We're on Twitter and Facebook    |   Search    |    Login   or   Register

Report Card 2011

2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011

Luther College

Campus Survey

<< Back to Report Card

 

 

With the publication of the College Sustainability Report Card 2011, more than 1,100 school survey responses from over 300 institutions are now available online. In total, these surveys offer more than 10,000 pages of data collected from colleges and universities during the summer of 2010 . To access surveys from other schools, go to the  surveys section  of the website. To see grades, or to access additional surveys submitted by this school, please click the "Back to Report Card" link at the beginning or end of the survey.

 

School name: Luther College

Date submitted: September 22, 2010

 

ADMINISTRATION

 

SUSTAINABILITY POLICIES

 

1)  Does your school have its own formal sustainability policy and/or sustainability plan? Check all that apply.

[X]  No

[  ]  Yes, a sustainability policy. Please describe and provide the URL below.

[  ]  Yes, a sustainability plan. Please describe and provide the URL below.

 

Description:

 

2)  Has the president of your institution signed any commitments related to environmental stewardship and/or greenhouse gas reductions? Check all that apply.

[  ]  None

[X]  American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC)

[  ]  Talloires Declaration
[  ]  Other. Please describe:


3)  Is there a sustainability component in your institution's master plan and/or strategic plan? Check all that apply.
[  ]  No
[  ]  Yes, in the master plan. Please describe and provide the URL below.

[X]  Yes, in the strategic plan. Please describe and provide the URL below.

 

Description: Connecting Sustainability, Stewardship, and Global Citizenship is one of three strategic imperatives adopted by Luther College in honor of our upcoming sesquicentennial.  Within the plan we are called to: 1) Create Awareness, 2) Adopt Sustainable Practices and 3) Care for Place. Awareness will be created through the development of a Center for Sustainable Communities which will be a catalyst for change locally and regionally.  We will also create awareness by making sustainability a part of every student's learning experience and nurturing connection to place. Luther will adopt sustainable practices by modeling stewardship and sustainability in all college operations to reduce our environmental impact and mitigate operational costs. We will also work to reduce our carbon footprint by 50 percent and develop a plan to achieve carbon neutrality. We will care for place by designing and implementing a campus land-use plan that affirms land stewardship, sustainability, and landscape designer Jens Jensen’s original vision for the Luther campus in 1911. Additionally, we will continue sustainable and strategic enhancements of the plant and facilities with a focus on student learning, energy payback, campus needs, and economic return.Sustainability Portion of the Strategic Plan:http://reason.luther.edu/sustainability/commitments/strategicplan/Full Version of the Strategic Planhttp://www.luther.edu/about/strategic/

 

ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEES

 

4)  Does your school have any administrative councils, committees or task forces that advise on and/or implement sustainability policies and programs?

You may provide detailed information for up to three committees. If you have one advisory committee that is broken down into subcommittees, please indicate that you have one committee and answer the questions on the following page for the entire committee (the sum of data for all subcommittees).

Yes

 

Please provide the number of committees: One committee

 

Committee I

 

5)  Please provide the name of the committee and note the number of meetings held since August 2009.

 

Committee name: Campus Sustainability Council

Number of meetings: 6

 

6)  Please provide the number of stakeholder representatives on the committee.

When providing the data on each stakeholder group, you should provide the total number across all subcommittees (you do not need to numerate individual tallies for subcommittees).

 

 

 

Number of representatives

Administrators

 

3

Faculty

 

5

Staff

 

4

Students

 

3

Other. Please describe.   

 

Decorah Community Member- 1

 

7)  Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents.

 

 

 

Name       

 

Position

Chair 1   

 

Dr. Craig Mosher  

 

Faculty

Chair 2

 

   

 

Chair 3

 

   

 

 

8)  To whom does the committee report?
[X]  President/Chancellor
[  ]  Vice President/Vice Chancellor
[  ] Other:

 

9)  Please indicate the key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2009. For each issue addressed, please indicate and describe progress made.
“Moderate” progress indicates that issues were discussed thoroughly and projects are in the early stages of planning. “Significant” progress indicates that new policies or programs were implemented, or are in the final stages of planning and approval.

 

 

 

Addressed       

 

Progress     

 

Description

Academics

Examples: minor, major and concentration programs, curricular additions, research projects

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Luther is the lead institution for the ACM FaCE Project, which aims to integrate sustainability into the undergraduate curriculum. The project is funded by ACM (Associated Colleges of the Midwest) and work is being carried out in collaboration with Carlton College, Macalester College and St. Olaf College. The aim of the project is to change the sustainability dynamic on our college campuses by gathering carefully selected faculty representatives of ACM schools to work together in an intentional and structured way over a full year.  The goal of this cross-disciplinary and cross-college collaboration is to develop, assess, and then disseminate well thought-out pedagogical strategies and practical, meaningful, usable activities for introductory courses across the disciplines at our institutions and beyond.  A conscious attention to learning outcomes further enhances the promise of this collaborative work among the colleges of the ACM.  Participants have been selected and the opening workshop took place this Summer at Luther College.  Participants were together for two full days and will gather again for a closing event next Summer.  Luther also recently conducted a Sustainability in the Curriculum Survey and is pleased to discover that sustainability is present in more courses than originally anticipated. Environmental Philosophy class projects continue to enrich the culture of sustainability on campus.  This year projects coming out of this class led to the creation of a Sustainable Living House, Edible Landscaping Garden and Downtown Shopping Shuttle.

Administration

Examples: procurement policies, institution-wide sustainability policy, sustainability-related staff positions

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

College administrators were able to find funding to extend the contract of the Assistant Sustainability Coordinator, which will allow us to take on more programs and expand upon what we're currently doing in the Sustainability Department.

Climate

Examples: draft climate action plan, greenhouse gas emissions inventory

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

We submitted our climate action plan on November 15th, 2009.  Language can be found here: http://luther.edu/sustainability/commitments/climateactionplan/.  Luther also continues to collect and compare emissions data with peer institutions.

 

Endowment

Examples: proxy voting guidelines, investment advisory committees

 

[X]

 

Moderate

 

A group in the Environmental Philosophy class took an interest in investigating Luther's endowment and talking to the Responsible Endowments Coalition to develop ideas for how to work towards a more sustainable endowment at Luther.  This Fall three students attended the Board Investment Committee meeting where they learned about how the endowment works and became privy to the many tough decisions that need to be made in regards to the college's endowment.  Students got a private audience with the VP for Finance and Administration after they wrote up a letter with their endowment related recommendations.  Conversations are still happening, but there has been a lot of rich dialogue in regards to the endowment and there seems to be receptiveness to exploring new ideas. Luther is also in the middle of fundraising for a $5,000,000 endowment, which will fund our Center for Sustainable Communities.  This endowment will support the Campus Sustainability Coordinator position, a Center Director, Student Sustainability Internships and Center Programs and Initiatives, including; Community Energy Systems, Sustainable Food Systems, Environmental/Education Outreach and Sustainable Business and Entrepreneurship.

Energy

Examples: conservation/behavioral change programs, retrofits and efficiency improvements

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

This Fall Luther worked with consultants to develop an Energy Conservation Program.  Work was funded by a grant from the Rocky Mountain Institute.  The final product of our work with the consultants is a booklet, which outlines past energy trends and lays out goals for the next five years and means for achieving those goals.  We plan to reduce energy use by 3% per year through efficiency improvements and 2% per year through behavior change. Energy efficiency improvements have begun and new water, condensate and electric meters are being installed. We are currently working with an energy kiosk vendor to develop a web-based product that we can use to relay energy information to the campus community. The Energy Conservation Program was officially approved and adopted by the Sustainability Council and President's Cabinet in Spring 2010. Additionally, we are currently fundraising $2,000,000 to put into an endowment that will support our investment in renewable energy on campus. This Spring a land lease was signed for the site on which Luther will place a wind turbine in the coming year.  The turbine will generate one-third of the college’s energy.

Food

Examples: policies to increase purchase of local/sustainably produced foods, implementing campus gardens

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Luther continues to work towards our goal of procuring 35% local food.  Nearly 100% of all beef and pork served on campus is Organic Grass Fed meet coming from a farm about 30 miles away.  This year our Production Manager was able to convince our milk supplier to go hormone-free. By virtue of going trayless nearly 2 years ago we are running the dishwashers 2 hours less per day, which saves 700 gallons of water daily, energy and soap. Luther continues to maintain vegetable gardens.  This year we added one garden on central campus after a proposal from the Environmental Philosophy class was approved.  That space serves as our Edible Landscaping Garden and not only provides delicious food for the cafeteria, but also provides a way for campus community members and visitors to engage with vegetable production in a fun way. We have two heirloom vegetable gardens in production, which will be used as part of diversity training in the Fall.  Additionally, we maintain a production garden where mixed greens, spinach, head lettuce, peppers, eggplant, basil, etc is grown. Plots in the Faculty/Staff Community Garden were fully subscribed this year and are looking beautiful.  One plot was planted with potatoes donated by the cafeteria.  The entire harvest will be donated to the local Food Pantry.

