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Report Card 2010

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University of Missouri–Columbia

Campus Survey

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With the publication of the College Sustainability Report Card 2010, more than 1,100 school survey responses from over 300 institutions are now available online. In total, these surveys offer more than 10,000 pages of data collected from colleges and universities during the summer of 2009 . To access surveys from other schools, go to the  surveys section  of the website. To see grades, or to access additional surveys submitted by this school, please click the "Back to Report Card" link at the beginning or end of the survey.

 

Name: Steve Burdic
Title:
Sustainability Coordinator
Date survey submitted:
July 21, 2009

ADMINISTRATION
SUSTAINABILITY POLICIES
1) Does your school have its own formal sustainability policy?
[  ]  No
[ X ]  Yes. Please describe and provide URL, if available:

http://sustainability.cf.missouri.edu/resources/taskforce09_final.pdf

Currently the University is in the process of drafting its official sustainability policy. The current draft reads, “The University of Missouri is dedicated to environmentally sustainable policies and practices that promote responsible stewardship of existing resources and the environment. This includes, but is not limited to, acquiring and using energy-saving, environmentally friendly and renewable/recyclable resources and materials; providing educational programs, resources and incentives for sustainable practices by students, faculty and staff; participating in recycling programs and the safe disposal of materials; researching and testing new sustainable initiatives; and taking proactive steps to preserve and protect natural resources. Each unit or department within the University is encouraged to evaluate current policies and practices on a regular basis with the goal of adopting or improving sustainability.”

 

2) Has the president of your institution signed the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment (ACUPCC)?
[  ]  No
[ X ]  Yes. If completed, please provide the date the GHG Report was submitted to the ACUPCC:

Our GHG report is due 1/15/10

3) Has your institution signed the Talloires Declaration?
[ X ]  No
[  ]  Yes

4) Is there a sustainability component in your institution's master plan and/or strategic plan (check all that apply)?
[  ]  No
[ X ]  Yes, in the master plan. Please describe and provide URL, if available:

http://www.cf.missouri.edu/masterplan/intro/intro.html

The University of Missouri campus contains over 6 million gross square feet (GSF) of building space classified as Educational & General (E&G) housing teaching, research and administrative support. Nearly 70 percent of this space is over 30 years old and over 40 percent exceeds 50 years. These older structures constitute a resource that, in future years, will prove exceptionally valuable to MU. That value can be realized by a partnership of campus interests dedicated to achieving the most effective use of existing facilities to further MU's academic mission.

New E&G space represents 25 percent of the total building area added to the campus since 1980. Student activity functions, residential, athletic, medical, research and parking facilities constitute most of the building area growth during this period. Like other U.S. flagship universities, MU's expansion was a response to a host of demands for services and support activities to maintain its mission and comply with changing standards and mandates.

Environmental Sustainability is listed as a Planning Principle in the University Master Plan. It states that the University should “embrace suitable strategies in promoting sustainable sites, water efficiency, energy and atmosphere, materials and resources, and indoor environmental quality.”

[  ]  Yes, in the strategic plan. Please describe and provide URL, if available:

ADVISORY COUNCIL
5) Does your school have a council or committee that advises on and/or implements policies and programs related to sustainability?
[  ]  No
[ X ]  Yes

If you answered "No" to question 5, please proceed directly to question 11.
6) Please provide the name of the committee and list the number of meetings held since August 2008.
Name: Environmental Affairs & Sustainability Committee
Number of meetings: 5

7) Please provide number of stakeholder representatives on the committee.
[1] Administrators
[9] Faculty
[4] Staff
[7] Students
[# ] Other. Please describe:

8) Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents. If 2009-2010 academic year information is not yet available, please provide information for 2008-2009 instead.
Name of chair(s): Daniel Hooley Position(s) (e.g., administrator, faculty, staff, student): Faculty

9) To whom does the committee report (e.g., president, vice president)? The Provost

10) Please list key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2008.
Updated the Campus Sustainability Report.

·         In April 2003, the Environmental Affairs & Sustainability Committee released its initial study, “The Impacts of Campus Activities on the Environment.” This initial report was the Committee’s first attempt to address resource use and environmental issues at the University of Missouri (MU) in a comprehensive manner. Each year since, questionnaires have been distributed to various campus departments in the early months of the year to collect follow up information from the initial report. Attempts have been made to collect data comparable to that collected in the initial report. In addition, survey questions have been updated to better define resource usage and impacts. In 2008 the committee decided to change the name of the report from “The Report on the Impacts of Campus Activities on the Environment,” to, “University of Missouri Environmental Sustainability Report,” in order to better reflect common terminology and

to more accurately describe the report‘s purpose.

·         The EASC also hosted the National Teach-In activities on campus.

·         Progress made on each of these issues since August 2008: Completed the 2008 Campus Sustainability Updated in September and began the 2009 update in April. The EASC held the National Teach-In on Feb. 6 , 2009.

