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Report Card 2011

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University of Minnesota

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With the publication of the College Sustainability Report Card 2011, more than 1,100 school survey responses from over 300 institutions are now available online. In total, these surveys offer more than 10,000 pages of data collected from colleges and universities during the summer of 2010 . To access surveys from other schools, go to the  surveys section  of the website. To see grades, or to access additional surveys submitted by this school, please click the "Back to Report Card" link at the beginning or end of the survey.

 

School name: University of Minnesota

Date submitted: October 1, 2010

 

ADMINISTRATION

 

SUSTAINABILITY POLICIES

 

1)  Does your school have its own formal sustainability policy and/or sustainability plan? Check all that apply.

[  ]  No

[X]  Yes, a sustainability policy. Please describe and provide the URL below.

[X]  Yes, a sustainability plan. Please describe and provide the URL below.

 

Description: The University of Minnesota Sustainability and Energy Efficiency Policy was adopted by the Board of Regents in 2004 and commits to incorporating sustainability into its teaching, research, and outreach and the operations that support them.  There are guiding principles in the areas of Leadership, Modeling, Operational Improvements, Research and Education and Outreach.http://www1.umn.edu/regents/policies/administrative/Sustain_Energy_Efficiency.pdfThe University of Minnesota Sustainability Goals and Outcomes Committee outlined the goals and outcome measures as the first step to implement the policy across the university system.  This framework was prepared with input from the campus community and the report was presented to the President and the Board of Regents in September 2009.   It is a high-level plan for sustainability at the University and also lays out the campus sustainability structure for implementing the goals. http://www.uservices.umn.edu/sustainableU/UM_Systemwide_Sustainability_Final_Report.pdfThe University Services Sustainability Steering Committee has begun tracking of key operations initiatives in the areas of Energy, Transportation, Dining Services, Purchasing, Building Standards, Waste, etc. that support the U goals.

 

2)  Has the president of your institution signed any commitments related to environmental stewardship and/or greenhouse gas reductions? Check all that apply.

[  ]  None

[X]  American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC)

[  ]  Talloires Declaration
[X]  Other. Please describe: Chicago Climate Exchange, AASHE STARS Charter Member


3)  Is there a sustainability component in your institution's master plan and/or strategic plan? Check all that apply.
[  ]  No
[X]  Yes, in the master plan. Please describe and provide the URL below.

[X]  Yes, in the strategic plan. Please describe and provide the URL below.

 

Description: Guiding Principle Ten states:  Develop a campus that is environmentally and operationally sustainable.  Specific references are made to prioritizing pedestrian movement and preserving and enhancing natural features and other sustainability oriented concepts are included: http://www.cppm.umn.edu/masterplan/Docs/TC_Master_Plan_Approved.pdfThe University strategic plan, Transforming the U, Exceptional Innovative Initiative advances the University’s strong environmental leadership in research.   The Institute on the Environment  (IonE) was formed in 2006 as a result of the university’s strategic positioning process.  It fosters leadership development, partnerships and multidisciplinary research to discover new solutions to the world’s most pressing environmental and sustainability problems. http://environment.umn.edu/about/index.html http://environment.umn.edu/research/index.html

 

ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEES

 

4)  Does your school have any administrative councils, committees or task forces that advise on and/or implement sustainability policies and programs?

You may provide detailed information for up to three committees. If you have one advisory committee that is broken down into subcommittees, please indicate that you have one committee and answer the questions on the following page for the entire committee (the sum of data for all subcommittees).

Yes

 

Please provide the number of committees: Three committees

 

Committee I

 

5)  Please provide the name of the committee and note the number of meetings held since August 2009.

 

Committee name: U of MN Sustainability Strategic Committee -  previously U-Wide Goals and Outcomes Committee (2009)

Number of meetings: 5

 

6)  Please provide the number of stakeholder representatives on the committee.

When providing the data on each stakeholder group, you should provide the total number across all subcommittees (you do not need to numerate individual tallies for subcommittees).

 

 

 

Number of representatives

Administrators

 

3

Faculty

 

7

Staff

 

9

Students

 

6

Other. Please describe.   

 

 

7)  Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents.

