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Report Card 2011

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Dickinson College

Campus Survey

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With the publication of the College Sustainability Report Card 2011, more than 1,100 school survey responses from over 300 institutions are now available online. In total, these surveys offer more than 10,000 pages of data collected from colleges and universities during the summer of 2010 . To access surveys from other schools, go to the  surveys section  of the website. To see grades, or to access additional surveys submitted by this school, please click the "Back to Report Card" link at the beginning or end of the survey.

 

School name: Dickinson College

Date submitted: September 30, 2010

 

ADMINISTRATION

 

SUSTAINABILITY POLICIES

 

1)  Does your school have its own formal sustainability policy and/or sustainability plan? Check all that apply.

[  ]  No

[  ]  Yes, a sustainability policy. Please describe and provide the URL below.

[X]  Yes, a sustainability plan. Please describe and provide the URL below.

 

Description: Dickinson College has made a comprehensive, institution wide commitment to advance sustainability in our educational programs, scholarship, campus operations, financial management, and student life, as well as in the communities in which we study, work, and live (http://www.dickinson.edu/about/sustainability/). The College has implemented, and continues to implement, steps in each of these areas. The steps that we are taking to advance sustainability have emerged over the past two decades through the combined efforts of many different campus constituencies and senior leadership. Our Strategic Plan (http://www2.dickinson.edu/plan/) and Campus Master Plan (http://www.dickinson.edu/about/offices/campus-operations/content/Campus-Master-Plan/) identify sustainability as a defining characteristic of Dickinson College that guides current programs and planning for the future. This is reflected in our construction of all new buildings and major renovations to meet LEED Silver standards or better, use of waste vegetable oil as the primary heating fuel in our central energy plant, installation of over 80 kW of solar photovoltaic capacity, production of 100+ gallons per week of biodiesel fuel from waste vegetable oil, purchase of renewable energy credits equal to 100% of our electricity consumption, commitment to become climate neutral by 2020, operation of a sustainably managed farm to provide healthy food for the campus, composting all food waste and other biodegradable waste from the dining hall at the farm for use as a soil nutrient, working with local communities to support environmentally sound watershed management and transportation policies, integrating sustainability across the curriculum, and many other initiatives.

 

2)  Has the president of your institution signed any commitments related to environmental stewardship and/or greenhouse gas reductions? Check all that apply.

[  ]  None

[X]  American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC)

[X]  Talloires Declaration
[  ]  Other. Please describe:


3)  Is there a sustainability component in your institution's master plan and/or strategic plan? Check all that apply.
[  ]  No
[X]  Yes, in the master plan. Please describe and provide the URL below.

[X]  Yes, in the strategic plan. Please describe and provide the URL below.

 

Description: Master Plan: Yes. Dickinson’s most recent Master Plan, adopted in 2008, identifies 8 goals for planning campus facilities, four of which incorporate sustainability values (http://www.dickinson.edu/about/offices/campus-operations/content/Campus-Master-Plan/).  The sustainability related goals are:• Goal 3: Create a global campus that is infused with internationalism and that demonstrates Dickinson’s commitment to inclusiveness, pluralism, and democracy;• Goal 4: Foster good citizenship by connecting students with the wider world with ties that are reflective, reciprocal and helpful to the wider world;• Goal 6: Create a campus culture that is committed to ecological sustainability, both operationally and academically and integrate environmental accountability into decision-making and planning across all college functions; and• Goal 7: Instill a culture of prudent use of resources and respect for the natural world that supports civilized society and make the campus a living example of sustainability. Strategic Plan: Yes. Sustainability is one of six defining characteristics noted in Dickinson’s strategic plan (http://www2.dickinson.edu/plan/). Our objectives under the defining characteristic of sustainability are to recognize that engaged global citizenship requires an awareness of, and respect for, the natural world that supports the social world; that responsible citizenry requires prudent use of resources of all types, physical and fiscal; that educating for sustainability requires a holistic approach to decision making which embodies liberal arts education and promotes an engaged community; and that the College must serve as a living example of sustainability in all arenas.

 

ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEES

 

4)  Does your school have any administrative councils, committees or task forces that advise on and/or implement sustainability policies and programs?

You may provide detailed information for up to three committees. If you have one advisory committee that is broken down into subcommittees, please indicate that you have one committee and answer the questions on the following page for the entire committee (the sum of data for all subcommittees).

Yes

 

Please provide the number of committees: Three committees

 

Committee I

 

5)  Please provide the name of the committee and note the number of meetings held since August 2009.

 

Committee name: President's Commission on Environmental Sustainability

Number of meetings: Two

 

6)  Please provide the number of stakeholder representatives on the committee.

When providing the data on each stakeholder group, you should provide the total number across all subcommittees (you do not need to numerate individual tallies for subcommittees).

 

 

 

Number of representatives

Administrators

 

7

Faculty

 

3

Staff

 

1

Students

 

2

Other. Please describe.   

 

alumni, 1

 

7)  Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents.

 

 

 

Name       

 

Position

Chair 1   

 

Neil Leary  

 

Administrator

Chair 2

 

   

 

Chair 3

 

   

 

 

8)  To whom does the committee report?
[X]  President/Chancellor
[  ]  Vice President/Vice Chancellor
[  ] Other:

 

9)  Please indicate the key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2009. For each issue addressed, please indicate and describe progress made.
“Moderate” progress indicates that issues were discussed thoroughly and projects are in the early stages of planning. “Significant” progress indicates that new policies or programs were implemented, or are in the final stages of planning and approval.

 

 

 

Addressed       

 

Progress     

 

Description

Academics

Examples: minor, major and concentration programs, curricular additions, research projects

 

[  ]

 

 

Administration

Examples: procurement policies, institution-wide sustainability policy, sustainability-related staff positions

 

[X]

 

Moderate

 

The commission provides a senior level forum for strategic planning for sustainability, advising the college president about sustainability related policies, and sharing of information about sustainability activities and achievements. The commission established a sustainability reporting process for all divisions of the college (draft reports completed). On the advice of the Commission, responsibility for coordination of campus sustainability and sustainability education have been consolidated under the Center for Environmental and Sustainability Education and 1.5 FTE staff positions were added to the Center in 2010.

Climate

Examples: draft climate action plan, greenhouse gas emissions inventory

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Dickinson’s Climate Change Action Plan was submitted to the Commission in fall 2009 for review and recommendation. Upon the recommendation of the Commission, the plan was approved by the President and submitted to AASHE in September 2009, fulfilling one of our commitments as a signatory of the ACUPCC. The plan sets 2020 as our target date for becoming a climate neutral campus.

 

Endowment

Examples: proxy voting guidelines, investment advisory committees

 

[  ]

 

 

Energy

Examples: conservation/behavioral change programs, retrofits and efficiency improvements

 

[  ]

 

 

Food

Examples: policies to increase purchase of local/sustainably produced foods, implementing campus gardens

 

[  ]

 

 

Green Building

Examples: design or construction policy

 

[  ]

 

 

Student Involvement

Examples:  speaker series, peer-to-peer residential sustainability education programs, student guide to sustainable living on campus

 

[  ]

 

 

Transportation

Examples: incentives for use of environmentally-preferable commuting options, campus fleet improvements, connecting students with public transit     

 

[  ]

 

 

Waste Reduction

Examples: recycling, composting, reducing consumption

 

[  ]

 

 

 

Water

Examples: water conservation, reducing campus pollution, bottled water campaigns

 

[  ]

 

 

Other

 

[  ]

 

 

 

Committee II

 

5b)  Please provide the name of the committee and note the number of meetings held since August 2009.

 

Committee name: Dickinson Society Advocating Environmental Sustainability (SAVES)

Number of meetings: 14

 

6b)  Please provide the number of stakeholder representatives on the committee.

When providing the data on each stakeholder group, you should provide the total number across all subcommittees (you do not need to numerate individual tallies for subcommittees).

 

 

 

Number of representatives

Administrators

 

7

Faculty

 

2

Staff

 

5

Students

 

10

Other. Please describe.     

 

SAVES meetings are open to anyone who would like to attend.  Above numbers are indicative ofa typical SAVES meetings

 

7b)  Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents.

 

 

 

Name      

 

Position

Chair 1    

 

Kate Consroe

 

Administrator

Chair 2

 

 

Chair 3

 

 

 

8b)  To whom does the committee report?
[  ]  President/Chancellor
[  ]  Vice President/Vice Chancellor
[X]  Other:  President's Commission on Environmental Sustainability and the President's staff

 

9b)  Please indicate the key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2009. For each issue addressed, please indicate and describe progress made.
“Moderate” progress indicates that issues were discussed thoroughly and projects are in the early stages of planning. “Significant” progress indicates that new policies or programs were implemented, or are in the final stages of planning and approval.