Green Building

Examples: design or construction policy

 

[  ]

 

 

Student Involvement

Examples:  speaker series, peer-to-peer residential sustainability education programs, student guide to sustainable living on campus

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Students organized a sustainability film series, started the vermicomposting initiative, conducted low-flow showerhead tests to determine which model was preferred by their peers (the lowest flow model won), worked to improve the recycling program, organized the campus energy competition, developed the proposal for the sustainable living house and developed the proposal for the edible landscaping project. Students also presented about vermicomposting at the UMACS conference, attended the Real Foods Conference and Iowa College and University Working Group on Sustainability.

Transportation

Examples: incentives for use of environmentally-preferable commuting options, campus fleet improvements, connecting students with public transit     

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

This year students worked on a proposal for a downtown shuttle.  Surveys were conducted to determine days and times that work best for students.  In the Fall we will be starting the shuttle service, which will run 2 times a month and take students to Walmart and downtown to do their shopping.  Furthermore, to encourage students to keep their cars at home, we have expanded our break shuttle service and will now be serving Chicago (in addition to Rochester/Minneapolis).  A computer science professor and student created an online ride-share site that replaced our antiquated ride board and provides students with an easy way of coordinating rides home for breaks. This year we offered safe, dry winter bike storage for all students who brought bikes to campus and we continue to offer bikes through our bike share program to which over 25% of the campus population has a membership. We are also in the process of exploring the feasibility of having a car-share program come to campus.  We also purchased 2 more hybrids, bringing our hybrid fleet up to 10.

Waste Reduction

Examples: recycling, composting, reducing consumption

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

This year we began managing the recycling program via Google sites, which allows us to manage pick-ups and special requests in a stream-lined way.  Shift reports are completed by the crew after each shift and have been a helpful way for us to keep track of any issues that may arise and address them appropriately.  Contrary to previous years, we have composted for the entirety of the year.  Indoor recycling receptacles were added to two first year halls that previously didn’t have indoor recycling.  One member of the recycling team wrote a proposal to student senate for funding to build a nice-looking cabinetry-style recycling unit for one of the first year halls and his request was granted. This year we began our vermicomposting program in the residence halls, which has provided a way for students to properly dispose of fruit and vegetable refuse that was previously ending up in the trash.  We have begun a concerted effort to collect redeemable items from across campus.  The proceeds from the collection go towards the creation of a LEED-certified Habitat for Humanity House.  We contracted with to make Luther a redemption site, which enables us to get $.06/item. An Office reuse store was also created this year as a way for offices to share items that they may not need anymore with other offices that could use them.  An iconic red barn on campus has been transformed from a messy storage area to the space which houses the college’s Reuse Store.  Historically Luther has held an auction once a year where community members can come and pick up items the college is getting rid of for reasonable prices.  However, the auction was a lot of work for facilities so have transitioned towards having one sale a month in the barn.  One person's trash is another person's treasure. This year Luther started to use GoPrint, a system which limits the amount that system users can print. As GoPrint was put into place on January 5th, 2009, we are able to compare unmetered printing usage vs metered printing during the Spring semester.  Spring '09 : 1,866,667 (126 printers)  Spring '10 : 1,198,636 (151 printers)  Spring '09 Average per Printer : 14,814 pages  Spring '10 Average per Printer : 7,937 pages  Between 2009 and 2010, we saw a drop of over 668,000 printed pages or a drop of 35.8%.  This is roughly three pallets of paper (40 boxes per pallet, 1 box = 5,000 sheets).

 

Water

Examples: water conservation, reducing campus pollution, bottled water campaigns

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

For the first time ever, this year we metered water as part of our energy competition.  Meters were read once a week and students were given ideas for ways to conserve water.  Perhaps more significant, this spring we conducted low flow showerhead trials of various low flow showerheads. This project began when members of the Brandt Hall Council Sustainability Committee took it upon themselves to measure the flow coming out of the showerheads and determined it to be too high.  The Sustainability Department put the students in touch with one of the college plumbers who promptly ordered samples of 5 low flow models.  Those 5 were tested on one floor in a first year hall.  From there, we chose the top 3 showerheads and tested them in 25 locations around campus.  Students got to vote for their favorite and we were pleased when they chose the lowest flow model.  The goal is to switch out all campus showerheads with the selected low flow model.  Making this switch could save millions of gallons of water/year, not to mention the energy it takes to heat all excess water.  A video about the initiative can be found here: http://luther.edu/sustainability/initiatives/energy/

Other

 

[  ]

 

 

 

Committee II

 

5b)  Please provide the name of the committee and note the number of meetings held since August 2009.

 

Committee name:

Number of meetings:

 

6b)  Please provide the number of stakeholder representatives on the committee.

When providing the data on each stakeholder group, you should provide the total number across all subcommittees (you do not need to numerate individual tallies for subcommittees).

 

 

 

Number of representatives

Administrators

 

Faculty

 

Staff

 

Students

 

Other. Please describe.     

 

 

7b)  Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents.

 

 

 

Name      

 

Position

Chair 1    

 

 

Chair 2

 

 

Chair 3

 

 

 

8b)  To whom does the committee report?
[  ]  President/Chancellor
[  ]  Vice President/Vice Chancellor
[  ]  Other:  

 

9b)  Please indicate the key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2009. For each issue addressed, please indicate and describe progress made.
“Moderate” progress indicates that issues were discussed thoroughly and projects are in the early stages of planning. “Significant” progress indicates that new policies or programs were implemented, or are in the final stages of planning and approval.

 

 

 

Addressed  

 

Progress 

 

Description

Academics

Examples: minor, major and concentration programs, curricular additions, research projects

 

[  ]

 

 

 

Administration

Examples: procurement policies, institution-wide sustainability policy, sustainability-related staff positions

 

[  ]

 

 

Climate

Examples: draft climate action plan, greenhouse gas emissions inventory

 

[  ]

 

 

Endowment

Examples: proxy voting guidelines, investment advisory committees

 

[  ]

 

 

Energy

Examples: conservation/behavioral change programs, retrofits and efficiency improvements

 

[  ]

 

 

Food

Examples: policies to increase purchase of local/sustainably produced foods, implementing campus gardens

 

[  ]

 

 

Green Building

Examples: design or construction policy

 

[  ]

 

 

Student Involvement

Examples:  speaker series, peer-to-peer residential sustainability education programs, student guide to sustainable living on campus

 

[  ]

 

 

Transportation

Examples: incentives for use of environmentally-preferable commuting options, campus fleet improvements, connecting students with public transit     

 

[  ]

 

 

Waste Reduction

Examples: recycling, composting, reducing consumption

 

[  ]

 

 

Water

Examples: water conservation, reducing campus pollution, bottled water campaigns

 

[  ]

 

 

Other

 

[  ]

 

 

 

Committee III

 

5c)  Please provide the name of the committee and note the number of meetings held since August 2009.

 

Committee name:

Number of meetings:

 

6c)  Please provide the number of stakeholder representatives on the committee.

When providing the data on each stakeholder group, you should provide the total number across all subcommittees (you do not need to numerate individual tallies for subcommittees).

 

 

 

Number of representatives

Administrators

 

Faculty

 

Staff

 

Students

 

Other. Please describe.     

 

 

7c)  Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents.

 

 

 

Name      

 

Position

Chair 1    

 

 

Chair 2

 

 

Chair 3

 

 

 

8c)  To whom does the committee report?
[  ]  President/Chancellor
[  ]  Vice President/Vice Chancellor
[  ]  Other: 

 

9c)  Please indicate the key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2009. For each issue addressed, please indicate and describe progress made.
“Moderate” progress indicates that issues were discussed thoroughly and projects are in the early stages of planning. “Significant” progress indicates that new policies or programs were implemented, or are in the final stages of planning and approval.

 

 

 

Addressed  

 

Progress  

 

Description

Academics

Examples: minor, major and concentration programs, curricular additions, research projects

 

[  ]

 

 

Administration

Examples: procurement policies, institution-wide sustainability policy, sustainability-related staff positions

 

[  ]

 

 

Climate

Examples: draft climate action plan, greenhouse gas emissions inventory

 

[  ]

 

 

Endowment

Examples: proxy voting guidelines, investment advisory committees

 

[  ]

 

 

Energy

Examples: conservation/behavioral change programs, retrofits and efficiency improvements

 

[  ]

 

 

Food

Examples: policies to increase purchase of local/sustainably produced foods, implementing campus gardens      

 

[  ]

 

 

Green Building

Examples: design or construction policy

 

[  ]

 

 

Student Involvement

Examples:  speaker series, peer-to-peer residential sustainability education programs, student guide to sustainable living on campus

 

[  ]

 

 

Transportation

Examples: incentives for use of environmentally-preferable commuting options, campus fleet improvements, connecting students with public transit      

 

[  ]

 

 

Waste Reduction

Examples: recycling, composting, reducing consumption

 

[  ]

 

 

Water

Examples: water conservation, reducing campus pollution, bottled water campaigns

 

[  ]

 

 

Other

 

[  ]

 

 

 

 

OFFICE OR DEPARTMENT                                  


10) Does your school have an office or department exclusively dedicated to furthering sustainability on campus? Please note: this does not include academic programs focused on sustainability.
Please provide the number of staff in the office in terms of full-time equivalent (FTE). FTE for a full-time staff member would be 1, FTE for a half-time staff member would be 0.5.