SUSTAINABILITY STAFF

11) Does your school employ sustainability staff (excluding student employees and interns)?
[  ]  No
[ X ]  Yes. Please provide titles and number of sustainability staff.
[#  2  ]  Number of full-time staff (in FTE). Titles: [ Sustainability Coordinator, and Executive Staff Assistant II.]
[# 0   ]  Number of part-time staff (in FTE). Titles: [        ]

12) Does the head of the sustainability staff report directly to the president or another high-level administrator (e.g., vice president, vice chancellor)?
[  ]  N/A
[  ]  No
[ X ]  Yes. Please describe: Reports to Assistant Vice Chancellor-Facilities

OFFICE OR DEPARTMENT
13) Does your school have an office or department specifically dedicated to furthering sustainability on campus?

[  ]  No
[ X ]  Yes. Please describe (including name of office or department and year created): Campus Facilities Sustainability Office created 2009

WEBSITE
14) Does your school have a website detailing its sustainability initiatives?

[  ]  No
[ X ]  Yes. Please provide URL: http://sustainability.cf.missouri.edu

GREEN PURCHASING
15)
Does your school have a formal green purchasing policy?
[  ]  No
[ X ]  Yes. Please describe policy and provide URL to full policy, if available:

http://sustainability.cf.missouri.edu/resources/taskforce09_final.pdf

Procurement

Sustainability Committee members examined the current use of procurement procedures including the procurement of recycled and sustainable commodities. The University of Missouri purchases more than $170 million of goods and services each year. While numerous departments have addressed sustainability issues in their procurement processes, additional actions should be taken to improve sustainability efforts throughout the campus.

Developing sustainability guidelines for procurement can have a lasting effect

across the entire campus since every department must make purchases in order to operate. Efforts should be made to promote campus procurement of recycled and sustainable commodities while minimizing use of other commodities by establishing contracts, increasing availability, and educating users, resulting in a more informed, holistic approach to campus purchases of these products.

Procurement is one segment of a circular sustainability process that also includes use and disposal. If appropriately disposed, products enter the procurement stream as recycled content. The latter portion of the cycle is addressed in the Recycling and Waste Management Report. The following recommendations address the sustainability factors that should be considered during the acquisition process.

 

16) Does your school purchase ENERGY STAR qualified products?
[  ]  No
[X  ]  Some. Please describe: The University does not currently make it a policy to purchase all ENERGY STAR rated products but most of its purchases do meet the qualification.
[  ]  All

17) Does your school purchase environmentally preferable paper products (e.g., 100 percent post-consumer recycled content, certified by the Forest Stewardship Council)?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Some. Please describe: Printing services uses 30% post consumer content paper in all print shops and 30% is their default paper for print jobs.  The paper is not FSC certified. There is also a 100% post consumer content paper option offered at all printing outlets.

 [  ]  All. Please describe:

18) Does your school purchase Green Seal, Environmental Choice certified, or biorenewable cleaning products?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Some. Please describe: Approximately half of the University’s cleaning products are Green Seal or equivalent. Green lotion soap is being used, and Campus Facilities and Residential Life use green label products when they can.  They also have switched to nano-fiber wipes and mop heads which last much longer. 
[  ]  All. Please describe:

19) Are your school's computer/electronics purchase decisions made in accordance with standards such as the Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT)?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Some. Please describe: All the University’s standard desktop and laptop computers are energy star rated and also have an option for the super energy efficient power supply which can create large reductions in power consumption

[  ]  All

20) Does your school use only pesticides that meet the standards for organic crop production set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture or Canadian Organic Standards (excluding on-campus farms)?
[ X ]  No
[  ]  Some. Please describe:
[  ]  All

CLIMATE CHANGE & ENERGY
GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS INVENTORY

21) Has your school completed a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventory?
Please check all that apply.
[  ]  No.
[  ]  In progress. Please describe status and provide estimated completion date: Data is complete for heating, cooling and Electrical production. We are making progress on commuter, agricultural and fugitive emissions.
[ X ]  Yes.  Please provide total annual GHG emissions (in metric tons of CO2e). Also, include the start date for each year as well as the URL to each inventory, if available online, or attach the document.
2008: 472,152
2007: 476,142
2006: 451,873
2005: 423,007

COMMITMENT TO GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTION
The purchase of carbon offsets does not count toward greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions for this indicator. They are counted in a subsequent indicator.

22) Has your school made a commitment to reducing GHG emissions by a specific amount?
[ X ]  No
[ ]  Yes. Please list details.
Reduction level:
Baseline year:
Target date:

If you answered only "No" or "In progress" to question 21, please now skip to question 27.
REALIZED GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS
23) Has your school achieved a reduction in GHG emissions?
[  ]  No
[ X ]  Yes. Please list details.
Percentage reduced: 11% reduction since 1990 on a square foot basis.
Baseline year: 1990
Date achieved: Cumulative since 1990 through 2009.

24) Please provide the total heating and cooling degree days averaged over the past three years.
Data on total degree heating and cooling days is available at: http://www.degreedays.net/ . This information will be used to help reduce bias between schools in different climates.
Cooling degree days average over the past three years: 235.36
Heating degree days average over the past three years: 428.28

25) Please provide GHG emissions figures on a per-thousand-square-foot basis for the past three years.
Per-Thousand-Square-Foot Emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total maintained building space in thousands of square feet.
2008: 41.69
2007: 42.53
2006: 33.49

26) Please provide GHG emissions figures on a per-full-time-student basis for the past three years.
Per-Student Emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total number of full-time enrolled students.
2008: 18.3
2007: 19.5
2006: 18.7

ENERGY EFFICIENCY
27) What programs or technologies has your school implemented to improve energy efficiency (e.g., cogeneration plant, retrocommissioning of HVAC systems, performing system tune-ups, temperature setbacks)?
 