 

 

 

Addressed  

 

Progress 

 

Description

Academics

Examples: minor, major and concentration programs, curricular additions, research projects

 

[  ]

 

 

 

Administration

Examples: procurement policies, institution-wide sustainability policy, sustainability-related staff positions

 

[X]

 

Moderate

 

SAVES acts as a forum for sharing information, developing ideas for action, facilitating collaboration across administrative units and campus constituencies, and advocating for changes that advance sustainability. SAVES does not implement programs itself, but its members do and the committee helps to create an enabling, participatory environment for collective action. Progress on various issues/programs described in this table are not the result of direct action by SAVES per se, but are areas in which SAVES facilitated progress and provided a channel for dialogue among students, staff, faculty and administrators.

Climate

Examples: draft climate action plan, greenhouse gas emissions inventory

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

SAVES was a key forum for discussion of and input to the Climate Change Action Plan.

Endowment

Examples: proxy voting guidelines, investment advisory committees

 

[  ]

 

 

Energy

Examples: conservation/behavioral change programs, retrofits and efficiency improvements

 

[X]

 

Moderate

 

SAVES facilitated progress on a number of energy initiatives, including installation of new solar pv arrays in 2009-2010 at the Center for Sustainable Living (a student residence building) and the library, sending a delegation of Dickinson students and faculty to the Solar Scholars conference, going tray-less in the dining hall, and converting central energy plant boilers to burn waste vegetable oil in place of #2 heating oil.

Food

Examples: policies to increase purchase of local/sustainably produced foods, implementing campus gardens

 

[X]

 

Moderate

 

A food subcommittee of SAVES helped raise awareness of a variety of food issues this past year and explored options with dining services staff for increasing local, sustainable, and organic offerings in the dining hall and providing greater information about nutrition and sources of our food. Partly as a result of the work of the subcommittee, a student intern position has been created for fall 2010 for developing and testing seasonal menu options. The subcommittee also was a catalyst for adopting food, health and sustainability as the theme for the yearlong Clarke Forum speaker series in 2010-2011.

Green Building

Examples: design or construction policy

 

[  ]

 

 

Student Involvement

Examples:  speaker series, peer-to-peer residential sustainability education programs, student guide to sustainable living on campus

 

[  ]

 

Significant

 

: SAVES is a key forum for promoting student involvement in sustainability efforts at Dickinson. Activities and events for which SAVES has facilitated student involvement include a new Ecorep program that will begin fall 2010, better integration of sustainability in orientation for new students, Solar Power Day, RecycleMania, Green Devil Challenge, Trash on the Plaza, swap shop, other student reuse programs, Earth Fest, the LeTort Fesitval, and 350.org Day of Action Bike Ride.

Transportation

Examples: incentives for use of environmentally-preferable commuting options, campus fleet improvements, connecting students with public transit     

 

[X]

 

Moderate

 

SAVES had input to the decision to expand the fleet of Red Bikes with the purchase of 12 bikes which are available for students and others to use for free, adding new bike racks on campus, improving shuttle service between campus and Harrisburg, promoting bike to work/walk to work events, offering wellness programs on biking and bike safety, and bringing ZipCar to campus.

Waste Reduction

Examples: recycling, composting, reducing consumption

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

SAVES had input to a new policy in 2009 to reduce paper consumption by establishing a printing fee for printing in excess of a quota of 600 pages per semester per student. SAVES also supported a new price structure for coffee that will take effect in fall 2010 and will give a discount of 50 cents per cup to buyers who use reusable mugs. In past years, SAVES was instrumental in establishing and expanding campus recycling and composting programs, which have reduced substantially the amount of material sent to the landfill. The composting program alone has reduced by 50% the volume of waste going from our dining hall to the landfill.

Water

Examples: water conservation, reducing campus pollution, bottled water campaigns

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

With support and advice from SAVES, the College dining service eliminated trays from its dining hall in 2009, a measure that is expected to reduce significantly our water and energy consumption, as well as food waste. This builds on measures advocated by SAVES and implemented in recent years that include replacement of washers and dryers in the student residence halls with Energy Star appliances that save energy and water (saving 1.25 million gallons each year), replacement of all showerheads with ultra-low flow fixtures, natural landscaping in selected parts of the campus to reduce water consumption, and installation of a swimming pool filtration system that captures evaporated water for reuse (saving 250,000 gallons per year).

Other

 

[  ]

 

 

 

Committee III

 

5c)  Please provide the name of the committee and note the number of meetings held since August 2009.

 

Committee name: Steering Committee, Center for Environmental and Sustainability Education (CESE)

Number of meetings: 6

 

6c)  Please provide the number of stakeholder representatives on the committee.

When providing the data on each stakeholder group, you should provide the total number across all subcommittees (you do not need to numerate individual tallies for subcommittees).

 

 

 

Number of representatives

Administrators

 

3

Faculty

 

6

Staff

 

2

Students

 

2

Other. Please describe.     

 

 

7c)  Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents.

 

 

 

Name      

 

Position

Chair 1    

 

Neil Leary

 

Administrator

Chair 2

 

 

Chair 3

 

 

 

8c)  To whom does the committee report?
[  ]  President/Chancellor
[  ]  Vice President/Vice Chancellor
[X]  Other:  Provost of the College

 

9c)  Please indicate the key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2009. For each issue addressed, please indicate and describe progress made.
“Moderate” progress indicates that issues were discussed thoroughly and projects are in the early stages of planning. “Significant” progress indicates that new policies or programs were implemented, or are in the final stages of planning and approval.

 

 

 

Addressed  

 

Progress  

 

Description

Academics

Examples: minor, major and concentration programs, curricular additions, research projects

 

[X]

 

Moderate

 

The CESE Steering Committee advises the Dean of the College and the Director of CESE about development and implementation of a comprehensive program that spans all divisions of Dickinson College to educate for a sustainable society. Measures that have been implemented include establishment of a faculty learning community that has resulted in 25 sustainability focused courses being added or revised (adding to >100 courses that are related to selected dimensions of sustainability); a grants program to support sustainability focused curriculum development, professional development, and student-faculty research; and creation of a Living Laboratory program that enriches classroom learning through connections to the campus and the wider world. Connections are being made through the Living Laboratory between the classroom and the college farm, campus operations, the Alliance for Aquatic Resource Monitoring, the biodiesel shop, renewable energy projects, and the local community.

Administration

Examples: procurement policies, institution-wide sustainability policy, sustainability-related staff positions

 

[  ]

 

 

Climate

Examples: draft climate action plan, greenhouse gas emissions inventory

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Advice from the Steering Committee helped CESE and Dickinson College to win award of a grant of $487,000 in 2009 from NASA to implement an interdisciplinary climate change education program that encompasses the physical sciences, social sciences and humanities. CESE will conduct curriculum and faculty development workshops in the summers of 2010 and 2011 for faculty from Dickinson College and 8 other colleges and universities.

Endowment

Examples: proxy voting guidelines, investment advisory committees

 

[  ]

 

 

Energy

Examples: conservation/behavioral change programs, retrofits and efficiency improvements

 

[  ]

 

 

Food

Examples: policies to increase purchase of local/sustainably produced foods, implementing campus gardens     

 

[  ]

 

 

Green Building

Examples: design or construction policy

 

[  ]

 

 

Student Involvement

Examples:  speaker series, peer-to-peer residential sustainability education programs, student guide to sustainable living on campus

 

[  ]

 

 

Transportation

Examples: incentives for use of environmentally-preferable commuting options, campus fleet improvements, connecting students with public transit      

 

[  ]

 

 

Waste Reduction

Examples: recycling, composting, reducing consumption

 

[  ]

 

 

Water

Examples: water conservation, reducing campus pollution, bottled water campaigns

 

[  ]

 

 

Other

 

[  ]

 

 

 

 

OFFICE OR DEPARTMENT                                  


10) Does your school have an office or department exclusively dedicated to furthering sustainability on campus? Please note: this does not include academic programs focused on sustainability.
Please provide the number of staff in the office in terms of full-time equivalent (FTE). FTE for a full-time staff member would be 1, FTE for a half-time staff member would be 0.5.

Yes

 

Please provide details below.

 

Office name: The Center for Environmental and Sustainability Education (CESE)

Year created: 2006

Description: The Center for Environmental and Sustainability Education helps make the study of the environment a defining characteristic of a Dickinson education, and to promote the integration of campus/operational, residential learning and leadership opportunities, and curricular education as holistic components of a sustainable institution. The center works to integrate environmental and sustainability education across the college curriculum and with all departments on campus. It also links classroom learning with co-curricular programs, the greening of campus operations and civic engagement.

Number of staff in office (in FTE): 3.5

 

SUSTAINABILITY STAFF

Please provide your answers to questions 11-12 in terms of full-time equivalent (FTE). For example, FTE for a half-time staff member would be 0.5.

 

11) Does your school employ a sustainability coordinator, director, or manager?

Your response may include faculty/staff who, in addition to their regular responsibilities, are overseeing campus sustainability initiatives (similar to the responsibilities of a full-time sustainability coordinator). For those faculty/staff partially assigned to sustainability work, please indicate time allotted for sustainability efforts in full-time equivalent (FTE).

Yes

 

Please provide details below.