Yes

 

Please provide details below.

 

Office name: Sustainability Department

Year created: 2007

Description: The Sustainabilty Department works on many initiatives including recycling, composting, waste reduction, first year immersion programs, backyard wilderness persuits, college gardens, student projects, etc.

Number of staff in office (in FTE): 2

 

SUSTAINABILITY STAFF

Please provide your answers to questions 11-12 in terms of full-time equivalent (FTE). For example, FTE for a half-time staff member would be 0.5.

 

11) Does your school employ a sustainability coordinator, director, or manager?

Your response may include faculty/staff who, in addition to their regular responsibilities, are overseeing campus sustainability initiatives (similar to the responsibilities of a full-time sustainability coordinator). For those faculty/staff partially assigned to sustainability work, please indicate time allotted for sustainability efforts in full-time equivalent (FTE).

Yes

 

Please provide details below.

 

Title:  Sustainability Coordinator

Department:  Sustainability Department

Time worked (in FTE):  40 hours/week

Job description:  Position Summary:  The Sustainability Coordinator at Luther College is charged with helping the college achieve its specific sustainability goals and reducing the environmental impact of the institution as a whole.  The Sustainability Coordinator engages students, faculty, and staff in sustainability initiatives related to campus operations, student life, and teaching and research.  Qualifications:  Bachelors degree required, masters preferred, in an area related to sustainability and/or higher education. A minimum of two years work experience required in higher education or sustainability initiatives is preferred.  Experience in environmental or sustainability education, student life work, and grant writing preferred.  Excellent oral and written communication skills required.   Primary Responsibilities:  1. Campus Operations:  Work with Facilities staff and the Campus Sustainability Council to: a. Develop and promote a culture of conservation on campus among students, faculty, and staff.   b. Develop and implement strategies to achieve reductions in solid waste disposal as well as campus energy and water consumption. c. Develop and monitor sustainable purchasing policies of local foods and recycled goods. d. Manage the collection, organization and distribution of data in order to monitor performance and evaluate progress toward achieving Luther’s sustainability goals. e. Collaborate on recommendations to reduce the College’s greenhouse gas emissions via investments in renewable energy and other technologies.  2. Student Life: Work with Student Life and Residence Life staff to: a. Integrate sustainability issues into new student orientation. b. Develop programs to help students learn how they can become good stewards of personal and college resources in the dorms and elsewhere on campus with regard to recycling, energy consumption, etc.    3. Teaching and Research: Work with the Dean of the College and the Campus Sustainability Council to: a. Integrate sustainability education in teaching and research across as many academic disciplines as possible. b. Organize campus-wide sustainability programming such as seminars, workshops, and conferences. c. Provide teaching resources to faculty and occasionally teach about sustainability issues.  4. Other:   a. Collaborate with the director of the Center for Sustainable Communities on sustainability initiatives in the Decorah area and in the wider community. b. Serve as an ex officio member of the Campus Sustainability Council. c. Research sustainability issues for the administration and the Campus Sustainability Council. d. Serve as a clearinghouse for information regarding sustainability initiatives at Luther. e. Collaborate with Public Information to publicize campus sustainability initiatives. f. Assist in fundraising, grant writing, and budgeting for sustainability initiatives. g. Assist with obligations associated with Luther’s participation in the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment.

 

12) Please list the titles and a brief job description for all other full- and part-time staff who are engaged in planning, implementing or managing sustainability initiatives on your campus (e.g. Assistant Sustainability Coordinator, Food Services Sustainability Coordinator, Green Office Program Manager).

Your response may include faculty/staff who, in addition to their regular responsibilities, are overseeing campus sustainability initiatives (similar to the responsibilities of a full-time sustainability coordinator). For those faculty/staff partially assigned to sustainability work, please indicate time allotted for sustainability efforts (in FTE).Your response may include graduate assistants.

 

Your response should exclude academic researchers, administrative assistants, technical support staff, and recycling/compost collections staff. Your response should also exclude information about undergraduate student interns and student employees. This information should be provided in the Student Involvement section of the survey (questions 56-61).

 

Title      

 

Department      

 

Time worked (in FTE)      

 

Job description

Assistant Sustainability Coordinator

 

Sustainabilty

 

40 hours/week

 

Same as above

Associate Professor of Social Work

 

Social Work

 

.10

 

Chair of Sustainability Council, Greening of Germany J-term trip leader

Executive Director of Communications and Marketing

 

Communications/Marketing

 

.10

 

Directly supervises Sustainability Coordinators, member of Sustainabilitiy Council

Professor of Religion and Res. Chair in Ethics and Public Life

 

Religion

 

.25

 

Chair of Energy and Water Task Group of the Sustainability Council, lead implementer of the wind turbine project, helped develop Energy Conservation Program, writes grants for energy efficiency upgrades

Director of Environmental Studies

 

Environmental Studies

 

.25

 

Advises class projects related to sustainability, Chair of Food, Purchasing and Waste Task Group, as well as Land Use Committee of the Sustainability Council. Works closely with the Sustainability Coordinators, authored Climate Action Plan, highly involved with the Upper Midwest Association for Campus Sustainability, visionary for the Center for Sustainable Communities, works with donors who have sustainability-related interests

Assistant Professor of Economics

 

Economics and Business

 

.10

 

Chair of Student Learning Task Group of the Sustainability Council

President

 

President's Office

 

.10

 

Fundraises for sustainability initiatives, helps develop the vision for the sustainability program, attends Sustainability Council meetings, speaks to internal and external audiences about sustainability at Luther College

Assistant Professor of English

 

English

 

.10

 

Member of Sustainability Council, participant of Student Learning Task Group

Professor of German, Director of Sense of Vocation Program

 

Modern Languages

 

.20

 

Coordinates Greening of the Churches internships, co-facilitator of Greening of Germany J-term trip, co-authored grant to ACM to explore sustainability in the curriculum with peer institutions, plans Greening of the Churches Conference at Luther

Manager of Trade Services

 

Facilities

 

.10

 

Member of Energy and Water Task Group, Highly involved with wind turbine project, oversees campus trades people and encourages them to think about sustainability in their work

Director of Facilities

 

Facilities

 

.10

 

Writes grants for sustainability related projects (most recently permeable paving project), calculates carbon footprint and reports to peer institutions, member of Energy and Water Task Group, instrumental in the creation of the Sustainable Living House, manages college fleet and has facilitated the purchase of many electric vehicles and hybrids for the campus

Production Manager

 

Dining Services

 

.10

 

Builds relationships with local producers and has been instumental in Luther moving towards it's goal of 35% local food by 2011, coordinates accurate signage in the cafeteria and organizes producer visits to campus, helps determine what to plant in the Luther Garden

General Manager

 

Dining Services

 

.10

 

Oversees local foods initiative, supports waste reduction initiatives, builds relationships with local producers

Grounds Maintenance

 

Grounds

 

.10

 

Works with landscape architects to develop planting plans, incorporates many native species into the landscape, was instrumental in creating the edible landscaping garden at Luther this year

Cook

 

Dining Services

 

.10

 

Helps plan menus that incorporate local ingredients, worked with garden planners to determine what to plant for this growing season, leads local foods tours with students

Director of Residence Life

 

Student Life

 

.10

 

Worked to develop a policy that encourages students to bring appropriately sized and energy efficient appliances to campus, instrumental in the creation and planning of the Sustainable Living House

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WEBSITE


13) Does your school have a website detailing its sustainability initiatives?

If yes, please provide URL

http://www.luther.edu/sustainability/

 

GREEN PURCHASING


14) Does your school have a formal green purchasing policy?

No

 

If yes, please indicate the areas to which your policy pertains, and whether purchase is required or encouraged:

 

 

 

Required      

 

Encouraged      

Appliances

 

[  ]

 

[  ]

Cleaning products

 

[  ]

 

[  ]

Computers/electronics

 

[  ]

 

[  ]

Lighting

 

[  ]

 

[  ]

Office supplies

 

[  ]

 

[  ]

Paper products

 

[  ]

 

[  ]

Reduced packaging for purchases               

 

[  ]

 

[  ]

Other. Please describe below.

 

[  ]

 

[  ]


Other description: Though we have no formal policies in place, we do purchase many green products, including nearly 100% energy star certified appliances, CFL/LED lightbulbs, low flow shower heads and faucets, recycled/FSC/Chlorine-free paper products (napkins, toilet paper, paper towels, computer paper), 95% green cleaning products, etc.

 

15) Please indicate in which categories you regularly purchase ENERGY STAR qualified products. Check all that apply.  If possible, provide the percentage of products purchased that are ENERGY STAR qualified for each category.

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage purchased  

 

Description

[X]

 

Appliances

 

 

[X]

 

Building products

 

 

[X]

 

Computers/electronics     

 

99%

 

Apple, Dell, and HP desktop, laptop, and notebook computers. Dell monitors, printers

[X]

 

Heating and cooling

 

 

[X]

 

Lighting and fans

 

 

[X]

 

Plumbing

 

 

 

Additional comments: While there is no formal policy in place at this time, since signing the President's Climate Commitment, we have increased purchasing of energy star appliances across campus and follow an unwritten policy. We are in the process of developing a formal policy that will help guide purchasing even further in this direction.