MU has taken a leadership role for many years in reducing energy use on our campus with significant results.  While campus education and general (E&G) space has grown by 28% since 1990, energy use has been reduced by 12% on a square foot basis.  This is especially significant because much of the new space has been energy intensive research space.

This has been made possible through the use of our cogeneration plant that heats and cools the campus through the use of waste steam generated in electical production. This reduces our utility bills by nearly 40% over conventional boilers. We also have retrocommissioned numerous HVAC systems. All of the buildings on campus are centrally metered so we can perform system tune-ups, temperature set backs and other energy saving features from the central office.

The annual utility cost avoidance from energy conservation measures has now reached $4.3 million. This is equivalent to three degree programs or $170 reduction in tuition per student.  There are environmental benefits associated with this effort as well.  Since the program started MU has reduced greenhouse gas emission per square foot by 11%.  Based on EPA data, the corresponding reduction of CO 2 emissions is equivalent to the removal of 18,000 cars from our roadways or the planting of 28,000 acres of trees. 

MU has earned numerous awards for energy conservation success and environmental stewardship.  MU is considered a leader in energy conservation by the EPA and is a member of EPA’s Honor Society of Energy Star Buildings Partners. 

 Following is a description of our program by energy saving category.

  Energy Conservation Program

  • Lighting – In 1990 most lighting on campus was either incandescent or low efficiency fluorescent with magnetic ballasts.  Today over 99% of the exterior lighting and over 90% of the interior lighting on campus has been converted to high efficiency lighting.  Incandescent exit signs have been replaced with LED, reducing energy consumption by 80 – 90%.  Daylight harvesting has also been used to automatically turn off interior lights in areas that receive sunlight. 
  • Motion Sensors – Motion sensors have been installed in thousands of classrooms, offices, conference rooms, and laboratories to turn off lights and set-back thermostats when spaces are unoccupied.
  • Efficiency Upgrades of Building Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) Systems – Major HVAC systems have been retrofitted to higher efficiency systems.  These upgrades consisted of upgrading the controls, motors, regulation of air flow, use of energy recovery devices, and use of occupancy sensors/schedules to reduce building energy consumption. 
  • Design Standards for HVAC Systems – Energy efficiency design standards for HVAC systems are implemented on all campus projects to meet or exceed federal and state guidelines.  All new buildings and renovations are designed to meet ASHRAE 90.1 (American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers) to establish minimum energy efficient design requirements.  These design features include:

·        Building envelope insulation, walls, roof, and thermally efficient glazing.

·        Use variable volume air and water circulation systems

·        Use heat recovery on 100% OA systems

·        Use occupancy sensors for lighting control as well as control system temperature setback

·        Use high efficiency motors

·        Use high efficiency lighting systems

  • Campus Facilities Energy Management Control System (EMCS) – The EMCS is an automated digital control system for HVAC systems, which monitors, controls, and reports energy use while maintaining comfort in campus buildings.  Over the past 16 years the EMCS system has been expanded from fewer than 10 buildings to over 110 buildings comprising approximately 80% of the campus.
  • Reduced Building Energy Use and Analysis – All buildings are fully metered for energy consumption.  Metering data is analyzed and energy consumption patterns are identified.  Buildings showing a potential energy saving opportunities are audited and energy conservation projects are implemented.
  • Window Film – Window film has been installed on several buildings to reduce radiant heating during the summer months.
  • Water Reduction – Since 1990, even though space has increased by 28%, water use has decreased by 45%. This is a result of implementing projects to eliminate waste water cooling, using sensors in lavatories on sinks and fixtures, and other water conservation efforts.  On a total gallon/gsf basis we've reduced water use 57%. 
  • Campus-wide Energy Conservation Awareness – Campus faculty, staff, and students are encouraged to conserve energy through the use of advertisements and presentations.  In addition, engineers in the Campus Facilities Energy Management Department assist professors with tours and presentations in engineering classes. We also participate in events, such as Earth Day, to educate the public on our energy conservation efforts at MU. 
  • Chilled Water Loop – In 1990 each air conditioned building had its own system.  Today after installing over 16 miles of underground chilled water loop piping and connecting most of the major campus buildings to the loop, the number of chillers required has been reduced by 75%.  By taking advantage of the efficiencies inherent in the chilled loop system due to diversity, and by using the campus EMCS to operate the most efficient chillers first, the energy used to provide cooling to campus has been reduced significantly.  Over the past five years, cooling demand has increased 45%, but the energy to produce the chilled water for cooling has been reduced by over 50%.
  • Free Cooling – We have installed free cooling heat exchangers to take advantage of cold outside air to produce chilled water to cool specialized research equipment that needs cooling during winter months.  Prior to installing this free cooling system, electric chillers were run year-round to provide for this need.   This resulted in an 84% reduction in the cost to provide winter cooling.
  • Vehicles   - The University requires that 70% of vehicles purchases must be Alternative Fuel Vehicles (AFV
  • Trees – The University plants approximately 200 trees annually on the MU campus

Energy Production Efficiency

Generation Efficiencies – The MU power plant uses Combined Heat and Power technology to produce steam and electricity for the campus.  The efficiency of this process is nearly twice that of conventional power plants.  This reduces fuel consumed and emissions.