 

Title:  Director

Department:  Center for Environmental and Sustainability Education

Time worked (in FTE):  100%

Job description:  The Director of the Center for Environmental and Sustainability Education provides leadership for integrating education for a sustainable society into Dickinson College’s curriculum and for enriching classroom sustainability education through connections with global education, co-curricular and extra-curricular programs, research, campus life, campus operations, and community service. The Director will report directly to the Provost and will chair the President’s Commission on Environmental Sustainability. The functions of the Center require the Director and staff to work in close collaboration with all academic departments and with numerous offices and organizations of the college, including the Office of Admissions, the Alliance for Aquatic Resource Monitoring (ALLARM), Campus Life, Campus Operations, the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues, the Community Studies Center, Corporate and Foundation Relations, the Dickinson College Farm, Dickinson SAVES, the Office of Global Education, the Office of Religious Life and Community Service, the Research and Development Committee, and Service Learning.     Responsibilities include:  ·       Developing a vision and plan for sustainability education;  ·       Developing and coordinating curriculum and faculty development programs for sustainability education and research;  ·       Creating and growing Dickinson’s Living Laboratory for Sustainability, a program that engages students with the College Farm, ALLARM, facilities projects, community service projects, and other activities for hands-on experiential education;  ·       Monitoring and reporting progress toward sustainability goals, including preparation of greenhouse gas inventories and actions to attain climate neutral operations;  ·       Developing and implementing a communication strategy to inform internal and external audiences about Dickinson’s sustainability values, goals, activities, and achievements;  ·       Supervising Center staff for performance of the above responsibilities; and  ·       Teaching one or two courses each year.

 

12) Please list the titles and a brief job description for all other full- and part-time staff who are engaged in planning, implementing or managing sustainability initiatives on your campus (e.g. Assistant Sustainability Coordinator, Food Services Sustainability Coordinator, Green Office Program Manager).

Your response may include faculty/staff who, in addition to their regular responsibilities, are overseeing campus sustainability initiatives (similar to the responsibilities of a full-time sustainability coordinator). For those faculty/staff partially assigned to sustainability work, please indicate time allotted for sustainability efforts (in FTE).Your response may include graduate assistants.

 

Your response should exclude academic researchers, administrative assistants, technical support staff, and recycling/compost collections staff. Your response should also exclude information about undergraduate student interns and student employees. This information should be provided in the Student Involvement section of the survey (questions 56-61).

 

Title      

 

Department      

 

Time worked (in FTE)      

 

Job description

Sustainability Educational Coordinator

 

CESE

 

100%

 

Sustainability Projects Coordinator

 

CESE

 

100%

 

Administrative Assistant

 

CESE/Organic Farm

 

100%

 

Farm Manager

 

College Organic Farm

 

100%

 

Assistant Farm Manager

 

College Organic Farm

 

100%

 

Environmental Health and Safety Officer

 

Facilities

 

100%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WEBSITE


13) Does your school have a website detailing its sustainability initiatives?

If yes, please provide URL

http://www.dickinson.edu/about/sustainability/  and  http://dickinson.edu/academics/distinctive-opportunities/environmental-and-sustainability-education/

 

GREEN PURCHASING


14) Does your school have a formal green purchasing policy?

Yes

 

If yes, please indicate the areas to which your policy pertains, and whether purchase is required or encouraged:

 

 

 

Required      

 

Encouraged      

Appliances

 

[X]

 

[  ]

Cleaning products

 

[X]

 

[  ]

Computers/electronics

 

[X]

 

[  ]

Lighting

 

[X]

 

[  ]

Office supplies

 

[X]

 

[  ]

Paper products

 

[X]

 

[  ]

Reduced packaging for purchases               

 

[X]

 

[  ]

Other. Please describe below.

 

[X]

 

[  ]


Other description: Sustainability is a core value on the campus of Dickinson College. This value permeates throughout all facets of the college, and as a result, the College does not feel the need to maintain a "top-down" policy for green purchasing. All of the decisions made by the College take sustainability into account, and appropriate purchases are made accordingly. Some examples: Facilities Management purchases Green Seal certified products when certification is available, and when it is not available, they purchase biorenewable products (from Spartan Chemical.) Facilities Management and Library Information Services seek to replace old appliances and equipment during routine maintenance and upgrades. Dining services purchases all corn-based, compostable serviceware, which is composted at the College farm. Facilities management has also implemented a series of Sustainability Standards for all repair and renovations that ensures campus systems and structures are sustainably renewed. These standards include installing waterless urinals, motion-activated sinks, low-flow showers and sinks, compact fluorescents and energy efficient lights.

 

15) Please indicate in which categories you regularly purchase ENERGY STAR qualified products. Check all that apply.  If possible, provide the percentage of products purchased that are ENERGY STAR qualified for each category.

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage purchased  

 

Description

[X]

 

Appliances

 

100%

 

[X]

 

Building products

 

100%

 

[X]

 

Computers/electronics     

 

100%

 

[X]

 

Heating and cooling

 

100%

 

[X]

 

Lighting and fans

 

100%

 

[X]

 

Plumbing

 

100%

 

 

Additional comments: Energy Star qualified products are purchased whenever the rating is applied. When Energy Star certification is not possible, we always strive to purchase the most efficient and effective product available. This is congruous with the College's Triple Bottom Line Approach.

 

16)  Does your school purchase environmentally preferable paper products (e.g., 100 percent post-consumer recycled content, certified by the Forest Stewardship Council)?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

For each of the items below, please indicate the percentage of purchases that contain post-consumer recycled content, are chlorine-free processed, and/or are Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified. Please provide approximate data, to the best of your ability, if your institution uses a decentralized purchasing structure.

               

 

 

Percentage
post-consumer
recycled content     

 

Percentage
Forest Stewardship
Council certified   

 

Percentage
chlorine-free
 processed     

 

Description

Envelopes

 

100%

 

100%

 

100%

 

Facial tissues

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

College does not provide facial tissue

Napkins

 

100%

 

100%

 

100%

 

Notepads

 

100%

 

100%

 

100%

 

Office paper

 

100%

 

100%

 

100%

 

Paper towels

 

100%

 

100%

 

100%

 

Other. Please describe.

 

 

 

 

 

Additional comments:

 

17)  Does your school purchase computers or electronics that are Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) certified?

Yes

 

If yes, please describe below.

Please indicate the portion of computer or electronics purchases that are EPEAT certified. Please provide the percentage of each product purchased that is EPEAT certified, where data are available. Note which products have been purchased in the “Product description” column (e.g., desktop computers, laptops).

 

 

 

Portion
EPEAT certified      

 

Percentage
EPEAT certified      

 

Product description (e.g. computers, printers)

Product 1

 

All

 

100

 

Whenever such certification is availible, the College purchases in accordance.

Product 2

 

All

 

 

Product 3

 

 

 

 

FUNDING MECHANISMS

 

18)  What mechanisms does your school use to fund sustainability projects on campus? Check and describe all that apply. If no specific mechanisms are in place, indicate as such and move on to question 19.

Data collected for this question is for informational purposes only and will not be evaluated for grading.

 

[  ]  No specific mechanisms are in place.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[X]

 

Alumni green fund

 

[X]

 

Capital budget

 

[X]

 

Endowment investment in on-campus sustainability projects    

 

[X]

 

Operating budget

 

[  ]

 

Revolving loan fund for sustainability projects

 

[  ]

 

Student green fee

 

[X]    

 

Other. Please describe.

 

The Student Senate funded the installation of solar photovolatic panels on the roof of the College Library.

 

EMPLOYEE OUTREACH OPPORTUNITIES

19) What programs does your school facilitate that encourage sustainable behavioral change among departments, offices, faculty and staff? Check all that apply.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[X]

 

Departmental sustainability liaisons

 

An intern in the Center for Environmental and Sustainability  Education has implemented a project called the Green Devil Agents. These department (faculty and staff) liasons are in charge of enforcing and encouraging sustainable practices in their respective offices. Responsibilities include making sure lights are turned off, ensuring proper recycling practices, contacting the appropriate campus department with issues that are impeding the implementation of sustainable practices.

[  ]

 

Green office certification program

 

[X]

 

Green office tips posted online or on staff bulletin boards

 

All lights swtiches have either a Green Devil "Turn Me Off" sticker next to them, or a "Turn Off Climate Change" sticker.

[X]

 

Incorporation of sustainability issues into new employee orientation

 

The Sustainability Education Coordinator and Director of the Center for Environmental and Sustainability Education have modules to teach new employees and faculty about the college’s sustainability initiatives during new faculty orientation, new department chair orientation, and new employee orientation services.  These modules include information about best-practice green purchasing, resources for funding and sustainability consulting at  the college, an overview of major policies, project development, and sustainability departments, and brainstorming sessions to acquire new ideas from fresh perspectives.

[X]

 

Other

 

Sustainability Wellness: Human Resources Sustainability Programs


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CLIMATE CHANGE & ENERGY

 

Please note: Unless otherwise indicated, when providing data about greenhouse gas emissions levels, please provide data based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions. Scope 1 emissions refer to GHG emissions directly resulting from sources owned or operated by the institution (e.g. on-campus combustion of fossil fuels, emissions from campus vehicles). Scope 2 emissions refer to emissions generated indirectly due to the production of electricity that the institution consumes. Scope 3 emissions refer to all other indirect emissions that result from activities of the institution (e.g. employee travel).

