65) Does your school offer a bicycle-sharing/rental program or bicycle repair services?
[  ]  No
[x]  Yes. Please provide details below.
Year created: 2005
Number of bikes available: 3
Fees for participation: Free
Repair services provided: yes by members

CAR-SHARING PROGRAM
66) Does your school partner with a car-sharing program?

[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please provide details below. MIT provides discounts and corporate programs for ZipCar membership. MIT has several on-campus ZipCar parking spaces.
Year created:
Total number of vehicles: 7
Number of hybrid vehicles: 1+
Fee for membership: $25/year

PLANNING
67) Does your school have policies that support a pedestrian-friendly or bike-friendly campus (e.g., in the school's master plan, a policy prohibiting vehicles from the center of campus)?

[  ]  N/A. Please explain:
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please describe: Full-time bike commuters are reimbursed by the school and offered discounts to MIT Recreation facilities. There are showers available for registered bicycle commuters. For a $5 fee, MIT students and employees can use and store their bike in a secure bike compound, and they can purchase a helmet for a discounted price.

68) What percentage of individuals commute to campus via environmentally preferable transportation (e.g., walking, bicycling, carpooling, using public transit)?
[   78%] Only 22% of MIT commuters drive alone to work. Others use walking, bicycling, carpooling, ridesharing, using public transit

STATISTICS

69) Campus setting:
[  ]  Rural
[  ]  Suburban
[x  ]  Urban
[  ]  Other. Please describe:

70)  Total number of buildings: [#     144   owned ]
71)  Combined gross square footage of all buildings: [#     11.4M gsf owned space  ]
72)  Full-time enrollment (undergraduate and graduate): [#   10,300      ]
73)  Part-time enrollment (undergraduate and graduate): [#     NA    ]
74)  Part-time enrollment as a proportion to a full-time course load: [#     NA    ]
75)  Percent of full-time students that live on campus: [   approx 50  % in MIT dorms, others in campus affiliated independent living groups, ie. Fraternities]

For the FY 2009

 

Enrollment for undergrads was 4153 and we housed 3009 or 72% in on campus housing

Enrollment for Graduates was 6146 and we housed 2417 or 39% in on campus housing

Enrollment in all FSILGs was 900 of which 377 are in the MIT owned FSILG buildings below.

MIT Real Estate (Mitimco) holds 211 graduate students and 6 undergraduates in their apartment buildings.

Questions 76-87 are for informational purposes only; responses will NOT be included in the Report Card evaluation process.

OTHER AREAS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGAGEMENT

Please mark an "X" next to each item that applies to your institution.

76)  Outdoors club: [ x ]
77)  Disposable water bottle ban: [  ]
78)  Participation in Recyclemania: [ x ]
79)  Student trustee position: [ x ]
80)  Environmental science/studies major: [ x ]
81)  Environmental science/studies minor or concentration: [ x ]
82)  Graduate-level environmental program: [  x]
83)  Student green fee: [  ]
84)  Alumni green fund: [x  ]
85)  Revolving loan fund for sustainability projects: [ x, non-loan student grants and non-loan revolving fund]
86)  Campus garden or farm: [x  ]
87)  Single-stream recycling: [x  ]

 

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