Energy Conservation in Utility Production – Numerous energy conservation projects have been implemented in the MU power plant including use of high efficiency motors, variable speed drives, recycling of waste water, use of advanced digital process controls to optimize plant efficiency, and increased heat recovery in the generation of steam.

Alternate Fuels

·        Tire Derived Fuel – The MU power plant is blending up to 10% Tire Derived Fuel with coal through a partnership with the Missouri Department of Corrections and the Missouri Department of Energy.  This program results in the annual removal of up to 350,000 tires from Missouri waste tire dump sites.  Since 1998, MU has burned over 3 million scrap tires.  The program saves up to $300,000 per year in fuel costs. 

More information about CF — EM’s TDF program is available at http://www.cf.missouri.edu/energy/em_renewable/tdf.html

·        Corn Cobs – We partnered with MU’s College of Agriculture and Extension to burn a blend of corn cobs with coal.  Preliminary testing of a 2-3% blend was completed.

·        Wood Chips - This year, up to 5 percent of the coal supply will be replaced with waste wood chips, saving more than 7,000 tons of greenhouse gas emissions.  Waste wood chips may be a steady biomass fuel source for MU in the future.  Using biomass fuel saves MU $50,000 annually, supports the local economy, annually reduces shipping miles by 90,000, and saves approximately 16,000 gallons of diesel fuel.

·        Bio-Diesel We are using a bio-diesel blend of fuel in our equipment where applicable at no additional cost.  This fuel burns cleaner than pure diesel fuel and helps the local economy.

University of Missouri – Columbia

Campus Facilities Energy Management Awards

Ø  1995 US EPA Green Lights University Partner of the Year Award for progress in upgrading lighting, and promoting energy efficiency.

Ø  1996 National Association of College and University Business Officers Award for the implementation of an innovative wholesale electricity purchasing program.

Ø  1997 MU was selected from among 1,400 participants for the first US EPA's and US Department of Energy's Energy Star Buildings Partner of the Year Award , an honor for excellence in using energy more efficiently, saving money and improving the environment.

Ø  1998 Missouri Governor’s Award for Quality and Productivity recognizing the teamwork between the MU Campus Facilities Energy Management Department, Missouri Department of Corrections, and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources with the Tire Derived Fuel Program.

 Ø  1998 Governor’s Pollution Prevention Award for MU’s overall approach to the production, use, and conservation of energy.

Ø  1998 National Council of State Governments’ Award for Innovation for innovative use of tire derived fuel. 

Ø  1999 EPA’s Energy Star Label Buildings awarded for University Hall and the General Services Building.  These buildings are the first office buildings on any university campus to earn this recognition.

Ø  1999 top member of the EPA’s Honor Society of Energy Star Buildings Partners for our success in the program.

Ø  2000 Missouri Waste Coalition Achievement Award for MU’s contributions towards improved waste management practices and wise use of natural resources in our state with the Tire Derived Fuel Program.

Ø  2001 EPA’s Energy Star Partner of the Year Award received second time by MU for commitment to energy management practices in using efficient lighting and HVAC systems across campus and for its dedication to stringent energy efficiency requirements in all new construction.  MU first received the award in 1997.

Ø  2003 EPA’s Combined Heat and Power Award for recognition of efficiency and associated environmental benefits of MU’s combined heat and power facility.

Ø  2004 International District Energy Association’s System of the Year Award for recognition of MU’s exemplary operating performance, reliability, efficiency, and excellence in providing energy services.

Ø  2008 National Wildlife Federation’s Energy Efficiency Award - Chill Out: Campus Solutions to Global Warming for recognition of MU’s efforts in energy conservation and efficiency.

Ø  2008 Missouri Waste Control Coalition’s Outstanding Achievement Award - in the Government category for its joint, “tires-to-energy” recycling program.

 

ENERGY CONSERVATION
28) Do you facilitate programs that encourage members of the campus community to reduce energy use (e.g., cash incentives, signs reminding individuals to turn off lights and appliances)?
[  ]  No
[x] Yes. Please describe: There are signs on light-switches in certain buildings as well as flyers on a bulletin boards. Campus Facilities Energy Management sends out conservation tips on the campus mass email. Posters and table tents are placed in residence and dining halls regularly. This past spring there was a week long energy conservation competition held in three resident halls on campus. This competition centered around the Building Dashboard program, http://mizzoudashboard.missouri.edu , which is a real-time energy monitoring system that displays a buildings energy consumption on a user-friendly website.

RENEWABLE ENERGY GENERATION
29)  Does your school generate renewable electricity?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please specify percentage of overall electricity generated from each of the following sources and describe details below.
[    %]  B100 biodiesel
[   4%]  Clean biomass
[    %]  Concentrating solar power (CSP)
[    %]  Geothermal
[    %]  Low-impact hydropower
[    %]  Solar photovoltaics
[    %]  Wind
[    %]  Other
Description: This year, up to 4 percent of the coal supply will be replaced with waste wood chips, saving more than 7,000 tons of greenhouse gas emissions.  Waste wood chips may be a steady biomass fuel source for MU in the future.  Using biomass fuel saves MU $50,000 annually, supports the local economy, annually reduces shipping miles by 90,000, and saves approximately 16,000 gallons of diesel fuel.