 

GREENHOUSE GAS INVENTORY


20)
Has your school completed a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventory? Please check all that apply.

The year the inventory was started (rather than ended) should be the year of the inventory. For example, if you began an inventory in June 2008, this would be your 2008 inventory.

[  ]  No
[  ]  In progress. Please describe status and provide estimated completion date:

[X]  Yes.  Please provide total annual GHG emissions (Scopes 1 & 2, as well as scopes 1, 2 & 3 in metric tons of CO2e). Include the start date for each year as well as the URL to each inventory, if available online, or attach the document.

 

 

Start Date         

 

Emissions level

(Scopes 1 & 2)

 

Emissions level

(Scopes 1, 2 & 3)

 

URL          

 

Notes

2009

 

June 2009    

 

13201.7

 

19665.84

 

http://acupcc.aashe.org/cap/185/>id=185

 

2008

 

June 2008

 

12799.5

 

19456.59

 

 

2007

 

June 2007

 

12651.22

 

18267.93

 

 

2006

 

June 2006

 

12227.85

 

17822.56

 

 

2005

 

June 2005

 

12833.37

 

18,409.30

 

 

 

Uploaded May2010.xlsx - 4787 KB

 

COMMITMENT TO GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTION

 

21) Has your school made a commitment to reduce GHG emissions a specific amount by a target year?

The commitment should be to reducing actual campus greenhouse gas emissions, and does not include offsets or renewable energy credits (purchase of RECs is addressed in question 31). For example, if the university is committed to reaching carbon neutrality by 2030, and aims to do so by reducing campus emissions by 50 percent and buying offsets for the remaining 50 percent, you would indicate “50%” as the reduction level.

Yes


If yes, please list details below.

 

Reduction level (percentage): 25% by 2020; 75% in 2020

Baseline year: 2008

Baseline emissions level: 19456.59

Target year: 2020; 2030

 

Additional comments: http://www.dickinson.edu/uploadedFiles/about/sustainability/content/Dickinson%20College%20Climate%20Change%20Action%20Plan%209.16.pdfThis document linked above is our climate action plan.  This report highlights our mitigation strategies, and the commitments we are making according to the President's Climate Commitment protocols.

 

REALIZED GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS

22) Has your school achieved a reduction in GHG emissions? Answer should be based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions.

Please indicate whether your school has achieved actual reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. This does not include the purchase of carbon offsets or renewable energy credits. (Purchase of RECs is considered in question 31.)

No


If yes, please list details below.

 

Percentage reduced:

Baseline year:

Baseline emissions level:

Year achieved:

 

Additional comments: The addition of the Rector Science Complex's 96,000 sq. ft. precipitated the increase in our GHG emissions for this past year.  We believe the 3% increase in emissions will be reduced in the 2010 emissions year via the conversion of the boilers in the central energy plant to burn waste vegetable oil.  This will lower our scope 1 emissions dramatically.  Additionally, we our bringing conservation efforts to the forefront of our residence halls through an eco-reps program, which aims to decrease energy usage through student outreach and programming.

 

23) Please provide GHG emissions figures in terms of gross square feet on campus for the past four years. Answers should be based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions.
Per-gross-square-foot emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total maintained building space

 

The year the inventory was started (rather than ended) should be the year of the inventory. For example, if you began an inventory in June 2008, this would be your 2008 inventory.

 

 

 

2009:

 

7.6 kg eCO2/ sq. ft.

2008:

 

8.0 kg eCO2/sq. ft.

2007:

 

7.7 "   "

2006:

 

7.5 "   "

2005:

 

7.9 "   "


24) Please provide GHG emissions figures per full-time student equivalent for the past four years. Answers should be based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions.

Per full-time student equivalent emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total number of full-time equivalent students.

 

The year the inventory was started (rather than ended) should be the year of the inventory. For example, if you began an inventory in June 2008, this would be your 2008 inventory.

 

 

 

2009:

 

5.7 MT CO2/FTE

2008:

 

5.4 MT CO2/FTE

2007:

 

5.3 "    "

2006:

 

5.2 "    "

2005:

 

5.6 "    "

 

ENERGY EFFICIENCY                                                 

 

25) Has your school achieved a reduction in building energy consumption compared to a 2005 baseline?

No


If yes, please list details below.

Data must be provided in terms of MBtus (one thousand British thermal units) .

2005 baseline year
Building energy consumption:
  10.6/kBTU/sq. ft.
Gross square feet of building space:   1,744,387/sq. ft.

Performance year (most recent year for which data are available)

Building energy consumption 10.8 kBTU/sq. ft.

Gross square feet of building space :  1,844,585/sq. ft.

26) Please indicate which programs or technologies your school has implemented to improve energy efficiency since 2000. Check all that apply.
[  ]    Cogeneration

[X]    Temperature setbacks

[  ]    Steam trap systems

 

For the following technologies and programs, please indicate the percentage of possible campus building space in which they have been implemented.

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of building space

[  ]

 

Back pressure turbines

 

30

[X]

 

Economizers

 

60

[X]

 

Energy management system; building automation system, energy information system, or monitoring-based commissioning (MBCx) system

 

30

[X]

 

Gas-fired hydronic heating systems

 

5

[X]

 

Heat recovery systems

 

1

[X]

 

LED lighting

 

12

[X]

 

Lighting sensors

 

5

[X]

 

Metering—chilled water

 

95

[X]

 

Metering—electric

 

5

[X]

 

Metering—steam

 

90

[X]

 

Other energy-efficient lighting (e.g. T5 or T8)

 

40

[X]

 

Performing system tune-ups

 

30

[X]

 

Retrocommissioning of HVAC systems (buildings must have been commissioned, retrocommissioned or re-commissioned within the last 10 years)

 

35

[  ]

 

Steam turbines

 

[X]

 

Steam-line insulation

 

35

[X]

 

Timers for temperature control

 

45

[X]

 

Variable speed drives

 

5

[  ]

 

Vending machine sensors

 

[  ]

 

Other. Please describe below.

 

 .

 

Description: -Major improvement in energy efficiency of our central energy plant by replacing boilers and other equipment in 2009-Use of an energy wheel in new Rector Science Complex (2008)-Use of day-lighting and shading of Rector (2008)-Adding insulation to 50-year old Althouse (2010)-A policy on replacing all washers and dryers with Energy Star applicances-Chancing final exam schedule to close campus for additional days during winter break (2009)-Putting unused buildings into shut-down mode during winter break (2008/09)-Implementing quotas for student printing and laundry (2009)-Eliminating trays from dining hall (2010)-Purchase of hybrid vehicles for college fleet


27) What programs does your school facilitate that encourage members of the campus community to reduce energy use? Check all that apply.

[  ]

 

Audits or investigations of individual energy use 

[  ]

 

Cash incentives for energy reductions among departments

[X]

 

Energy monitoring website or dashboard displays for buildings

[X]

 

Energy reduction competitions among departments and/or offices

[X]

 

Fume hoods in science buildings

[X]

 

Green IT policies (e.g. enabling power management)

[X]

 

PR campaigns (increased/innovative signage, newsletters, slogans, saturation), demonstrations to raise awareness, pledge drives    

[X]

 

Trade-in or rebate programs for inefficient appliances (e.g. CFLs, refrigerators)

[  ]

 

Other. Please describe:                                                           

 

RENEWABLE ENERGY GENERATION

 

28) Does your school generate renewable energy?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

Please check all types of renewable energy that are generated, and provide data on the percentage of your total energy consumption fulfilled by each renewable source listed. If less than one percent is fulfilled by a given source, leave percent box blank. For each type of renewable energy, please describe the production source.

 

 

 

Renewable
energy type

 

Percent of
total energy
consumption    

 

Production
source description

[  ]

 

Biomass

 

 

[  ]

 

Concentrated solar power

 

 

[  ]

 

Geothermal (shallow depth)

 

 

[  ]

 

Low-impact hydropower

 

 

[X]

 

Photovoltaics

 

1%

 

The production source are found in multiple areas around campus.  Solar energy is generated at our college organic farm, on the library roof, and for one of our academic buildings--Kaufman Hall.

[  ]

 

Wind

 

 

[X]

 

Other. Please specify below.    

 

 

Biodiesel Plant (on-site)

 

Other description: We also produce 50-100 gallons of biodiesel fuel from waste vegetable oil.


29) Does your school have solar hot water systems?

Yes

 

If yes, please specify number of systems and total MBtus generated annually, if available.

 

Number of systems: 3

Total MBtus generated annually: 15,000,000 BTUs/yr.

 

RENEWABLE ENERGY PURCHASE

 

30) What is the fuel mix of electricity purchased from the grid for your campus? Please provide the percentage for each source.

If less than one percent of a source is purchased, leave the percent box blank.