 

16)  Does your school purchase environmentally preferable paper products (e.g., 100 percent post-consumer recycled content, certified by the Forest Stewardship Council)?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

For each of the items below, please indicate the percentage of purchases that contain post-consumer recycled content, are chlorine-free processed, and/or are Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified. Please provide approximate data, to the best of your ability, if your institution uses a decentralized purchasing structure.

               

 

 

Percentage
post-consumer
recycled content     

 

Percentage
Forest Stewardship
Council certified   

 

Percentage
chlorine-free
 processed     

 

Description

Envelopes

 

 

 

 

Facial tissues

 

 

 

 

Napkins

 

100%

 

 

100%

 

Notepads

 

 

 

 

Office paper

 

100%

 

50%

 

100%

 

Paper towels

 

100%

 

 

100%

 

EcoSoft™ roll towels are made of 100% recycled paper and contain a minimum 40% post-consumer waste, which meets EPA guidelines.

Other. Please describe.

 

100%

 

 

 

Toilet Paper- EcoSoftTM bath tissue is 100% recycled and contains a minimum of 20% post-consumer waste, which meets EPA guidelines.

 

Additional comments:

 

17)  Does your school purchase computers or electronics that are Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) certified?

Yes

 

If yes, please describe below.

Please indicate the portion of computer or electronics purchases that are EPEAT certified. Please provide the percentage of each product purchased that is EPEAT certified, where data are available. Note which products have been purchased in the “Product description” column (e.g., desktop computers, laptops).

 

 

 

Portion
EPEAT certified      

 

Percentage
EPEAT certified      

 

Product description (e.g. computers, printers)

Product 1

 

All

 

100%

 

Monitors

Product 2

 

Some

 

99%

 

Computers

Product 3

 

 

 

 

FUNDING MECHANISMS

 

18)  What mechanisms does your school use to fund sustainability projects on campus? Check and describe all that apply. If no specific mechanisms are in place, indicate as such and move on to question 19.

Data collected for this question is for informational purposes only and will not be evaluated for grading.

 

[  ]  No specific mechanisms are in place.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[  ]

 

Alumni green fund

 

[X]

 

Capital budget

 

Capital budget monies were used to purchase equipment for our Backyard Wilderness Pursuits Program and the Luther College Gardens.

[X]

 

Endowment investment in on-campus sustainability projects    

 

Currently the sustainability program is utilizing money from three different endowments. One endowment supports the salary of one sustainability coordinator, another supports the Luther College Gardens and a Wellness endowment provides support to programs such as the bike share program, which are a collaboration between wellness and sustainability. We are in the process of fundraising for our Sesquicentennial Fund, a portion of which is dedicated to sustainability. We are raising $5,000,000 for the Center for Sustainable Communities, which will endow the Campus Sustainability Coordinator position, Center Director, Student Sustainability Internships and Center Programs and Initiatives, including; Community Energy Systems, Sustainable Food Systems, Environmental/Education Outreach and Sustainable Business and Entrepreneurship

[X]

 

Operating budget

 

The Assistant Sustainability Coordinator's salary comes from the operating budget

[  ]

 

Revolving loan fund for sustainability projects

 

[  ]

 

Student green fee

 

[X]    

 

Other. Please describe.

 

Revenue generated from the sale of items no longer wanted by Luther.  In the past this revenue went into Facilities budget.  The sustainability department is now in charge of selling these items and gets to keep the revenue.  The selling of produce from the Student Gardens also is used to fund sustainability projects on campus..

 

EMPLOYEE OUTREACH OPPORTUNITIES

19) What programs does your school facilitate that encourage sustainable behavioral change among departments, offices, faculty and staff? Check all that apply.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[X]

 

Departmental sustainability liaisons

 

This year a sustainability work study student began to conduct interviews with one member of various departments across campus to learn more about their sustainability initiatives so we can highlight their work on our website.  These connections have led to people across campus keeping us updated on the sustainability-related happenings in their department and seems to have led to an increased consciousness around such things.

[X]

 

Green office certification program

 

Green Office certification criteria was developed and tested during the 2009-10 academic year.  One of the sustainability work study students developed this program and we will be implementing it during the upcoming academic year.

[X]

 

Green office tips posted online or on staff bulletin boards

 

Yes.  http://luther.edu/sustainability/initiatives/energy/tips/

[X]

 

Incorporation of sustainability issues into new employee orientation

 

New faculty receive a packet about sustainability at Luther, including ways to get involved.

[X]

 

Other

 

We've begun to accept nominations for a Sustainability Award, which is given to employees in departments all over campus for their innovative sustainability ideas.  Thus far we have awarded 2 staff members with the Sustainability Award.  We also started a quarterly update that is posted to our site, e-mailed to a list of 65 people who signed up to receive updates (many faculty and staff make this list up).  https://luther.edu/sustainability/cottonwood/


Back to top

 

CLIMATE CHANGE & ENERGY

 

Please note: Unless otherwise indicated, when providing data about greenhouse gas emissions levels, please provide data based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions. Scope 1 emissions refer to GHG emissions directly resulting from sources owned or operated by the institution (e.g. on-campus combustion of fossil fuels, emissions from campus vehicles). Scope 2 emissions refer to emissions generated indirectly due to the production of electricity that the institution consumes. Scope 3 emissions refer to all other indirect emissions that result from activities of the institution (e.g. employee travel).

 

GREENHOUSE GAS INVENTORY


20)
Has your school completed a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventory? Please check all that apply.

The year the inventory was started (rather than ended) should be the year of the inventory. For example, if you began an inventory in June 2008, this would be your 2008 inventory.

[  ]  No
[  ]  In progress. Please describe status and provide estimated completion date:

[X]  Yes.  Please provide total annual GHG emissions (Scopes 1 & 2, as well as scopes 1, 2 & 3 in metric tons of CO2e). Include the start date for each year as well as the URL to each inventory, if available online, or attach the document.

 

 

Start Date          

 

Emissions level

(Scopes 1 & 2)

 

Emissions level

(Scopes 1, 2 & 3)

 

URL          

 

Notes

2009

 

     

 

 

 

 

2008

 

June 2008

 

14,603

 

17,108

 

http://www.luther.edu/sustainability/initiatives/energy/carbonfootprint/

 

2007

 

June 2007

 

14,996

 

18,318

 

http://www.luther.edu/sustainability/initiatives/energy/carbonfootprint/

 

2006

 

June 2006

 

14,026

 

17,658

 

http://www.luther.edu/sustainability/initiatives/energy/carbonfootprint/

 

2005

 

June 2005

 

14,853

 

18,299

 

http://www.luther.edu/sustainability/initiatives/energy/carbonfootprint/

 

 

 

 

COMMITMENT TO GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTION

 

21) Has your school made a commitment to reduce GHG emissions a specific amount by a target year?

The commitment should be to reducing actual campus greenhouse gas emissions, and does not include offsets or renewable energy credits (purchase of RECs is addressed in question 31). For example, if the university is committed to reaching carbon neutrality by 2030, and aims to do so by reducing campus emissions by 50 percent and buying offsets for the remaining 50 percent, you would indicate “50%” as the reduction level.

Yes


If yes, please list details below.

 

Reduction level (percentage): 50%

Baseline year: 2003

Baseline emissions level: 21,412

Target year: 2012

 