30)  Does your school have solar hot water systems?
[ x ]  No
[  ]  Yes. Please specify number of systems and total BTUs generated annually, if available:

RENEWABLE ENERGY PURCHASE
31) Has your school purchased electric energy from renewable sources or renewable energy credits (RECs)?
RECs and electricity from renewable sources must be Green-e certified or meet the requirements of the Green-e standard.
[ x ]  No
[  ]  Yes. Please describe.
Date of most recent contract:
Quantity (kWh):
Percentage of your total electric energy use that it represents:

32) Has your school purchased non-electric energy from renewable sources?
[ x ]  No
[  ]  Yes. Please describe. 
Date of most recent contract:
Quantity (BTUs):
Percentage of your total non-electric energy use that it represents:

ON-SITE COMBUSTION
33) Please provide total BTUs of energy for heating and cooling from on-site combustion:

The University uses highly efficient Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies to produce both thermal energy (heating and cooling) and electricity for the MU campus.  As such, we are unable to simply represent our energy production solely in BTU.  MU is a partner in EPA’s Energy Star CHP program and that MU been recognized by EPA under this program for utilizing highly efficient technologies reducing both fuel consumption and emissions compared to conventional separate thermal and power systems.


34) Please list each fuel source (e.g., coal, natural gas, oil) and the percent of overall BTUs derived from that source:

FY09 – 94% Coal, 4% Biomass (Wood/Chipped Tires/Ag Crops), Natural Gas 2%


35) Is any on-site combustion for heating and cooling derived from renewable sources?

[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please describe. Wood chips
Percentage on-site combustion derived from renewable sources: [ 4  %]
Total BTUs of energy generated from renewable sources: [#      ]
Description of renewable energy sources used for on-site combustion for heating and cooling: Wood/Chipped Tires/Ag Crops

FOOD & RECYCLING
The food portion of this category is covered in a separate dining survey.
RECYCLING OF TRADITIONAL MATERIALS
36) Please indicate which traditional materials your institution recycles (check all that apply).

[  ]  None
[ x ]  Aluminum
[ x ]  Cardboard
[ x ]  Glass
[ x ]  Paper
[  ]  Plastics (all)
[ x ]  Plastics (some)
[ x ]  Other. Please list: Steel, cast iron, and used motor oil

37) Diversion rate: [ 25   %]

RECYCLING OF ELECTRONIC WASTE
38) Does your institution have an electronics recycling program?

[  ]  No
[ x]  Yes. If available, please indicate the total annual weight or volume of each material collected for recycling or reuse.
[   x ]  Batteries                       1.28 tons
[   x ]  Cell phones                   Weight not available
[  x ]  Computers                     62 tons 
[  x  ]  Lightbulbs                    12.6 tons 
[  x ]  Printer cartridges           .8 tons 
[    ]  Other E-waste. Please list:

COMPOSTING (ASIDE FROM DINING FACILITIES)
39) What percentage of your campus's landscaping waste is composted or mulched?

[ 95 %]  76 tons

40) Do you provide composting receptacles around campus in locations other than dining halls (e.g., in residence halls, offices, academic buildings)?
[  ]  No
[  x]  Yes. Please describe:

We have 16, 2 yd. green waste dumpsters that go to the city’s composting operation weekly..

SOURCE REDUCTION
41) Do you have any source-reduction initiatives (e.g., end-of-semester furniture or clothing swaps and collections)?

[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please describe: Tiger Treasures is a project that collects 17 tons of clothing, electronics, appliances and furniture from the residence hall move out in the spring. The sale takes place in our football stadium and is attended by over 2500 people. $17,000 is raised for distribution to service agencies who supply most of the volunteers. http://www.cf.missouri.edu/tigertreasures/index.html

The Textiles and Apparels Management department does a used clothes drive and makes prom dresses out of reused cloth to give to high school girls who cannot afford a dress.

GREEN BUILDING
GREEN BUILDING POLICY
42) Does your school have a formal green building policy?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please describe policy and provide URL to the full policy, if available:

In the University’s Master Plan it states that:

The University of Missouri campus contains over 6 million gross square feet (GSF) of building space classified as Educational & General (E&G) housing teaching, research and administrative support. Nearly 70 percent of this space is over 30 years old and over 40 percent exceeds 50 years. These older structures constitute a resource that, in future years, will prove exceptionally valuable to MU. That value can be realized by a partnership of campus interests dedicated to achieving the most effective use of existing facilities to further MU's academic mission.

New E&G space represents 25 percent of the total building area added to the campus since 1980. Student activity functions, residential, athletic, medical, research and parking facilities constitute most of the building area growth during this period. Like other U.S. flagship universities, MU's expansion was a response to a host of demands for services and support activities to maintain its mission and comply with changing standards and mandates.

Challenging economic climate

In the current economic climate, new facilities construction has slowed and will remain so for the indefinite future. A scarcity of public and private funds for capital development affects U.S. institutions of higher education.