 

Energy source

 

Percent of total energy purchase

Coal

 

33

Natural Gas

 

22

Nuclear

 

10

Petroleum

 

18

Renewables (biomass, solar, wind, low-impact hydropower, photovoltaics, geothermal)      

 

3

Other. Please specify:

 



Percentage of overall electricity consumption purchased from the grid:


31) Has your school purchased electric energy from renewable sources or renewable energy credits (RECs)?
RECs and electricity from renewable sources must be Green-e Certified or meet the requirements of the Green-e standards .

Yes

 

If yes, please describe below.

Date of most recent purchase:   September 2009
Length of contract:   3
Average annual quantity (kWh):   18,000,000
Average percentage of your total annual electric energy use that it represents:   100

 

ON-SITE COMBUSTION

 

32) Please provide total MBtus of energy for heating and cooling generated annually from on-site combustion:

66,266.8 MMBTU's

 

33) Please list each fuel source used in on-site combustion for heating and cooling, and note the percentage of overall BTUs derived from that source:
If less than one percent of a source is purchased, leave the percent box blank.

 

Energy Source    

 

Percent of overall BTUs   

Biomass

 

Coal

 

Geothermal

 

Natural gas

 

91.2

Petroleum

 

9.8

Other. Please specify:

 

Dickinson converted the boilers in our central energy plant to burn waste vegetable oil in May 2010.  This will supply the majority of our heating needs with a renewable energy source that generates zero net-carbon emissions.  The back-up system will be run on natural gas and oil.    

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FOOD & RECYCLING

Please note: The food portion of this category and information about waste reduction in dining services is covered in a separate dining survey .

 

WASTE REDUCTION

 

34) Please provide the following information pertaining to trends in waste generation per weighted campus user.

2005 baseline year

Weighted campus users:  2,860
Total waste generated (garbage + recycling + compost):   516 MT
 

Performance year (most recent year for which data are available)
Weighted campus users:
 2,985
Total waste generated (garbage + recycling + compost):  490.3 MT

 

RECYCLING OF TRADITIONAL MATERIALS

 

35) Please indicate which traditional materials your institution recycles. Check all that apply.

[  ]

 

None

[X]

 

Aluminum

[X]

 

Cardboard

[X]

 

Glass

[X]

 

Paper

[  ]

 

Plastics (all)

[X]

 

Plastics (some)

[X]

 

Other. Please list: Motor oil, scrap metal, tires, electronics, building materials from deconstructed buildings, and waste vegetable oil for biodiesel and now for direct combustion in central energy plant    

 

36) Please indicate the campus-wide diversion rate of recyclable waste from traditional disposal.

The diversion rate should be calculated based on the diversion of traditional recyclables (paper, plastics, aluminum, cardboard, glass). Please do not include recycled electronic waste, recycled construction waste, or composted food and landscaping waste in the calculation of this figure.

The diversion rate is equal to the (total amount of traditional recycled materials) divided by the (total amount of landfill waste plus the total amount of traditional recycled materials).

30%

 

RECYCLING OF ELECTRONIC WASTE


37) Does your institution have an electronics recycling program?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

Please indicate recycling of the following items is available for students (through receptacles on campus, recycling drives, or other means), and/or for institutional electronics waste. Check all that apply.

 

 

 

For waste generated by students  

 

For waste generated by the institution

Batteries

 

[X]

 

[X]

Cell phones

 

[  ]

 

[  ]

Computers

 

[X]

 

[X]

Light bulbs

 

[X]

 

[X]

Printer cartridges

 

[X]

 

[X]

Other E-waste. Please list items:

 

[  ]

 

[  ]



If possible, describe the organization and/or company you are using to collect your e-waste for recycling, and the environmental and social safeguards that they take in disposal:

The Computer Barn, a local computer sales and repair company, reclaims our old computers and refurbishes them for future use.  Phillips, our office and print supplier, recycles our print cartridges.  Veolia Environmental Services recycles our light bulbs.

 

COMPOSTING (APART FROM DINING FACILITIES)


38) What percentage of your campus's landscaping waste is composted or mulched?

100%


39) Do you provide composting receptacles around campus in locations other than dining halls (e.g., in residence halls, offices, academic buildings)?

 

If yes, please provide details below.

[X]  

 

Academic buildings

[  ]  

 

Offices

[  ]  

 

Outdoors

[X]  

 

Residence halls

 

Description:

In the student union building, compost receptacles are located in both the dining hall and the café within this facility.  There is one compost tumbler positioned outside a residency hall for students to utilize, which serves as an educational and practical device.  A few residence halls will begin placing small containers in each dorm room for individual students to use.  The compostable material will then be sorted by the Eco-Reps and sent out to the College Farm, where most of our campus compostable material is unloaded. Dickinson College pulps and collects all biodegradable food waste from our dining hall for composting, allowing the College to eliminate an entire dumpster per day in materials going to the landfill.  As a result of this process, 600-800 lbs. per day of pulped waste is sent to the College farm to be composted and used to grow vegetables that are sent back to the Dining Hall for student consumption.

 

SOURCE REDUCTION


40) Does your campus run any source-reduction initiatives (e.g., end-of-semester furniture or clothing swaps and collections)?

Yes

 

If yes, please check and describe all of the programs below that are in place at your institution:

 

 

 

 

Description

[X]  

 

Limited printing

 

Printing Quota information can be found here:  http://www.dickinson.edu/about/offices/facilities-management/Facilities-Management/Fall-2009-Quota-Information/

[X]  

 

Move-in waste reduction

 

• Move-in waste reduction: Greening orientation efforts have been in place for 2 years.  This year Dickinson College reduced incoming student information paper waste by moving from a 30 page printed binder of orientation information mailed to all incoming students, to a 2 page informational flier which redirects students and parents to an orientation website.  This website provides information for ways to reduce waste and purchasing in preparation for the first semester.

[X]  

 

Move-out waste reduction

 

• Move-out waste reduction:  U-Turn Program has been in place since 2005. http://www.dickinson.edu/news-and-events/features/2009-10/2010-U-Turn/  Community re-use, and campus waste reduction program invites not only students, but all faculty and staff, to reuse gently used materials, furniture, electronic, and food, which is repurposed in a yard sale to raise funds for Project S.H.A.R.E.  More information is available through press releases.  http://www.dickinson.edu/news-and-events/publications/extra-features/2006-07/U-Turn-Ahead/  http://www.facebook.com/#!/group.php?gid=76351361787&ref=ts

[X]  

 

Year-round materials exchange programs     

 

Year-round materials exchange programs:  • The SAVES committee collaborated with The Treehouse in 2009-2010 to begin "TreeSwaps,” re-use stores and events hosted at the Center for Sustainable Living.  There is no formal documentation of these events: they were a paperless organization.   http://www.dickinson.edu/uploadedFiles/about/sustainability/dickinson-saves/content/Feb%202%20Minutes.doc

[X]  

 

Other

 

• We also host Seed Exchanges though the College Farm.  http://www.dickinson.edu/about/sustainability/college-farm/College-Farm/First-Annual-Regional-Seed-Exchange-Hosted-by-the-College-Farm/


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GREEN BUILDING

 

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION


41) Does your school have a formal green building policy pertaining to design and construction for new buildings and major renovations?

Yes

 

If yes, please describe policy and provide URL to the full policy, if available:

The College aims for LEED Gold certification on all new construction projects and major renovations exceeding $500,000 and is committed to a minimum certification level of LEED Silver.  Please see the website for further explanation regarding both policies at:www.dickinson.edu/about/offices/facilitiesmanagement/content/Sustainable-Operations/


42) Please provide the following information about LEED-certified buildings on your campus:

Total number of LEED-certified buildings: 2

 

 

 

Combined gross square footage:      

 

Building name(s):

Certified-level   

 

100,000  

 

Rector Science Complex and Center for Sustainable Living

Silver-level

 

 

Gold-level

 

 

Platinum-level    

 

 

 

43) Please provide information about campus buildings that meet LEED certification criteria, but are not certified.

Total number of buildings that meet LEED criteria: 1

 

 

 

Combined gross square footage:    

 

Building name(s):

Certified-level criteria met, but not certified

 

29133  

 

Althouse Hall

Silver-level criteria met, but not certified

 

   

 

Gold-level criteria met, but not certified

 

   

 

Platinum-level criteria met, but not certified   

 

   

 

 

44) Please provide information about buildings that are ENERGY STAR labeled.

Total number of ENERGY STAR buildings:  
0
Combined gross square footage:
Building names:

 

45) Please provide information about buildings on your campus that meet the standards of other third-party green building certifications (e.g. Green Globes).

Certification type:
 
Total number of buildings:
     
Combined gross square footage: 

Building names:  

 

46) For the 2009-2010 academic year, what percentage of your institution's non-hazardous construction and demolition waste was diverted from landfills?

75%

 

ADAPTIVE REUSE

 

47) Please provide information about adaptive reuse projects your campus has completed since the year 2000.