Additional comments: Luther’s five-year strategic plan includes a goal to reduce the campus carbon footprint by 50 percent.  The College has developed an Integrated Renewable Energy and Campus Sustainability Initiative to achieve this strategic goal that relies on efficiency upgrades, renewable energy generation, limited use of local carbon offsets, and energy conservation education.  Some elements of this initiative are already in implementation while others are planned for the next few years.  What follows is our current plan for achieving the 50% reduction target.Efficiency Upgrades:  In 2004 Luther invested $1.5 million in various energy efficiency measures through a contract with our utility partner, Alliant Energy.  This investment has reduced the College's peak emissions by 15.5 percent.  Luther has also committed to all major construction projections meeting LEED standards.  This includes a new science building that is LEED gold and two major renovations built to LEED standards.   Additional efficiency retrofits are planned in the near future.Renewable Energy Generation:Wind:  Luther plans to install a 1.65 megawatt wind turbine on a highly visible bluff one mile from campus.  The turbine will generate 4.935 million kilowatt hours (kWh) of net production per year, which is equivalent to almost 33 percent of Luther's consumption of 14.9 million kWh in fiscal year 2009.  The turbine will generate renewable energy certificates that will offset an additional 2,798 MT of greenhouse gas emissions.  When these reductions are combined with reduced transmission and distribution losses, the wind turbine project will reduce a total of 3,094 MT of emissions, which represents an additional 14.5 percent reduction from our peak emissions in FY2004.  Luther hopes to complete this turbine project by summer 2010.Biomass:  Luther plans to address emissions from campus heating and domestic hot water through installation of a biomass boiler (or similar gasification system) that will work in tandem with Luther's existing heating plant.  One 400 horsepower wood fired boiler would supply approximately 59,502 MMBtu of steam heat and displace approximately 62 percent of the college's natural gas consumption.  This biomass heating plant would offset another 3,185 MT of greenhouse gas emissions, enabling Luther to reduce its peak campus carbon footprint by an additional 14.2 percent.  Carbon Offsets:  Luther’s strategic plan called for limited use of carbon offsets with a clear preference for regional projects with known entities.  Luther College has contracted to purchase the entire production of renewable energy certificates (RECs) from a community wind project in St. Ansgar, IA that was recently commissioned in November 2008.  The turbine is projected to produce at least 2.5 million kilowatt hours of electricity per year. The related RECs will offset an additional 1,418 MT of greenhouse gas emissions, enabling Luther to reduce its peak campus carbon footprint by an additional 7.4 percent.  Energy Conservation Education:  Recognizing that a meaningful and lasting reduction in Luther's carbon footprint needs to include both technological and behavioral change, Luther has hired a team of consultants to help us create an energy conservation program for the college.  The program will aim to nurture a campus-wide culture of conservation.  Luther recently hired two full time sustainability coordinators who are helping with this work and secured a $45,000 grant from the Rocky Mountain Institute for its energy conservation campaign.  Our goal is to have a revised program in hand by the end of January 2010 so we can begin implementing a comprehensive energy conservation program at Luther.  Luther hopes to demonstrate an annual reduction of 1-2% in greenhouse gas emissions as a result of this conservation campaign.Additional Strategies: With over 80% of Luther’s carbon footprint coming from electricity and heating, the above measures are the cornerstones of our strategy for emission reductions. At the same time, however, Luther is committed to taking all available steps to reduce energy usage and emissions, including the following:    * Fleet vehicles: The College’s fleet now includes eight hybrid vehicles, seven all electric vehicles, and one compressed natural gas truck.  All diesel vehicles, including lawn mowers, run on biodiesel made on campus from waste vegetable oil collected from the college cafeteria.  Luther is committed to continuing to shift its fleet to alternative fuel and ultra low emission vehicles.    * Solar:  While investments in efficiency and wind energy are primary strategies for reducing emissions from electricity, the College commissioned a feasibility study for a small scale solar photovoltaic (PV) system.  In addition, Luther is studying solar hot water as an option for heating the college swimming pool in the near future.    * Carbon sequestration:  Luther College owns approximately 1,000 acres of land, roughly two thirds of which are natural lands in forest, prairie, wetland, and savanna.  Luther students and faculty are studying options for maximizing carbon sequestration on college lands and the college is updating land management plans through its Land Use Committee.  The College recently placed roughly 130 acres of river bottom land in a permanent conservation easement through the Natural Resources Conservation Service.    * Waste reduction:  The strategic plan calls for a reduction in solid waste of 25% and Luther is pursuing multiple strategies to meet this goal.  The College’s Sustainability Program is researching ways to divert more material from the waste stream through improved recycling and composting, increased education, and waste reduction events.     * Local foods:  Luther has been working on sustainability in food service for many years with a particular emphasis on local foods.  These efforts were formalized with a strategic plan goal that 35% of all food purchases would be local within five years.  The College should pass the halfway mark this year with nearly 20% local purchases.  Supporting our local food system has many benefits including reduced carbon emissions.Added together, these mitigation strategies will dramatically reduce Luther’s carbon footprint.  Specifically, the investments in energy efficiency (15.5%), biomass energy (14.2%), wind energy (14.5%), and renewable energy certificates (7.4%) will enable Luther College to cut its peak greenhouse gas emissions by more than 50%.

 

REALIZED GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS

22) Has your school achieved a reduction in GHG emissions? Answer should be based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions.

Please indicate whether your school has achieved actual reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. This does not include the purchase of carbon offsets or renewable energy credits. (Purchase of RECs is considered in question 31.)

Yes


If yes, please list details below.

 

Percentage reduced: 20.1%

Baseline year: 2003-04

Baseline emissions level: 21,412

Year achieved: 2008

 

Additional comments:

 

23) Please provide GHG emissions figures in terms of gross square feet on campus for the past four years. Answers should be based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions.
Per-gross-square-foot emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total maintained building space

 

The year the inventory was started (rather than ended) should be the year of the inventory. For example, if you began an inventory in June 2008, this would be your 2008 inventory.

 

 

 

2009:

 

2008:

 

.009906

2007:

 

.010677

2006:

 

.009986

2005:

 

.0107


24) Please provide GHG emissions figures per full-time student equivalent for the past four years. Answers should be based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions.

Per full-time student equivalent emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total number of full-time equivalent students.

 

The year the inventory was started (rather than ended) should be the year of the inventory. For example, if you began an inventory in June 2008, this would be your 2008 inventory.

 

 

 

2009:

 

2008:

 

6.0

2007:

 

6.1

2006:

 

5.7

2005:

 

5.9

 

ENERGY EFFICIENCY                                                 

 

25) Has your school achieved a reduction in building energy consumption compared to a 2005 baseline?

Yes


If yes, please list details below.

Data must be provided in terms of MBtus (one thousand British thermal units) .

2005 baseline year
Building energy consumption:
  147,063 
Gross square feet of building space:   1,388,120

Performance year (most recent year for which data are available)

Building energy consumption 155,809

Gross square feet of building space :  1,476,547

26) Please indicate which programs or technologies your school has implemented to improve energy efficiency since 2000. Check all that apply.
[  ]    Cogeneration

[X]    Temperature setbacks

[X]    Steam trap systems

 

For the following technologies and programs, please indicate the percentage of possible campus building space in which they have been implemented.

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of building space

[  ]

 

Back pressure turbines

 

[  ]

 

Economizers

 

[X]

 

Energy management system; building automation system, energy information system, or monitoring-based commissioning (MBCx) system

 

80

[  ]

 

Gas-fired hydronic heating systems

 

[X]

 

Heat recovery systems

 

13

[X]

 

LED lighting

 

25

[X]

 

Lighting sensors

 

15

[  ]

 

Metering—chilled water

 

[X]

 

Metering—electric

 

85

[  ]

 

Metering—steam

 

[X]

 

Other energy-efficient lighting (e.g. T5 or T8)

 

75

[X]

 

Performing system tune-ups

 

[X]

 

Retrocommissioning of HVAC systems (buildings must have been commissioned, retrocommissioned or re-commissioned within the last 10 years)

 

13

[  ]

 

Steam turbines

 

[  ]

 

Steam-line insulation

 

[X]

 

Timers for temperature control

 

[X]

 

Variable speed drives

 

58

[X]

 

Vending machine sensors

 

100%  of machines

[  ]

 

Other. Please describe below.

 

 .

 

Description:


27) What programs does your school facilitate that encourage members of the campus community to reduce energy use? Check all that apply.

[X]

 

Audits or investigations of individual energy use 

[  ]

 

Cash incentives for energy reductions among departments

[  ]

 

Energy monitoring website or dashboard displays for buildings

[  ]

 

Energy reduction competitions among departments and/or offices

[X]

 

Fume hoods in science buildings

[X]

 

Green IT policies (e.g. enabling power management)

[X]

 

PR campaigns (increased/innovative signage, newsletters, slogans, saturation), demonstrations to raise awareness, pledge drives    

[  ]

 

Trade-in or rebate programs for inefficient appliances (e.g. CFLs, refrigerators)

[X]

 

Other. Please describe: Energy Competition during the month of February                                                         

 

RENEWABLE ENERGY GENERATION

 

28) Does your school generate renewable energy?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

Please check all types of renewable energy that are generated, and provide data on the percentage of your total energy consumption fulfilled by each renewable source listed. If less than one percent is fulfilled by a given source, leave percent box blank. For each type of renewable energy, please describe the production source.

 

 

 

Renewable
energy type

 

Percent of
total energy
consumption    

 

Production
source description

[  ]

 

Biomass

 

 

[  ]

 

Concentrated solar power

 

 

[X]

 

Geothermal (shallow depth)

 

 

Center for the Arts (59,825 sq. ft.), Baker Village (33,632 sq. ft), Baker Commons (4,114 sq. ft)= 6.6% of total building square footage

[  ]

 

Low-impact hydropower

 

 

[  ]

 

Photovoltaics

 

 

[  ]

 

Wind

 

 

[  ]

 

Other. Please specify below.    

 

 

 

Other description:


29) Does your school have solar hot water systems?

No

 

If yes, please specify number of systems and total MBtus generated annually, if available.

 

Number of systems:

Total MBtus generated annually:

 

RENEWABLE ENERGY PURCHASE

 

30) What is the fuel mix of electricity purchased from the grid for your campus? Please provide the percentage for each source.

If less than one percent of a source is purchased, leave the percent box blank.

 

Energy source

 

Percent of total energy purchase

Coal

 

55.02

Natural Gas

 

5.68

Nuclear

 

20.92

Petroleum

 

Renewables (biomass, solar, wind, low-impact hydropower, photovoltaics, geothermal)      

 

3.56

Other. Please specify:

 

14.80

Purchased

Percentage of overall electricity consumption purchased from the grid: 100%


31) Has your school purchased electric energy from renewable sources or renewable energy credits (RECs)?
RECs and electricity from renewable sources must be Green-e Certified or meet the requirements of the Green-e standards .

Yes

 

If yes, please describe below.