 

 

 

Name       

 

Position

Chair 1   

 

Vice President Kathleen O'Brien  

 

Administrator

Chair 2

 

Chancellor Jacqueline Johnson  

 

Administrator

Chair 3

 

   

 

 

8)  To whom does the committee report?
[X]  President/Chancellor
[  ]  Vice President/Vice Chancellor
[  ] Other:

 

9)  Please indicate the key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2009. For each issue addressed, please indicate and describe progress made.
“Moderate” progress indicates that issues were discussed thoroughly and projects are in the early stages of planning. “Significant” progress indicates that new policies or programs were implemented, or are in the final stages of planning and approval.

 

 

 

Addressed       

 

Progress     

 

Description

Academics

Examples: minor, major and concentration programs, curricular additions, research projects

 

[  ]

 

 

see administration section

Administration

Examples: procurement policies, institution-wide sustainability policy, sustainability-related staff positions

 

[X]

 

 

Systemwide goals and outcomes identified with input from university community. Were finalized and presented to the regents. Committee structure was established for advancing University goals as a system and to support campus efforts to meet commitments to AASHE STARS and ACUPCC. Goals apply to Academics, Climate, Energy, Green Building, Transportation, Waste and Water Reduction, Student Engagement, Academics, and Research

Climate

Examples: draft climate action plan, greenhouse gas emissions inventory

 

[  ]

 

 

see administration section

 

Endowment

Examples: proxy voting guidelines, investment advisory committees

 

[X]

 

Moderate

 

University Social Concerns committee is already in place. Topics included campus healthy foods initiative,  renewable energy, local foods programs and others

Energy

Examples: conservation/behavioral change programs, retrofits and efficiency improvements

 

[  ]

 

 

see administration section

Food

Examples: policies to increase purchase of local/sustainably produced foods, implementing campus gardens

 

[  ]

 

 

see administration section

Green Building

Examples: design or construction policy

 

[  ]

 

 

see administration section

Student Involvement

Examples:  speaker series, peer-to-peer residential sustainability education programs, student guide to sustainable living on campus

 

[X]

 

Moderate

 

Student Representation is included on the Committee

Transportation

Examples: incentives for use of environmentally-preferable commuting options, campus fleet improvements, connecting students with public transit     

 

[  ]

 

 

see administration section

Waste Reduction

Examples: recycling, composting, reducing consumption

 

[  ]

 

 

see administration section

 

Water

Examples: water conservation, reducing campus pollution, bottled water campaigns

 

[  ]

 

 

see administration section

Other

 

[  ]

 

 

 

Committee II

 

5b)  Please provide the name of the committee and note the number of meetings held since August 2009.

 

Committee name: Sustainability Studies Minor Curriculum Committee

Number of meetings: 3

 

6b)  Please provide the number of stakeholder representatives on the committee.

When providing the data on each stakeholder group, you should provide the total number across all subcommittees (you do not need to numerate individual tallies for subcommittees).

 

 

 

Number of representatives

Administrators

 

Faculty

 

26

Staff

 

Students

 

Other. Please describe.     

 

Education Sustainability Coordinator

 

7b)  Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents.

 

 

 

Name      

 

Position

Chair 1    

 

Todd Arnold

 

Faculty

Chair 2

 

 

Chair 3

 

 

 

8b)  To whom does the committee report?
[  ]  President/Chancellor
[  ]  Vice President/Vice Chancellor
[X]  Other:  Interdisciplinary

 

9b)  Please indicate the key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2009. For each issue addressed, please indicate and describe progress made.
“Moderate” progress indicates that issues were discussed thoroughly and projects are in the early stages of planning. “Significant” progress indicates that new policies or programs were implemented, or are in the final stages of planning and approval.

 

 

 

Addressed  

 

Progress 

 

Description

Academics

Examples: minor, major and concentration programs, curricular additions, research projects

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

The Sustainability Studies Minor continues to grow as a program with new additions to the curriculum (more interdepartmental courses reviewed and approved as electives). New curricular offerings include a course in international climate change and energy policy, a course investigating the economic, environmental and social impacts of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, and a public affairs course on sustainability initiatives in international trade of agricultural commodities.