Total number of adaptive reuse projects completed since the year 2000:   5


Please provide additional details for up to ten of the most comprehensive projects:

 

Project name     

 

Square footage  

 

Former use       

 

Current use      

 

Additional details

Kaufman Hall

 

52,000

 

Manufacturing

 

Academic Building

 

Kaufmann Hall occupies a building that was a manufacturing plant for crystals used in electronics. Dickinson College took ownership of the building in [YEAR] and renovated it for classrooms and faculty offices for the departments of environmental studies, geology, and psychology. Further renovations are planned and will be implemented in phases to earn Kaufman LEED certification. The first phase, which includes replacement of a substantial portion of the roof and remediation of soils contaminated by the former factory, began in June 2010. The second phase of renovations, to be done in summer 2011, will include:  • A classroom devoted to sustainability courses • A sustainability resource library • A suite of offices for the Center for Environmental and Sustainable Education • A Green Roof • Solar photovoltaics • Daylight Harvesting • Geothermal Heating System • Outdoor classroom settings with edible landscaping and rainwater harvesting installations • Improved management of storm water runoff

Althouse Hall

 

30,000

 

Science

 

Business and Economics

 

Goodyear Hall

 

80,000

 

Facilities Management Shop

 

Apartments + Art Studio

 

Archeology Lab

 

3500

 

Sabatical Offices

 

Archeology Lab

 

Quarry

 

7000

 

Fraternity House

 

Cafe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


48) Please provide the student enrollment and gross square footage of buildings on campus in the 2000-2001 academic year.

 

Student enrollment (FTE):   2096

Square footage:   1,753,449

 

49) Please provide the student enrollment and gross square footage of buildings on campus for the 2009-2010 academic year.

 

Student enrollment (FTE):   2355

Square footage:   1,844,585

 

OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE


50) Does your school have a formal green building policy specifically pertaining to operations and maintenance?

Yes

 

If yes, please describe policy and provide URL to the full policy, if available:

Facilities Management has implemented a set of Sustainability Standards for all repairs and renovations, which ensures that campus structures and systems are sustainable.  The Standard fulfills a multi-faceted approach that encapsulates energy, construction, recycling, grounds, housekeeping and maintenance.  Detailed information can be found here: http://dickinson.edu/about/offices/facilities-management/content/Sustainable-Operations/


51) Please provide the following information about LEED-EB certified buildings on your campus:

Total number of LEED-EB certified buildings:  0
Combined gross square footage: 
Building names:

 

52) Please provide the following information about buildings that meet LEED-EB certification criteria but are not certified:

Total number of buildings that meet LEED-EB criteria but are not certified: 1
Combined gross square footage:  29133
Building names: Althouse Hall

 

 

WATER MANAGEMENT

 

53) Has your institution reduced its water consumption per weighted campus user, as compared to a 2005 baseline?
Weighted campus users = (1 * number of on-campus residents) + (0.75 * number of non-residential or commuter full-time students, faculty and staff members) + (0.5 * number of non-residential or commuter part-time students, faculty, and staff members) .

Yes

 

If yes, please provide the following information:

2005 baseline year
Weighted campus users:
  2860
Water consumed (gallons):  2461500

Performance year (most recent year for which data are available)
Weighted campus users:
  2985
Water consumed (gallons):   1966200

 

54) Please indicate which of the following water-conservation technologies have been installed in existing buildings on campus. Check all that apply. For each item, please indicate the percentage of possible campus building space in which the technology has been installed.

For example, if dual-flush toilets have been installed in all bathrooms on campus, you would indicate “100” as the percentage of building space in which the technology has been installed.

 

 

 

 

Percentage of building space     

[X]  

 

Building water metering

 

100

[X]  

 

Dual-flush toilets

 

1

[X]  

 

Gray water systems

 

1

[X]  

 

Laundry technology

 

90

[  ]  

 

Leak detection and reduction  

 

[X]  

 

Low-flow faucets

 

75

[X]  

 

Low-flow showerheads

 

95

[  ]  

 

Non-potable water usage

 

[X]  

 

Waterless urinals

 

10

[  ]  

 

Xeriscaping

 

N/A

[X]  

 

Weather-informed irrigation

 

N/A

[X]  

 

Other. Please describe below.  

 

 

Other description: The Dickinson College Farm harvests rainwater from the barn roof, collects the water in a pond, and pumps the water to its fields using a solar powered water pump to supplement rainfed cultivation of crops. The amount of ‘virtual’ water and energy that is saved by growing a portion of our food and reducing our purchases of conventionally grown food has not been estimated, but is significant.

 

55) What stormwater management technologies or strategies are used on your campus?

[X]

 

Living or vegetated roofs  

[  ]

 

Porous pavement

[X]

 

Retention ponds

[  ]

 

Stone swales

[X]

 

Vegetated swales

[X]

 

Other. Please describe: The Alliance for Aquatic Resources Monitoring (ALLARM), a project of the environmental studies department at Dickinson College, has provided technical assistance to volunteer stream monitors in the state of Pennsylvania since 1986. Pennsylvania has more stream miles per land area than any other state in the nation.  ALLARM enhances local action for the protection and restoration of Pennsylvania watersheds by empowering communities with scientific knowledge and tools to implement watershed assessments.  Through the work of student and professional staff, ALLARM offers comprehensive services to enable groups to use critical scientific tools to enhance environmental quality and fully participate in community decision-making.  ALLARM central programs include providing technical support to local watershed groups, K-12 environmental education, aquatic research, LeTort stormwater education project, and public education and outreach. ALLARM also engages in several community-based events that focus on direct stormwater education including an annual festival, stormdrain marking events, and (coming soon!) rain barrel construction workshops.  To date they have marked over 150 storm drains throughout the borough.  Their newest efforts will focus in on monitoring waterways near Marcellus Shale natural gas drilling in the Northeast region of Pennsylvania.

 

ENERGY MANAGEMENT

Information concerning energy management will be drawn from question 26 (Climate Change & Energy) . If you wish to provide any additional information about energy-efficiency technologies installed in campus buildings, please attach it in a supplemental document at the end of the survey.


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STUDENT INVOLVEMENT

 

RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITIES

 

56) Please list sustainability-themed residential communities or housing options at your school.

 A sustainability-themed residential community is created specifically to provide students with a living-and-learning experience focused on sustainability.  Students must have actively selected or applied to live in the residence. Example: Synergy House at Colorado College .

 

For each sustainability-themed residential community, please provide the following information:

 

Name of program     

 

Type of community     

 

Number of students involved     

 

Additional details

Center for Sustainable Living

 

Building

 

14

 

The Center for Sustainable Living, or “Treehouse”, is a student residence building for students who pledge to live more sustainably by limiting their consumption of energy, water and other resources, to live communally by sharing responsibilities for management of the house, and to promote sustainability on campus and in the community. The residents, or “tree kids”, are among the most active sustainability leaders at Dickinson, organizing and participating in a variety of events, hosting “soup and bread” nights to discuss sustainability issues, working with facilities staff to design and install a 4.4 kW solar photovoltaic array on the roof of the Treehouse, and planting a native meadow and garden next to the house. The Treehouse was established in 1990 and moved into its current location in 2007, a renovated structure that is a showcase of sustainability design. The new home for the Treehouse received LEED Gold certification for its passive solar design, natural lighting, grey-water system, waterless urinals, energy and water use monitoring system, and other ‘green’ features. See http://www.dickinson.edu/news-and-events/news/2008-09/Treehouse-Captures-Gold-Rating-for-Environmental-Design/.

Residential Learning Community: A Food Odyssey

 

bBuilding

 

75

 

For the third consecutive year, Dickinson College will have a sustainability themed Residential Learning Community for first year students. Seventy-five students, fifteen in each of six First-Year Seminars that will explore questions about food and food systems from a variety of perspectives, will live together in a residence hall as members of the Food Odyssey Residential Learning Community. Members of the learning community will participate in activities that extend learning beyond the classroom and into the residence hall and community. Activities include field trips, service learning projects, dinner and film discussions with faculty members, attendance of public lectures on food and sustainability (invited speakers include Eric Schlosser, Michael Abelman, Marion Nestle, and Anna Lappe), and small group interactions with the guest speakers. Members of the sustainability learning communities of past years have organized themselves to take action to reduce the ecological footprint of their residence hall by setting up clothes-drying racks in their dorm, establishing a composting program for their building, planting a garden and other measures. The Learning Community will be assigned an upper-level student coordinator who will live in the residence hall and work with the students and faculty to plan and coordinator activities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION


57) Does a portion of your new student orientation specifically cover sustainability?

Yes

 

If yes, please check and describe all ways in which sustainability is incorporated into new student orientation:

[  ]  

 

Skits, speakers, or presentations that take place in large venues that most or all first-year students attend. Topics must include at least one of the following: promoting the Office of Sustainability, student campus sustainability groups, or sustainability as an important campus issue.

[X]  

 

Incorporating sustainability information into presentations made by RAs to individual hallways.

[X]  

 

Active engagement of students in activities that raise awareness about sustainability, highlight how sustainability occurs on campus, or in which students take part in a productive activity, such as volunteer work or projects (e.g., working in the on-campus garden).

[X]  

 

Making orientation more sustainable through efforts such as a zero-waste meal or carbon offsets.