The new construction slowdown presents a challenging opportunity for MU's academic mission leaders and facilities managers to collaborate in giving new purpose to these older resources with the following shared goals in mind:

·         alleviate the need for new buildings, other than those required to meet critical mission priorities

·         accommodate MU's academic mandates in more efficient, sustainable ways

·         reposition existing facilities with a minimum increase in operating cost

·         preserve historical investments already made in the campus environment

·         further MU's strong stewardship of campus facilities

·         advance the state's economic health

Renovations preserve resources

Thirty-four campus buildings have been identified as priority candidates for renovation. While age and obsolescence make them prime choices for renovation, their resource value to MU is paramount: These buildings occupy key locations in the historic fabric of MU; many are irreplaceable icons essential to the campus' unique character; many are among the university's most heavily used academic buildings; and, comprising two million square feet, the buildings represent one-third of MU's total inventory of E&G space.

A comprehensive renovation strategy is critically important in remedying deferred maintenance, new code requirements, and mechanical, spatial, material and occupant- comfort deficiencies that come with aging buildings.

The renovation investment can also be leveraged in other ways. Where it proves economically impractical to maintain old uses, space can be adapted and reprogrammed for new uses. Departments with space scattered across the campus can be consolidated in renovated buildings and some renovated facilities can be expanded with additions rather than building wholly new structures. Recent examples of this include Townsend, Schweitzer and Lafferre halls, and the Reynolds Journalism Institute. Where renovation candidates no longer utilize prime sites to greatest effect, those sites can be redeveloped for new uses. Combinations of these measures will represent a high level of campus stewardship and sustainability.

Through a rigorous determination of MU's mission and needs, administrative and academic leadership will ultimately determine which uses and programs will occupy renovated E&G buildings. The MU Campus Master Plan can provide the university with sound planning principles and stewardship guidance in making older campus buildings its newest resources for the future.

University of Missouri Sustainable Design Policy

http://www.cf.missouri.edu/pdc/sustainabledesignpolicy.html

 

The University of Missouri recognizes the value of sustainable capital project development in order to meet today’s needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.

 It is the policy of the University of Missouri to incorporate sustainability principles and concepts in the design of all facilities and infrastructure projects to the fullest extent possible, while being consistent with budget constraints, appropriate life cycle cost analysis and customer priorities. This policy applies to renovation and new construction regardless of funding source or amount; to projects accomplished both in-house and through A/E contracts; and to designs associated with all construction methods.

 

Environmental concepts that guide sustainably designed projects are:

• Sustainable Sites: Meet or exceed State of Missouri DNR best management practices for erosion and sedimentation control standards. Accommodate alternative transportation methods.

• Water Efficiency: Target water efficient landscaping, reduced water usage, and innovative stormwater management.

• Energy and Atmosphere: Encourage optimal energy performance, including appropriate levels of commissioning.

• Materials and Resources: Support construction waste management programs. Provide space for building-based recycling program. Encourage use of local and regionally-produced materials and building products made with recycled content.

• Indoor Environmental Quality: Pursue toxin-free indoor air through appropriate ventilation and use of building materials that emit low levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

The University will not typically seek certification of projects through the USGBC Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) process. However, the design of University buildings should strive to achieve an equivalent LEED-certified level while supporting goals stated above. In special cases, specific projects may seek LEED certification if campus goals and budget align.

 

GREEN BUILDING STANDARDS
43)
Please indicate LEED-certified buildings.
[#  0   ]  Total number of LEED-certified buildings.
[   0 sq ft]  Certified-level (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:
[   0 sq ft]  Silver-level (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:
[   0 sq ft]  Gold-level (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:
[   0 sq ft]  Platinum-level (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:

44) Please indicate buildings that meet LEED certification criteria but are not certified.
[#     0 ]  Total number of buildings that meet LEED criteria
[   0 sq ft]  Certified-level criteria met, but not certified (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:
[   0 sq ft]  Silver-level criteria met, but not certified (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:
[   0 sq ft]  Gold-level criteria met, but not certified (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:
[   0 sq ft]  Platinum-level criteria met, but not certified (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:

45) Please indicate buildings that are ENERGY STAR labeled.
[# 2 ]  Total number of ENERGY STAR buildings. Please list building names:

University Hall and General Services Building are Energy Star Labeled buildings.
[   131,703 sq ft]  Combined gross square footage.

RENOVATIONS AND RETROFITS
46) Please indicate LEED-EB certified buildings.
[#     0 ]  Total number of LEED-EB certified buildings. Please list building names:
[   0 sq ft]  Combined gross square footage.

47) Please indicate buildings that meet LEED-EB certification criteria but are not certified.
[#     0 ]  Total number of buildings that meet LEED-EB criteria but are not certified. Please list building names:
[   0 sq ft]  Combined gross square footage.

48) Please indicate renovated buildings that are ENERGY STAR labeled.
[#    2  ]  Total number of renovated buildings that are ENERGY STAR labeled. Please list building names:
[131,703 sq ft]  Combined gross square footage of University Hall and the General Services Building.