 

Administration

Examples: procurement policies, institution-wide sustainability policy, sustainability-related staff positions

 

[  ]

 

 

Climate

Examples: draft climate action plan, greenhouse gas emissions inventory

 

[X]

 

 

Academics related to implementing the ACUPCC curriculum requirements: New curricular offerings include a course in international climate change and energy policy

Endowment

Examples: proxy voting guidelines, investment advisory committees

 

[  ]

 

 

Energy

Examples: conservation/behavioral change programs, retrofits and efficiency improvements

 

[  ]

 

 

Academics related to energy: New curricular offerings include a course in international climate change and energy policy

Food

Examples: policies to increase purchase of local/sustainably produced foods, implementing campus gardens

 

[  ]

 

 

Green Building

Examples: design or construction policy

 

[  ]

 

 

Student Involvement

Examples:  speaker series, peer-to-peer residential sustainability education programs, student guide to sustainable living on campus

 

[X]

 

Moderate

 

The minor is also now offering an internship course for students interested in hands-on opportunities to put sustainability in to practice in non-profits, businesses/government agencies in the Twin Cities or in operational units on campus (examples:  (green buildings, recycling/composting, stormwater management feature signage etc). Students have led development of an office guide to sustainable living on and around campus is in progress; events offered to student on campus, including a film/speaker event on sustainability in farming, a panel discussion with environmental and public health leaders on clean energy and more.

Transportation

Examples: incentives for use of environmentally-preferable commuting options, campus fleet improvements, connecting students with public transit     

 

[  ]

 

 

Waste Reduction

Examples: recycling, composting, reducing consumption

 

[  ]

 

 

Water

Examples: water conservation, reducing campus pollution, bottled water campaigns

 

[  ]

 

 

Other

 

[X]

 

Moderate

 

Members of the Curriculum Committee with the Institute on the Environment have also in the process of establishing a graduate program.  A graduate student position has been formed to help implement the program.

 

Committee III

 

5c)  Please provide the name of the committee and note the number of meetings held since August 2009.

 

Committee name: University of Minnesota Twin Cities Sustainability Committee and department/operations committees (Bike Committee, Housing and Residential Life Sustainability Committee, Stormwater Linkage Committee and Energy Conservation Operations Team).  Answers below are combined for UMTC and campus operations committees.

Number of meetings: appx 42 - 6 committees and workteams

 

6c)  Please provide the number of stakeholder representatives on the committee.

When providing the data on each stakeholder group, you should provide the total number across all subcommittees (you do not need to numerate individual tallies for subcommittees).

 

 

 

Number of representatives

Administrators

 

2

Faculty

 

19

Staff

 

64

Students

 

8

Other. Please describe.     

 

4 Community/Agency

 

7c)  Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents.

 

 

 

Name      

 

Position

Chair 1    

 

Associate Vice President Facilities Management, Mike Berthelsen

 

Staff

Chair 2

 

Dept Head and Professor, Emily Hoover

 

Faculty

Chair 3

 

 

 

8c)  To whom does the committee report?
[X]  President/Chancellor
[  ]  Vice President/Vice Chancellor
[X]  Other:  The U of MN sustainability efforts related to operations are integrated into departments to ensure sustainability is part of department planning - so they report to department heads and Vice President of University Services.

 

9c)  Please indicate the key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2009. For each issue addressed, please indicate and describe progress made.
“Moderate” progress indicates that issues were discussed thoroughly and projects are in the early stages of planning. “Significant” progress indicates that new policies or programs were implemented, or are in the final stages of planning and approval.

 

 

 

Addressed  

 

Progress  

 

Description

Academics

Examples: minor, major and concentration programs, curricular additions, research projects

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Living laboratory internship projects sponsored through operations departments included evaluating compost streams, developing a sustainability office guide, creating the CPPM sustainability website and others

Administration

Examples: procurement policies, institution-wide sustainability policy, sustainability-related staff positions

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Policy to advance sustainability in purchasing created.   New sustainability coordinator position created; New sustainability coordinator role created in Housing and Residential Life .  Established University of Minnesota Sustainabiity Facebook page.

Climate

Examples: draft climate action plan, greenhouse gas emissions inventory

 

[X]

 

 

Sustainability committee and workteams for the Twin Cities campus formed.  Began to develop a climate action plan by end of the year integrated with overall sustainability goals. Energy reduction programs providing interim measures to reduce carbon footprint.  New Sustainability Coordinator and new student worker positions were just formed to support climate action planning. Staff participated in panel sponsored by Campu Beyond Coal student group and held brown bag forum on Beautiful U Day to encourage dialogue on renewable energy options.  Sustainability Coordinator and Energy Director working with students to gather benchmarking data on low carbon energy options.