[X]  

 

Other. Please describe:

 A sustainability discussion is built into the Orientation Schedule. Each  dorm will have designated "eco-reps" who will be tasked with educating the residents about how to act in accordance with the principles of sustainability. They will maintain a relationship with the residents of a dorm for the entirety of the year and to help reinforce good practices among the residence halls. First-year students will be offered four options to engage in sustainability education : a bio-diesel lab at our in house bio-diesel production facility. A lesson on Herbal Medicine Gardening, a lab on geographic information systems (GIS) and a Bike Tour of Carlisle. The common film (film that every incoming student is required to view) for this year is "Food, Inc." an expose on the industrial food system in the United States and the associated environmental and public health issues it is believed to cause. The students will discuss their thoughts on the film during orientation. Dickinson has also achieved a significant reduction in paper and printing materials by hosting all but a very few of its orientation and first year preparation forms online.

 

INTERNSHIPS/OUTREACH OPPORTUNITIES


58) Does your school offer on-campus, office-based sustainability internships or jobs for students during the academic year?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide the number of students and average number of hours worked weekly per student below.

 

 

 

Number of students:     

 

Average hours worked weekly per student:    

Paid positions

 

Approximately 50

 

Between 5 - 20 hours

Unpaid positions

 

 


59) Does your school have residence hall Eco-Reps or a similar program to promote behavioral change on campus?

 

If yes, please provide the URL to the program's website. If not, select “no.”

n/a

 

Please provide the following details about the number of students involved in program, their average working hours, and any compensation that they receive.

 

 

 

Number of students:     

 

Average hours worked weekly per student:

Paid positions.

 

1

 

8 hours

Positions that award academic credit.  

 

0

 

n/a

Uncompensated positions.

 

19

 

2-3 hours per week

 

SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGES AND COMPETITIONS

 

60) Does your school organize any sustainability challenges/competitions for your campus and/or with other colleges?

Yes, three or more competitions.

 

For each competition or challenge that is run on campus, please provide the details requested. You may provide detailed information for up to three competitions.

 

First Competition:

 

Competition Overview

 

Competition Name: RecycleMania

Year Initiated: 2004

Website:

 

Frequency that competition is run:   Once annually

 

Groups involved in coordinating the competition:

[X]

 

Students

[X]

 

Faculty

[X]

 

Staff

[X]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, please describe.  

 

Participants in the competition:

[X]

 

Students

[  ]

 

Faculty

[X]

 

Staff

[  ]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, please describe:  

 

Incentives for participation:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[X]  

 

Cash

 

Class that recycles the most wins $100

[X]  

 

Non-monetary prizes  

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

Goals of competition:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Energy conservation  

 

[X]  

 

Waste reduction

 

Non-Monetary Prizes: Coordinated events by the Office of Sustainbility throughout the RecycleMania contest provide different incentives depending on the week.   • Monday Mugs in the Morning: Free coffee/hot chocolate if you have a reusable mug • Free cookie if community member uses a reusable grab-n-go bag • Bring in 10 plastic bags and get a chico bag

[  ]

 

Water conservation  

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

Percent of energy and/or resource use reduction resulting from the competition:   The Green Devil Challenge records our resource use reduction.  Dickinson College's eco-reps are currently looking into a weighted scale in order to maintain better statistical analysis of our compost and recycling tonnage throughout the year.

Lasting effects of competition:   This competition has spawned several annual environmental awareness events like Trash on the Plaza, whereby students and administrators sort through trash bags to find recyclable and compostable material and re-direct the trash to the right recyclable stream.    The recycling and composting rate had improved significantly, too: 22 percent of the HUB’s trash could have been recycled or composted, down from 48 percent when the event began in 2006.

Additional Information:  

 

Second Competition:

 

Competition Overview

 

Competition Name: Green Devil Challenge

Year Initiated: 2006

Website:

 

Frequency that competition is run:  Once annually

 

Groups involved in coordinating the competition:

[X]

 

Students

 

[  ]

 

Faculty

 

[  ]

 

Staff

 

[  ]

 

Administrators

 

[  ]

 

Other, please describe.  

 

 

Participants in the competition:

[X]

 

Students

[  ]

 

Faculty

[X]

 

Staff

[  ]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, describe:  

 

Incentives for participation:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Cash

 

[X]  

 

Non-monetary prizes  

 

Non-monetary prizes:  Individual challenges won a corresponding prize related to the type of contest.  These are examples of some of the prizes.  • Dickinson sweatshirt/scarf for Thermostat challenge • Smart power strip for computer use/phantom draw competition • Walking and biking to class wins a gift certificate to local bike store

[X]  

 

Other

 

CFL Swap

 

Goals of competition:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[X]  

 

Energy conservation

 

An eight-week program, the Challenge enables participants to reduce energy and water consumption by helping them build sustainable habits into their daily routines. Each week, the Office of Sustainability e-mails to participants practical information about how to conserve resources. Students who respond to the e-mails have an opportunity to win a prize.

[  ]  

 

Waste reduction

 

[X]  

 

Water conservation  

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 


Percent of energy and/or resource use reduction resulting from the competition:   15-20% overall energy consumption over the course of the competition.

Lasting effects of competition:   The focus on individual habits, via this challenge and a plethora of sustainable activities on camps, is creating systemic awareness throughout campus.  Ultimately, tracking reduction is our goal, but the Green Devil Challenge is a foundational campaign that will permit this tracking and encourage life-time sustainable habits for students.

Additional Information:  

 

Third Competition:

 

Competition Overview

 

Competition Name: Sustainability Sculpture Contest

Year Initiated: 2006

Website:

 

Frequency that competition is run: Once annually

 

Groups involved in coordinating the competition:

[X]

 

Students

[  ]

 

Faculty

[  ]

 

Staff

[  ]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, please describe.

   

 

Participants in the competition:

[X]

 

Students

[  ]

 

Faculty

[  ]

 

Staff

[  ]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, describe:

 

Incentives for participation:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[X]  

 

Cash

 

[  ]  

 

Non-monetary prizes

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

Goals of competition:

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Energy conservation  

 

[X]  

 

Waste reduction

 

Using reclaimed material for repurposed art.

[  ]  

 

Water conservation

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 


Percent of energy and/or resource use reduction resulting from the competition:  N/A

Lasting effects of competition:  A sculpture contest on the quad draws attention to the multi-faceted ways in which we can reduce, reuse, and recycle our waste.  Additionally, this contest has provided an outlet for creative students to involve themselves in sustainable practices.

Additional Information:  

 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS


61) Does your school have active student-run organizations devoted to sustainability efforts on campus?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide names of organizations, a brief description of each, and URLs for the organizations’ websites, if available:

Name

 

Description

 

URL

Students Interested in Sustainable Agriculture (SISA)

 

This student-run group works closely with Jenn Halpin, the College's  Organic Farm manager, and others to learn about sustainable agriculture, organic farming practices, local foods, and more. The group aims to promote knowledge and awareness of locally-grown, organic produce through education, programming, practical learning and participation in farm stand projects. SISA was established in 1999

 

http://www2.dickinson.edu/storg/sisa/student_farmer.html

 

 

 

 

 

Dickinson S.A.V.E.S (Society Advocating Environmental Sustainability)

 

Dickinson S.A.V.E.S has been around in one form or another since 1991 when it was created as the Commission on the Environment (COTE), which was a presidentially-appointed committee. It was renamed SAVES in 2006 and subsequently opened to the entire campus community. SAVES is a coalition of staff, faculty, administration, and students that focuses on developing and implementing sustainability initiatives, including Adopt-A-Highway (McClure’s Gap Road), setting energy management policies, reducing paper consumption, and more. There is also a student –chaired subcommittee of SAVES that is tasked with addressing issues of food sustainability with regard to the College’s Dining Services and Campus Operations.

 

http://www.dickinson.edu/about/sustainability/dickinson-saves/content/About-SAVES/

 

 

 

 

 

Socially Responsible Investment Discussion Group

 

The Socially Responsible Investing (SRI) Discussion Group was convened by President William Durden in August 2007. Inspiration for the group‘s establishment came from a proposal submitted the previous winter by students regarding the issue of divestment from companies in Darfur, Sudan. These students were enrolled in a First-Year Seminar titled ―War Crimes, Tribunals, and Truth Commissions‖ in which they learned about genocide and human rights abuses. After questioning what could be done at the college level to impact current abuses – primarily the crisis situation in Darfur – these students began to examine Dickinson College‘s investment funds to determine whether any action should or could be taken against firms in which the College‘s endowment was invested..Because of the nature of the College’s endowment (all mutual funds), our options to intervene as shareholders is limited. This, however, has not stopped the SRIDG from being active. Instead of exploring stock divestment from controversial firms, the Discussion Group has adopted a policy of shareholder engagement. We feel that this is a more proactive approach, because if we pursue divestment, ultimately someone else will purchase that share. Shareholder engagement, rather, allows a productive dialogue between the shareholder and the corporation. It also provides an educational opportunity for the students involved. The SRI Discussion Group held direct talks with Schulmberger, a French oil field services company that has conducted controversial business in the Darfur region of Sudan. Discussion group members had the opportunity to ask questions about Schlumberger’s involvement in Sudan and were able to learn more about community programs being put in place by the company. These programs include the drilling of community wells for potable water, providing for the medical needs of internally displaced persons, and building schools equipped with science laboratories.