49) What energy-efficiency technologies have you installed in existing buildings (e.g., HVAC systems, motion sensors, ambient light sensors, T5 lighting, LED lighting, timers, laundry technology)?   
For each technology, please indicate the number and type of fixtures installed, and the number of buildings in which those fixtures are installed. If possible, include either the percentage of the overall campus fixtures each type represents or the percentage of overall maintained building space that has been renovated with the technology (e.g., 20 buildings representing 10 percent of maintained building space have been retrofitted with motion sensors; thus, 10 percent of the total maintained building space in square feet would be the desired data).  

HVAC systems are controlled by a Building Automation system(BAS) in 80% of campus buildings, 99% of exterior lighting and 90% of interior lighting have been upgraded to high efficiency lighting systems, all incandescent exit signs have been replaced with LED, Daylight harvesting and dimming of interior lights with daylight sensors have been installed in a few buildings, motion sensors have been installed in thousands of classrooms, offices and labs to turn off lights and setback temperatures during unoccupied times, window film has been installed on a few buildings to reduce radiant heat during the summer months, and free cooling is used during the winter months to cool process and research loads across campus in lieu of running mechanical refrigeration.

 

50) What water-conservation technologies have you installed in existing buildings (e.g., low-flow faucets, low-flow showerheads, waterless urinals, dual-flush toilets, gray water systems, laundry technology)?   
For each technology, please indicate the number and type of fixtures installed, and the number of buildings in which those fixtures are installed. If possible, include either the percentage of the overall campus fixtures each type represents or the percentage of overall maintained building space that has been renovated with the technology (e.g., 20 buildings representing 10 percent of the maintained building space have been retrofitted with low-flow faucets; thus, 10 percent of the total maintained building space in square feet would be the desired data).   

In 1995 there was a mandate that all new plumbing fixtures be of the low flow design, i.e. 1.6 gallon flow for closets and 1.0 gallon or less for urinals. Campus growth since that time means that 40% additional footage has been added by new construction. So 40% of our buildings at a minimum have water conserving features, nearly six million square feet. All building renovations have water conservation fixtures.

On the utility side waste water cooling has been reduced by connecting process loads to the chilled water loop.

 

51) What percentage of your institution's non-hazardous construction and demolition waste is diverted from landfills?
[    25 %]

STUDENT INVOLVEMENT
RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITIES
52) Are there any sustainability-themed residential communities or housing options at your school?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please provide details below.
Name of program: Environmental Entrepreneurship Freshman Interest Group
Type of community (e.g., hall, building, house):  Freshman Interest Group
Number of students involved: 20
Additional details:

NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION
53) Does a portion of your new student orientation specifically cover sustainability?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please describe how sustainability is incorporated (e.g., information sessions, green tour): Summer Welcome is provided to all incoming freshmen. The entire campus is toured by Summer Welcome leaders. These leaders are educated about sustainability features on campus and provided with a bookmark to give to each student that references our sustainable website.

INTERNSHIPS/OUTREACH OPPORTUNITIES
54) Does your school offer on-campus office-based sustainability internships or jobs for students?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please provide number of students and average number of hours worked weekly per student:
[#  2  ]  Paid positions. Average hours worked weekly per student: 20 hrs/week

[#  6  ]  Paid positions. Average hours worked weekly per student: 5 hrs/week
[#     ]  Unpaid positions. Average hours worked weekly per student:

55) Does your school have residence hall Eco-Reps or other similar programs to promote behavioral change on campus?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please provide details below, and indicate URL if available:
[#  15   ]  Paid positions. Average hours worked weekly per student: 5 hours.
[#     ]  Positions that award academic credit. Average hours worked weekly per student:
[#     ]  Uncompensated positions. Average hours worked weekly per student:

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
56) Does your school have active student-run organizations devoted to sustainability efforts on campus?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please provide total number of active organizations, names of organizations, a brief description of each, and URLs, if available:

5 Active Organizations:

Sustain Mizzou

Description: Sustain Mizzou is a non-partisan 501 (c) 3 non-profit organization run by student volunteers at the University of Missouri-Columbia. Our mission is to promote a sustainable way of life at the University of Missouri-Columbia through education, cooperation, and local action regarding the environment.

Website: http://www.sustainmizzou.org

Greeks Going Green

Description: Greeks Going Green is an organization for greek students who are interested in environmental activism

Website: N/A

Emerging Green Builders

Description: Emerging Green Builders are students and young professionals dedicated to becoming and recruiting the future leaders of the green building movement.

Website: http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=116

Environmental Science Club

Description: The purpose of Environmental Science Club is to develop students as professionals in the environmental science field and raise awareness of science-related issues that concern soil, air and water. Website: N/A

Weatherization Columbia

Description: The mission of Weatherization Mizzou is to use weatherization techniques to provide insulation and energy-saving applications to the homes of Columbia residents who are elderly and/or in poverty free of charge, as well as provide educational resources to all Columbia citizens. This allows us to provide the residents with more comfortable living conditions, cuts energy usage and bills, as well as establishes a positive relationship between the Columbia Community and MU students.