Date of most recent purchase:   2009-2010
Length of contract:   3 years
Average annual quantity (kWh):   1,237,600
Average percentage of your total annual electric energy use that it represents:   8.25%

 

ON-SITE COMBUSTION

 

32) Please provide total MBtus of energy for heating and cooling generated annually from on-site combustion:

104,124

 

33) Please list each fuel source used in on-site combustion for heating and cooling, and note the percentage of overall BTUs derived from that source:
If less than one percent of a source is purchased, leave the percent box blank.

 

Energy Source    

 

Percent of overall BTUs   

Biomass

 

Coal

 

Geothermal

 

Natural gas

 

100

Petroleum

 

Other. Please specify:

 

     

Back to top

 

FOOD & RECYCLING

Please note: The food portion of this category and information about waste reduction in dining services is covered in a separate dining survey .

 

WASTE REDUCTION

 

34) Please provide the following information pertaining to trends in waste generation per weighted campus user.

2005 baseline year

Weighted campus users:  2,515.75
Total waste generated (garbage + recycling + compost):   766 tons of garbage (no data for recycling, compost)
 

Performance year (most recent year for which data are available)
Weighted campus users:
 2,526.75
Total waste generated (garbage + recycling + compost):  536 tons of garbage (no data for recycling, compost)

 

RECYCLING OF TRADITIONAL MATERIALS

 

35) Please indicate which traditional materials your institution recycles. Check all that apply.

[  ]

 

None

[X]

 

Aluminum

[X]

 

Cardboard

[  ]

 

Glass

[X]

 

Paper

[  ]

 

Plastics (all)

[X]

 

Plastics (some)

[X]

 

Other. Please list: Redeemables, phones, printer cartridges, computers, cooking oil, building materials, cfl light bulbs    

 

36) Please indicate the campus-wide diversion rate of recyclable waste from traditional disposal.

The diversion rate should be calculated based on the diversion of traditional recyclables (paper, plastics, aluminum, cardboard, glass). Please do not include recycled electronic waste, recycled construction waste, or composted food and landscaping waste in the calculation of this figure.

The diversion rate is equal to the (total amount of traditional recycled materials) divided by the (total amount of landfill waste plus the total amount of traditional recycled materials).

No way to measure recycling as the company we work with doesn't have the capacity. N/A

 

RECYCLING OF ELECTRONIC WASTE


37) Does your institution have an electronics recycling program?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

Please indicate recycling of the following items is available for students (through receptacles on campus, recycling drives, or other means), and/or for institutional electronics waste. Check all that apply.

 

 

 

For waste generated by students  

 

For waste generated by the institution

Batteries

 

[X]

 

[X]

Cell phones

 

[X]

 

[X]

Computers

 

[X]

 

[X]

Light bulbs

 

[  ]

 

[X]

Printer cartridges

 

[X]

 

[X]

Other E-waste. Please list items:

 

[  ]

 

[  ]



If possible, describe the organization and/or company you are using to collect your e-waste for recycling, and the environmental and social safeguards that they take in disposal:

Cell phones are recycled through the Wireless Alliance.Light bulbs are picked up by Retrofit Recycling

 

COMPOSTING (APART FROM DINING FACILITIES)


38) What percentage of your campus's landscaping waste is composted or mulched?

100%


39) Do you provide composting receptacles around campus in locations other than dining halls (e.g., in residence halls, offices, academic buildings)?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

[  ]  

 

Academic buildings

[X]  

 

Offices

[  ]  

 

Outdoors

[X]  

 

Residence halls

 

Description:

Luther students have started disposing of fruit and vegetable waste in worm composting bins installed Jan. 15 in seven of Luther’s residence halls by students from the Luther Sustainability program.   Students are asked to place their fruit and vegetable food waste, as well as shredded newspapers, paper receipts and old class notes in the compost bins where red worms will convert it to organic matter that will become rich, black loam soil in the Luther Gardens.A few offices also have vermicomposting bins, including the Environmental Studies office.  The Publications Office will be obtaining a bin soon too.Video about vermicomposting at Luther: http://luther.edu/sustainability/initiatives/waste_recycling/vermicomposting/

 

SOURCE REDUCTION


40) Does your campus run any source-reduction initiatives (e.g., end-of-semester furniture or clothing swaps and collections)?

Yes

 

If yes, please check and describe all of the programs below that are in place at your institution:

 

 

 

 

Description

[X]  

 

Limited printing

 

Luther's print limit system, Go Print, was implemented in Fall 2009.  Between 2009 and 2010, we saw a drop of over 668,000 printed pages or a drop of 35.8%.  This is roughly three pallets of paper (40 boxes per pallet, 1 box = 5,000 sheets).

[X]  

 

Move-in waste reduction

 

For the past few years Luther has added additional recycling receptacles at the time of move-in to capture all the cardboard and other recyclables associated with the move to college.  This has helped to keep many resources out of the landfill.

[X]  

 

Move-out waste reduction

 

This year we made a concerted effort to collect more recyclables upon moveout and to make it as easy for students to recycle as it is to throw everything in the trash.  Our tipping fees for the month of May have always been really high, but as we've increased our collection efforts and expanded Trash to Treasures programming, we are seeing the costs decrease as an increasing amount of usable items are reused by other people.

[X]  

 

Year-round materials exchange programs     

 

This year the Sustainability Department transformed a big barn, which was previously used for storage into a Reuse Store, where large items that the college no longer needs are sold once a month.  Members of the Decorah community enjoy the sale as they are able to pick up many quality items for very inexpensive.  This new initiative has kept many items from ending up in the landfill and is providing another revenue stream for the Sustainability Department's initiatives.

[X]  

 

Other

 

Office Reuse Station: This was developed by one of our sustainability work study students.  It is housed in a spare office in the Environmental Studies Office Suite.  People can drop off unwanted office supplies and pick up whatever they see that they might need free of charge.


Back to top

 

GREEN BUILDING

 

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION


41) Does your school have a formal green building policy pertaining to design and construction for new buildings and major renovations?

Yes

 

If yes, please describe policy and provide URL to the full policy, if available:

All new campus construction will be built to at least the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED Silver standard or equivalent.http://www.luther.edu/sustainability/commitments/


42) Please provide the following information about LEED-certified buildings on your campus:

Total number of LEED-certified buildings: 1

 

 

 

Combined gross square footage:      

 

Building name(s):

Certified-level   

 

  

 

Silver-level

 

 

Gold-level

 

71997

 

Sampson Hoffland Laboratories

Platinum-level   

 

 

 

43) Please provide information about campus buildings that meet LEED certification criteria, but are not certified.

Total number of buildings that meet LEED criteria: 2

 

 

 

Combined gross square footage:    

 

Building name(s):

Certified-level criteria met, but not certified

 

5275  

 

Norby House (Residence Hall)

Silver-level criteria met, but not certified

 

103212  

 

Valders Hall of Science

Gold-level criteria met, but not certified

 

   

 

Platinum-level criteria met, but not certified   

 

   

 

 

44) Please provide information about buildings that are ENERGY STAR labeled.

Total number of ENERGY STAR buildings:  
0
Combined gross square footage:
Building names:

 

45) Please provide information about buildings on your campus that meet the standards of other third-party green building certifications (e.g. Green Globes).

Certification type:
  0
Total number of buildings:
     
Combined gross square footage: 

Building names:  

 

46) For the 2009-2010 academic year, what percentage of your institution's non-hazardous construction and demolition waste was diverted from landfills?

75%

 

ADAPTIVE REUSE

 

47) Please provide information about adaptive reuse projects your campus has completed since the year 2000.

Total number of adaptive reuse projects completed since the year 2000:   0


Please provide additional details for up to ten of the most comprehensive projects:

 

Project name     

 

Square footage  

 

Former use       

 

Current use      

 

Additional details

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


48) Please provide the student enrollment and gross square footage of buildings on campus in the 2000-2001 academic year.

 

Student enrollment (FTE):   2,562

Square footage:   1313067

 

49) Please provide the student enrollment and gross square footage of buildings on campus for the 2009-2010 academic year.

 

Student enrollment (FTE):   2,488

Square footage:   1474227

 

OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE


50) Does your school have a formal green building policy specifically pertaining to operations and maintenance?

No

 

If yes, please describe policy and provide URL to the full policy, if available:


51) Please provide the following information about LEED-EB certified buildings on your campus:

Total number of LEED-EB certified buildings:  0
Combined gross square footage: 
Building names:

 

52) Please provide the following information about buildings that meet LEED-EB certification criteria but are not certified:

Total number of buildings that meet LEED-EB criteria but are not certified: 1
Combined gross square footage:  5275
Building names: Norby House

 

 

WATER MANAGEMENT

 

53) Has your institution reduced its water consumption per weighted campus user, as compared to a 2005 baseline?
Weighted campus users = (1 * number of on-campus residents) + (0.75 * number of non-residential or commuter full-time students, faculty and staff members) + (0.5 * number of non-residential or commuter part-time students, faculty, and staff members) .

Yes

 

If yes, please provide the following information:

2005 baseline year
Weighted campus users:
  2515.75
Water consumed (gallons):  55,551,118

Performance year (most recent year for which data are available)
Weighted campus users:
  2526.75
Water consumed (gallons):   51,312,463

 

54) Please indicate which of the following water-conservation technologies have been installed in existing buildings on campus. Check all that apply. For each item, please indicate the percentage of possible campus building space in which the technology has been installed.