 

http://www.dickinson.edu/about/offices/financial-operations/content/investments/Note-on-SRI/

 

 

 

 

 

EarthNow!

 

EarthNow! is an all-student organization that advocates environmental sustainability in various ways on campus, local, state, and national issues. They are very active in the campus community. They organize EarthFest, Which is an all day event that EarthNow organizes every year to celebration of Earth Day. The event invites local community and the entire campus to participate throughout the day. Local vendors, green organizations, and student groups set up tables around the auditorium with different displays. We had a student band perform in the morning and 2 bluegrass bands perform in the afternoon. Two speakers also gave presentations related to green jobs. This is just one of many things that EarthNow does. For more information see the student survey completed by Taylor Wilmot '13

 

http://www2.dickinson.edu/storg/earthnow/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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TRANSPORTATION

 

CAMPUS MOTOR FLEET

 

62) How many vehicles are in your institution's fleet?
The fleet includes all vehicles owned by the campus such as cars, trucks, and carts. It does not include lawnmowers or other off-road vehicles.

106

 

63) Please indicate which of the following alternative-fuel vehicles are included in your fleet. Check all that apply. Please list the number of vehicles for each class.

 

 

 

 

Number of vehicles

[X]  

 

100 percent electric

 

1

[  ]  

 

Diesel-electric hybrid

 

[  ]  

 

Fueled with B20 or higher biofuel for more than 6 months of the year

 

[X]  

 

Fueled with E85 or higher ethanol for more than 6 months of the year    

 

5

[X]  

 

Gasoline-electric hybrid

 

8

[  ]  

 

Hydrogen fueled

 

[  ]  

 

Plug-in hybrid

 

[  ]  

 

Other. Please describe:

 

 


COMMUTE MODAL SPLIT

64) What portion of the student body commutes via transportation methods other than single-occupancy vehicles (e.g., bicycle, walking, public transportation, carpool/vanpool)?

95%

 

If data are available, please provide the percentage of students who commute by each of the following means.

 

 

 

Percentage

Bicycle

 

5%

Carpool/vanpool

 

Public transit

 

Single-occupancy vehicle    

 

5%

Walking

 

90%

 

65) What percentage of employees commute via transportation methods other than single-occupancy vehicles (e.g., bicycle, walking, public transportation, carpool)?

14%

 

If data are available, please provide the percentage of employees who commute by each of the following means.

 

 

 

Percentage

Bicycle

 

1%

Carpool/vanpool

 

5%

Public transit

 

0%

Single-occupancy vehicle    

 

86%

Walking

 

13%

 

LOCAL TRANSPORTATION ALTERNATIVES

 

66) Does your school offer incentives for carpooling to faculty, staff and/or students? Check all that apply, and describe below.

[X] No

[  ] Yes, to faculty and staff

[  ] Yes, to students

 

Description:  Alternative transportation options and incentives are in the planning stages.  Data has been collected, and the CESE office will convene for a strategic planning session before the academic year begins.


Please check and describe carpooling incentives provided for faculty/staff . Check all that apply.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[  ]  

 

Carpool matching

 

[  ]  

 

Financial remuneration  

 

[  ]  

 

Preferential parking

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 


Please check and describe carpooling incentives provided for students . Check all that apply.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[  ]  

 

Carpool matching

 

[  ]  

 

Financial remuneration  

 

[  ]  

 

Preferential parking

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

67) Does your school offer subsidies for the use of public transportation?

 

No

 

 If not applicable, please explain:  Public transportation is not necessary in Carlisle. Off-campus transporation is provided by the College or students can use ZipCar .  Most students and many employees walk.  Carlisle is a pedestrian friendly town.

 

 

 

Eligible community members:

 

Size of the discount (as a percent of full price)

[  ]  

 

Faculty

 

[  ]  

 

Staff

 

[  ]  

 

Students   

 


[   ]  Check here if subsidy takes the form of pre-tax payroll deduction. Please describe below:

 

68) Does your school provide free transportation around campus?

 

 

 If not applicable, please explain:  The campus is compact and it is possible to walk the breadth of campus in 20 minutes.  Bikes are available for students to use, free of charge.

 

69) Does your school operate a free transportation shuttle to local off-campus destinations?

 

Yes – The College offers a weekly shuttle to nearby Harrisburg. This allows students to visit all of Harrisburg’s attractions, including the Whitaker Center for Science and the Arts, the Restaurant district, the Capital City Mall, and other places of interest. Most other local off-campus places of interest are within walking or biking distance of the College’s campus. The vast majority of students purchasing needs can be met without utilizing carbon-based transportation.

 

  

 

BICYCLE PROGRAM

 

70) Does your school offer a bicycle sharing/rental program?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.


Year created:   2006
Number of bikes available:   15
Usage fee per hour:     $0
Usage fee per day:    $0

 

Annual membership fee for students:  $0

Annual membership fee for faculty, staff, and administrators:   $0

Other annual membership fee:  $0

 

Description: The College encourages the use of bicycles by providing bike racks throughout campus by providing bikes free of charge. During the past year, Facilities Management (FM) installed a significant number of new, sizable bike racks around campus. FM encourages employees to bike to work when possible, and they maintain a fleet of bikes for employee usage. FM also maintains two scooters (which get about 100mpg) to answer service calls on campus where large equipment is not required.

 

71) Does your school offer bicycle repair services?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below:


Year created:   2006
Service fee:   No
Description:   Classes about how to perform maintenance are offered

 

CAR SHARING PROGRAM

 

72) Does your school partner with a car-sharing program?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

Year created:   2009
Total number of vehicles:  2
Number of hybrid vehicles:    2
Usage fee per hour:  
Usage fee per day:  


Annual membership fee for students:  $35

Annual membership fee for faculty, staff, and administrators:  $35

Other annual membership fee: 

 

Description: The College has partnered with ZipCar to provide car sharing services, which will be up and running for the beginning of the 2009-2010 school year. We expect to see great success and hope that with publicity and education, students will begin to carpool in the ZipCars rather than use individual transportation.  We also hope that the availability of these cars will reduce the number of cars brought to campus by students.

 

PLANNING

 

73) Does your school have policies that support a pedestrian-friendly or bike-friendly campus (e.g., in the school's master plan, a policy prohibiting vehicles from the center of campus)?

The college helped fund a study on local traffic patterns, which led to the Borough of Carlisle receiving a $2.8 million dollar grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation to create a road diet that will reduce the number of lanes along the main drag of Carlisle.  Five-foot wide bicycle lanes will be added to each side of High Street, and motorists will be limited to one lane in each direction and use a center lane for turns.  The plan calls for the use of decorative stamped asphalt on the center lane through the Dickinson campus.

 

74) Do you offer the option of a condensed work week or telecommuting to at least ten percent of full-time employees? For each option, please indicate who is eligible.

 

 

 

 

Employees eligible

 

Description:

[X]  

 

Telecommuting

 

All

 

The College does not offer employees a formal option to telecommute, but employees are encouraged to work from home in special circumstances. The 'Dickinson Gateway' portal makes administrative systems availible from a distance.

[  ]  

 

Condensed work week  

 

 

 

Additional comments: An important part of Dickinson's unique approach to the liberal arts curriculum is faculty accessibility. Additionally, many employees live close to campus, so even if they are driving, it is a short distance.


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STATISTICS

 

75) Campus setting:        

Urban

 

76) Total number of buildings on campus:

147

 

77) Combined gross square footage of all buildings on campus: 

1,844,585

 

78) Full-time enrollment (undergraduate + graduate, headcount at start of academic year): 

2,355

 

79) Part-time enrollment (undergraduate + graduate, headcount at start of academic year): 

8

 

80) Percent of full-time students that live on campus: 

94%

 

 

OTHER AREAS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGAGEMENT

Question 81 is for informational purposes only; responses will NOT be included in the Report Card evaluation process.

 

81) Please check all items that apply to your institution:

 

 

 

 

 

Description (optional)

[X]    

 

Campus garden or farm

 

Both. The College's organic farm provides substantial amounts of produce to the College and local community

 

 

 

 

 

[  ]    

 

Disposable water bottle ban

 

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Environmental science/studies major (undergraduate-level)

 

Environmental Studies (B.A) or Environmental Science (B.S.)

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Environmental science/studies minor or concentration (undergraduate-level)   

 

 

 

 

 

 

[  ]    

 

Graduate-level environmental studies program (graduate-level)

 

 

 

 

 

 

[  ]    

 

Graduate-level sustainability studies program

 

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Outdoors club

 

 

 

 

 

 

[X]     

 

Participation in Recyclemania

 

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Single-stream recycling

 

 

 

 

 

 

[  ]    

 

Student trustee position

 

 

 

 

 

 

[  ]    

 

Sustainability major, minor or concentration (undergraduate-level)   

 

 


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