Website: http://www.lifesizeusersgroup.com/jmk2n5/

SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGES AND COMPETITIONS


57) Does your school organize any sustainability challenges/competitions for your campus and/or with other colleges?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please list details for all competitions.
Name of competition: Mizzou Dashboard
Year initiated: 2008-2009
Frequency of competition: Once a semester
Participants: Residential Halls
Incentives: N/A
Goal of competition: To educate students about energy conservation principles and practices and to lower the energy consumption of residential halls
Percent of energy/water/waste reduced: 3%
Lasting effects of competition:
Website: http://mizzoudashboard.missouri.edu

Name of competition: RecycleMania
Year initiated: 2006
Frequency of competition: Once a year
Participants: Entire Campus
Incentives: N/A
Goal of competition: To educate students about waste and recycling practices and reduce the amount of waste that is not recycled on campus
Percent of energy/water/waste reduced: 25% of waste recycled. Placed 13 th in the Guerilla Component in 2009
Lasting effects of competition: People are more aware of our recycling programs.
Website: http://www.recyclemania.org/


TRANSPORTATION
CAMPUS MOTOR FLEET

58) How many vehicles are in your institution's fleet?
[# 948 ]

59) Please list the number of alternative-fuel vehicles in each class.
[# 2 ]  Hybrid. Please list makes and models:
[# 0 ]  Electric. Please describe type of vehicles:
[# 0]  Biodiesel. Please describe type of vehicles and list biodiesel blend(s) used:
[#77 ]  Other. Please describe: E-85 vehicles.

 

60) What is the average GHG emission rate per passenger mile of your institution's motorized fleet?
[# .537] pounds of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) per passenger mile traveled. (variables used 4,232,793 miles,  413,462 gallons 5.5 lbs. CO2 equivalent/gallon)

LOCAL TRANSPORTATION ALTERNATIVES
61) Does your school offer incentives for carpooling?
[  ]  N/A. Please explain:
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please describe details of the program including the type of the incentive and eligible community members (e.g., faculty, staff, students):

A university owned vehicle travels between Columbia and Boonville carrying up to 8 people. Some university employees use the state Rideshare Program to carpool. This system is being promoted to reach a wider audience.

62) Does your school offer public transportation subsidies?
[  ]  N/A. Please explain:
[  ]  No
[ X ]  Yes. Please describe the program including the size of the discount (as a percent of full price) and eligible community members (e.g., faculty, staff, students):

Students get half off their fare on city busses that go from campus to city locations and back. The subsidy is supported by parking and transportation funds.

63) Does your school provide free transportation around campus?
[  ]  N/A. Please explain:
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please describe: Free Bus system / Shuttle Bus Service is available Monday through Friday when classes are in session during fall and winter semesters only. Limited service is available during registration. Fares are subsidized by parking and transportation funds.

 

64) Does your school operate a free transportation shuttle to local off-campus destinations?
[  ]  N/A. Please explain:
[  ]  No
[ X ]  Yes. Please describe: Free bus service is provided to two off campus housing units that have high student populations.

 

BICYCLE PROGRAM
65) Does your school offer a bicycle-sharing/rental program or bicycle repair services?
[  ]  No
[  X]  Yes. Please provide details below.
Year created:
Number of bikes available:
Fees for participation:
Repair services provided: Sustain Mizzou, a student group organizes a bike fair in the spring where repair services are taught. Student Affairs provides funding for this program.

CAR-SHARING PROGRAM
66) Does your school partner with a car-sharing program?

[ x ]  No
[  ]  Yes. Please provide details below.
Year created:
Total number of vehicles:
Number of hybrid vehicles:
Fee for membership:

PLANNING
67) Does your school have policies that support a pedestrian-friendly or bike-friendly campus (e.g., in the school's master plan, a policy prohibiting vehicles from the center of campus)?

[  ]  N/A. Please explain:
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes. Please describe: In the University Master Plan Pedestrian Dominance is listed as a Planning Principle to maintain a pedestrian-dominant campus recognizing and gracefully accommodating the need for bicycles and vehicles. Three central campus streets are closed off from 8:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. each day classes are held to make the campus more friendly to walking and bicycling.

68) What percentage of individuals commute to campus via environmentally preferable transportation (e.g., walking, bicycling, carpooling, using public transit)?
[   30  %]

STATISTICS
69) Campus setting:
[  ]  Rural
[  ]  Suburban
[ x ]  Urban
[  ]  Other. Please describe:

70)  Total number of buildings: [#    220     ]
71)  Combined gross square footage of all buildings: [#    14 million     ]
72)  Full-time enrollment (undergraduate and graduate): [#    25,513     ]
73)  Part-time enrollment (undergraduate and graduate): [#    4,687     ]
74)  Part-time enrollment as a proportion to a full-time course load: [#  16%       ]
75)  Percent of full-time students that live on campus: [26.1%]

Questions 76-87 are for informational purposes only; responses will NOT be included in the Report Card evaluation process.

OTHER AREAS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGAGEMENT
Please mark an "X" next to each item that applies to your institution.
76)  Outdoors club: [ x ]
77)  Disposable water bottle ban: [  ]
78)  Participation in Recyclemania: [ x ]
79)  Student trustee position: [ x ]
80)  Environmental science/studies major: [ x ]
81)  Environmental science/studies minor or concentration: [ x ]
82)  Graduate-level environmental program: [  ]
83)  Student green fee: [ x ]
84)  Alumni green fund: [  ]
85)  Revolving loan fund for sustainability projects: [  ]
86)  Campus garden or farm: [ x ]
87)  Single-stream recycling: [  ]

 

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