For example, if dual-flush toilets have been installed in all bathrooms on campus, you would indicate “100” as the percentage of building space in which the technology has been installed.

 

 

 

 

Percentage of building space     

[X]  

 

Building water metering

 

100%

[X]  

 

Dual-flush toilets

 

12.5%

[  ]  

 

Gray water systems

 

[  ]  

 

Laundry technology

 

[  ]  

 

Leak detection and reduction  

 

[X]  

 

Low-flow faucets

 

[X]  

 

Low-flow showerheads

 

100%

[  ]  

 

Non-potable water usage

 

[  ]  

 

Waterless urinals

 

[  ]  

 

Xeriscaping

 

N/A

[X]  

 

Weather-informed irrigation

 

N/A

[  ]  

 

Other. Please describe below.  

 

 

Other description:

 

55) What stormwater management technologies or strategies are used on your campus?

[  ]

 

Living or vegetated roofs  

[X]

 

Porous pavement

[X]

 

Retention ponds

[X]

 

Stone swales

[X]

 

Vegetated swales

[  ]

 

Other. Please describe:  

 

ENERGY MANAGEMENT

Information concerning energy management will be drawn from question 26 (Climate Change & Energy) . If you wish to provide any additional information about energy-efficiency technologies installed in campus buildings, please attach it in a supplemental document at the end of the survey.


Back to top

 

STUDENT INVOLVEMENT

 

RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITIES

 

56) Please list sustainability-themed residential communities or housing options at your school.

 A sustainability-themed residential community is created specifically to provide students with a living-and-learning experience focused on sustainability.  Students must have actively selected or applied to live in the residence. Example: Synergy House at Colorado College .

 

For each sustainability-themed residential community, please provide the following information:

 

Name of program     

 

Type of community     

 

Number of students involved     

 

Additional details

Sustainable Living House (LEFSE-Luther's Environmentally, Fiscally and Socially responsible Ediface)

 

House

 

10

 

The Sustainable Living House was adopted by the college as a new housing option following a strong student proposal to create such a house.  Students developed the constitution and brought the proposal to the Sustainability Council and President for approval.  We are in the process of renovating a house already owned by the college to accommodate the 10 students (9 residents, 1 RA) who will live in the home.  Students applied for residence and went through a series of interviews before being accepted.  Goals will be community outreach, learning how to live and learn in community, exploring a sustainable lifestyle.  The house will be keeping a video blog of their adventures so stay tuned to see what's to come from Luther's first Sustainable Living House!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION


57) Does a portion of your new student orientation specifically cover sustainability?

Yes

 

If yes, please check and describe all ways in which sustainability is incorporated into new student orientation:

[X]  

 

Skits, speakers, or presentations that take place in large venues that most or all first-year students attend. Topics must include at least one of the following: promoting the Office of Sustainability, student campus sustainability groups, or sustainability as an important campus issue.

[X]  

 

Incorporating sustainability information into presentations made by RAs to individual hallways.

[X]  

 

Active engagement of students in activities that raise awareness about sustainability, highlight how sustainability occurs on campus, or in which students take part in a productive activity, such as volunteer work or projects (e.g., working in the on-campus garden).

[X]  

 

Making orientation more sustainable through efforts such as a zero-waste meal or carbon offsets.

[X]  

 

Other. Please describe:

 The Sustainability Department gives a 15 minute long presentation to all students who participate in new student orientation. During the presentation we offer ways to get involved. Many of our strongest sustainability leaders first became interested in sustainability after hearing the presentation last fall.RAs receive information to pass along to their residents about recycling, composting and energy conservation. Many RAs choose to do bulletin boards related to sustainability on their floors as a way to move passively educate their residents.All new students participate in a service project during their first week on campus.  Most service projects are sustainability-related. Students have gone to Seed Savers to help collect heirloom seeds, helped out in the Luther College Gardens and cleaned bricks from an old school that was torn down in Decorah so they can be reused in other building projects.This past year Luther held its first zero-waste picnic on the library lawn. Students and their parents were invited to the meal and a good time was had by all. Members of the Green Team created signs to educate eaters about what was happening and why. We will be doing a zero-waste picnic again this year.

 

INTERNSHIPS/OUTREACH OPPORTUNITIES


58) Does your school offer on-campus, office-based sustainability internships or jobs for students during the academic year?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide the number of students and average number of hours worked weekly per student below.

 

 

 

Number of students:     

 

Average hours worked weekly per student:    

Paid positions

 

8

 

10

Unpaid positions

 

 


59) Does your school have residence hall Eco-Reps or a similar program to promote behavioral change on campus?

 

If yes, please provide the URL to the program's website. If not, select “no.”

No

 

Please provide the following details about the number of students involved in program, their average working hours, and any compensation that they receive.

 

 

 

Number of students:     

 

Average hours worked weekly per student:

Paid positions.

 

 

Positions that award academic credit.  

 

 

Uncompensated positions.

 

 

 

SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGES AND COMPETITIONS

 

60) Does your school organize any sustainability challenges/competitions for your campus and/or with other colleges?

Yes, one competition.

 

For each competition or challenge that is run on campus, please provide the details requested. You may provide detailed information for up to three competitions.

 

First Competition:

 

Competition Overview

 

Competition Name: Energy Evolution

Year Initiated: 2007

Website: http://www.luther.edu/sustainability/initiatives/energy/

 

Frequency that competition is run:   Once annually

 

Groups involved in coordinating the competition:

[X]

 

Students

[X]

 

Faculty

[X]

 

Staff

[X]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, please describe.  

 

Participants in the competition:

[X]

 

Students

[  ]

 

Faculty

[  ]

 

Staff

[  ]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, please describe:  

 

Incentives for participation:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Cash

 

[X]  

 

Non-monetary prizes  

 

Pizza Party, solar chargers, ipods

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

Goals of competition:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[X]  

 

Energy conservation  

 

We have theme weeks, three of which are related to energy conservation.  There is a focus on phantom loads, heat and electricy.

[  ]  

 

Waste reduction

 

[X]

 

Water conservation  

 

This year we focused on water for one week and in addition to reading electricity meters, we also read water meters.

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

Percent of energy and/or resource use reduction resulting from the competition:   Negligible.

Lasting effects of competition:   The one thing that really seems to get driven home during the competition is the concept of a phantom load.  Students who learned about this 3 years ago still are very conscious of unplugging their chargers when not in use.

Additional Information:   The competition was almost exclusively run by students, with funding coming from the Wellness Department, Facilities and Marketing/Communications, as well as much support from the Sustainability Office.  Students tabled outside of the cafeteria to promote the month's events, created bulletin boards that they then distributed to all bulletin boards in all residence halls on campus, helped facilitate hall events, calculated energy and water data, organized a kick-off concert and the party for the winning residence hall.  Additionally, nearly 50 volunteers turned out on two different nights to conduct energy audits of nearly every room on campus.

 

Second Competition:

 

Competition Overview

 

Competition Name:

Year Initiated:

Website:

 

Frequency that competition is run: 

 

Groups involved in coordinating the competition:

[  ]

 

Students

 

[  ]

 

Faculty

 

[  ]

 

Staff

 

[  ]

 

Administrators

 

[  ]

 

Other, please describe.  

 

 

Participants in the competition:

[  ]

 

Students

[  ]

 

Faculty

[  ]

 

Staff

[  ]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, describe:  

 

Incentives for participation:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Cash

 

[  ]  

 

Non-monetary prizes  

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

Goals of competition:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Energy conservation

 

[  ]  

 

Waste reduction

 

[  ]  

 

Water conservation  

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 


Percent of energy and/or resource use reduction resulting from the competition:  

Lasting effects of competition:  

Additional Information:  

 

Third Competition:

 

Competition Overview

 

Competition Name:

Year Initiated:

Website:

 

Frequency that competition is run:

 

Groups involved in coordinating the competition:

[  ]

 

Students

[  ]

 

Faculty

[  ]

 

Staff

[  ]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, please describe.

   

 

Participants in the competition:

[  ]

 

Students

[  ]

 

Faculty

[  ]

 

Staff

[  ]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, describe:

 

Incentives for participation:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Cash

 

[  ]  

 

Non-monetary prizes

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

Goals of competition:

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Energy conservation  

 

[  ]  

 

Waste reduction

 

[  ]  

 

Water conservation

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 


Percent of energy and/or resource use reduction resulting from the competition:  

Lasting effects of competition:  

Additional Information:  

 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS


61) Does your school have active student-run organizations devoted to sustainability efforts on campus?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide names of organizations, a brief description of each, and URLs for the organizations’ websites, if available:

Name

 

Description

 

URL

Environmental Concerns Organization

 

ECO has been in existance for nearly a decade and has taken on many environmentally-related campus-wide, national and world issues. The group has been a catalyst for getting local foods into the cafeteria, the move towards a trayless cafeteria, strong promotion of the Farm Bill and raising general consciousness of environmental issues on campus.  Group leaders and members work closely with the Sustainability Coordinators. ECO is split into three committees; campus action, campus education and community action.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brandt Hall Council Sustainability Committee

 

Hall Council's are becoming increasingly popular in Luther's residence halls.  Brandt Hall has an especially active hall council and one that has a specific interest in sustainability.  This year the sustainability committee organized a plant party where residents were invited to pot their own plant for their room in recycled containers.  Members also measured the flow coming out of the showerheads in the bathrooms and when they determined the flow to be too high they worked with a Sustainability Coordinator and College Plumber to develop a concept for testing low flow models in the residence halls.  The tests were successful and were expanded to 25 other floors on campus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Student Senate Campus Betterment Committee

 

The Campus Betterment committee is committed to issues such as improving availability of recycling bins on campus, bringing sustainable foods into the cafeteria and composting. The committee supported a proposal to fund the addition of a new recycling cabinet in a first year residence hall and provided sustainability updates to the Student Senate weekly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEEDS (Students Encouraging Economic Development through Solidarity

 

SEEDS is a campus group that is dedicated to the social justice piece of sustainability. Members are active with encouraging members of the campus community to lend money through KIVA to help out entrepreneurs all over the world. SEEDS brings speakers to campus and creates dialogue about social equality.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Green Team

 

The Green Team is a group of students that gets together at the beginning of the year to help out with First Year Orientation, move-in, the zero waste picnic and serving as general sustainability resources for incoming students. The group works in collaboration with the Student Life Office and Sustainability.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Back to top

 

TRANSPORTATION

 

CAMPUS MOTOR FLEET

 

62) How many vehicles are in your institution's fleet?
The fleet includes all vehicles owned by the campus such as cars, trucks, and carts. It does not include lawnmowers or other off-road vehicles.

74

 

63) Please indicate which of the following alternative-fuel vehicles are included in your fleet. Check all that apply. Please list the number of vehicles for each class.

 

 

 

 

Number of vehicles

[X]  

 

100 percent electric

 

6

[  ]  

 

Diesel-electric hybrid

 

[X]  

 

Fueled with B20 or higher biofuel for more than 6 months of the year

 

Biodiesel used in grounds lawn equipment and gators from spring-fall

[  ]  

 

Fueled with E85 or higher ethanol for more than 6 months of the year    

 

[X]  

 

Gasoline-electric hybrid

 

10

[  ]  

 

Hydrogen fueled

 

[  ]  

 

Plug-in hybrid

 

[  ]  

 

Other. Please describe:

 

 


COMMUTE MODAL SPLIT

64) What portion of the student body commutes via transportation methods other than single-occupancy vehicles (e.g., bicycle, walking, public transportation, carpool/vanpool)?

90%

 

If data are available, please provide the percentage of students who commute by each of the following means.

 

 

 

Percentage

Bicycle

 

Carpool/vanpool

 

Public transit

 

Single-occupancy vehicle    

 

Walking

 

 

65) What percentage of employees commute via transportation methods other than single-occupancy vehicles (e.g., bicycle, walking, public transportation, carpool)?

44%

 

If data are available, please provide the percentage of employees who commute by each of the following means.

 

 

 

Percentage

Bicycle

 

14%

Carpool/vanpool

 

14%

Public transit

 

0%

Single-occupancy vehicle    

 

56%

Walking

 

25%

 

LOCAL TRANSPORTATION ALTERNATIVES

 

66) Does your school offer incentives for carpooling to faculty, staff and/or students? Check all that apply, and describe below.

[X] No

[  ] Yes, to faculty and staff

[  ] Yes, to students

 

Description:  


Please check and describe carpooling incentives provided for faculty/staff . Check all that apply.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[  ]  

 

Carpool matching

 

[  ]  

 

Financial remuneration  

 

[  ]  

 

Preferential parking

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 


Please check and describe carpooling incentives provided for students . Check all that apply.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[  ]  

 

Carpool matching

 

[  ]  

 

Financial remuneration  

 

[  ]  

 

Preferential parking

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

67) Does your school offer subsidies for the use of public transportation?

 

 

 If not applicable, please explain:  There is no public transportation in Decorah.

 

 

 

Eligible community members:

 

Size of the discount (as a percent of full price)

[  ]  

 

Faculty

 

[  ]  

 

Staff

 

[  ]  

 

Students   

 


[   ]  Check here if subsidy takes the form of pre-tax payroll deduction. Please describe below:

 

68) Does your school provide free transportation around campus?

 

 

 If not applicable, please explain:  Our campus is small and this service is not required.

 

69) Does your school operate a free transportation shuttle to local off-campus destinations?

 

Starting Fall 2010 we will be doing two trips downtown twice a month (one weekday evening and one weekend day).  Students from an Environmental Philosophy class conducted a survey to determine optimal times to run the shuttle and anticipate use. They wrote a proposal to Student Senate for funding and it was approved so we have funds to cover the cost of the vehicle and a work study position to manage the shuttle. Our hope is to provide a way for students to get downtown without taking personal vehicles.

 

  

 

BICYCLE PROGRAM

 

70) Does your school offer a bicycle sharing/rental program?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.


Year created:   2008
Number of bikes available:   8
Usage fee per hour:     Free
Usage fee per day:    Free

 

Annual membership fee for students:  $0

Annual membership fee for faculty, staff, and administrators:   $0

Other annual membership fee:  $0

 

Description: Started in 2008, the Luther bikeshare program is a collaboration between Wellness and Sustainability.  Nearly 25% of the campus population has an active membership.  Bikes are checked out through the circulation desk at the library, which allows students to check out bikes most hours of the day.  There is no cost to use the bikes as our goal is to provide a free, reliable way for students to get around campus and town without relying on motorized vehicles. Bikes are stored in the barn over the winter and taken to the bike shop for tune-ups every spring. Students check out bikes, helmets and locks with their ids and are charged for any damages incurred to the bikes during the time they were using them. We haven’t, however, had many issues with damage. We are pleased with the success of the program and may look to expand in the future.

 

71) Does your school offer bicycle repair services?

No

 

If yes, please provide details below:


Year created:  
Service fee:  
Description:  

 

CAR SHARING PROGRAM

 

72) Does your school partner with a car-sharing program?

No

 

If yes, please provide details below.

Year created:  
Total number of vehicles: 
Number of hybrid vehicles:   
Usage fee per hour:  
Usage fee per day:  


Annual membership fee for students: 

Annual membership fee for faculty, staff, and administrators: 

Other annual membership fee: 

 

Description: We are currently in the process of evaluating the feasibility of bringing ZipCar or U Car Share to campus. Conversations have been happening over the course of the past academic year and we anticipate having something in place by Fall 2011. Our goal is provide yet another way for students to get around without bringing personal vehicles to campus.

 

PLANNING

 

73) Does your school have policies that support a pedestrian-friendly or bike-friendly campus (e.g., in the school's master plan, a policy prohibiting vehicles from the center of campus)?

The master facility plan calls for decreasing vehicle traffic within the campus. To support this Luther has done the following: 1) Luther offers to store student bikes during the winter at no cost, 2) A road that runs through campus was removed in order to make the campus safer for walkers and bikers and 3) Bike racks have been added in several locations on campus

 

74) Do you offer the option of a condensed work week or telecommuting to at least ten percent of full-time employees? For each option, please indicate who is eligible.

 

 

 

 

Employees eligible

 

Description:

[  ]  

 

Telecommuting

 

 

[  ]  

 

Condensed work week  

 

 

 

Additional comments: Luther does not offer these programs at this time.


Back to top

 

STATISTICS

 

75) Campus setting:        

Rural

 

76) Total number of buildings on campus:

42

 

77) Combined gross square footage of all buildings on campus: 

1,474,422

 

78) Full-time enrollment (undergraduate + graduate, headcount at start of academic year): 

2,470

 

79) Part-time enrollment (undergraduate + graduate, headcount at start of academic year): 

49

 

80) Percent of full-time students that live on campus: 

90%

 

 

OTHER AREAS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGAGEMENT

Question 81 is for informational purposes only; responses will NOT be included in the Report Card evaluation process.

 

81) Please check all items that apply to your institution:

 

 

 

 

 

Description (optional)

[X]    

 

Campus garden or farm

 

Faculty/Staff Community Gardens (27-20x20 plots), Edible Landscaping Plot in central campus, Heirloom Gardens and a Production Garden focused on more intensive production of fewer items.

 

 

 

 

 

[  ]    

 

Disposable water bottle ban

 

 

 

 

 

 

[X]     

 

Environmental science/studies major (undergraduate-level)

 

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Environmental science/studies minor or concentration (undergraduate-level)   

 

 

 

 

 

 

[  ]    

 

Graduate-level environmental studies program (graduate-level)

 

 

 

 

 

 

[  ]    

 

Graduate-level sustainability studies program

 

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Outdoors club

 

 

 

 

 

 

[  ]     

 

Participation in Recyclemania

 

 

 

 

 

 

[  ]    

 

Single-stream recycling

 

 

 

 

 

 

[  ]    

 

Student trustee position

 

 

 

 

 

 

[  ]    

 

Sustainability major, minor or concentration (undergraduate-level)   

 

 


Back to top

 

 

<< Back to Report Card

 

Powered by Olark