Endowment

Examples: proxy voting guidelines, investment advisory committees

 

[  ]

 

 

Energy

Examples: conservation/behavioral change programs, retrofits and efficiency improvements

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Met 2 year goal for 5% energy reduction and reduced CO2 by 25,000 tons ahead of target. Continued the “It All Adds Up” campaign and obtained 10,000 pledges through the campaign from the university community to conserve energy. Students in Energy Efficiency Student Alliance Power Police made over 400 contacts with staff to raise awareness about energy conservation measures during building recommisioning "blitzes." Energy conservation and campaign goals meet ahead of schedule.  Implemented extensive program with public showcase events.  Formed Energy Conservation Operations team to address cross department changes like modifying computer settings, building scheduling and space utilization evaluation, lab hood energy measures etc. to optimize energy efficiency.   Programs are continuing and Energy Team is in the process of setting goals for next year which include new conservation targets and also peak load and steam plant targets.

Food

Examples: policies to increase purchase of local/sustainably produced foods, implementing campus gardens     

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

University Dining Services purchased 1,879 pounds of organic produce in 2009 - and purchases from the student organic farm on campus - Cornercopia,   Added new products to list of fair trade purchased items.  Farmers market is help on campus each week during summer months.

Green Building

Examples: design or construction policy

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

University construction standards were updated to require compliance with State of Minnesota Sustainable Building Guidelines: Buildings, Benchmarks and Beyond (B3)  on all construction projects instead of only bonded buildings.  A sustainability website for CPPM was launched to further communicate the University’s sustainable building efforts and guiding policies.  Obtained LEED Silver certification on TCF Stadium. Constructed new  Science Technology and Student Services building and applying for LEED Gold certification.  Additional building construction follows State of Minnesota B3 Sustainable Building Guidelines, which among other categories, requires energy performance that is 30% better than MN State code. Energy Conservation Operations team developed recommendations for lab hood energy reductio

Student Involvement

Examples:  speaker series, peer-to-peer residential sustainability education programs, student guide to sustainable living on campus

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Implemented in room recycling bins across housing.  Implemented cold water wash only.  Established Sustainability and Residential Life Facebook page.  Implemented composting in residential dining halls with University Dining Services.  Killowatt meter purchased that is available to measure energy usage in rooms. Integrating Sustainability into the Housing and Residential Life (HRL) department objectives.  Sustainability concepts provided as part of interview and general objectives  for 150 Community Advisors (CA) and 15 Associate Resident Directors. Ideas for events and resources and details about sustainability efforts in HRL are provided online to the CAs as a resource.  Volunteer Sustainability Advocates in place in some buildings.  Created Green Buying Guide for internal purchases.

Transportation

Examples: incentives for use of environmentally-preferable commuting options, campus fleet improvements, connecting students with public transit      

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Held courteous/safety bike workshop during welcome week freshmen orientation.  Grants for bike center applied for and approved, bike center planned and construction scheduled to begin in 4th qtr of 2010.   Arranged for 11 Nice Ride bike share kiosks on  East and West Bank as part of City of Minneapolis bike share program.  Expanded Zipcar to 10 veyhicles on campus. Implemented Zimride, a ride-matching social-networking tool for carpooling  – as of 8/17/10, 1560 active Zimride users and 123,425 total trips online! Zimride estimates potential 3676 lbs CO2 saved per user.   Purchased 2 hybrid buses.   Increased numbers of hybrid and E85 vehicles. Initial preparatory construction work for light rail to pass through campus initiated.  A multimodal station is included.  The University is playing a strong role in design planning to help ensure pedestrian and bike friendly campus features are improved.

Waste Reduction

Examples: recycling, composting, reducing consumption

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Launched “It All Adds Up” recycling campaign on Beautiful U Day April, 2010, with a goal of recovering an additional 5% of campus waste for recycling by 2012.  Implemented waste collection event on Beautiful U Day which yielded 6,233 pounds of books, 4,648 pounds of electronics, and 206 cell phones for reuse or recycling.  Provided space in the Reuse Center for community reuse program linked to Move In Move Out.

Water

Examples: water conservation, reducing campus pollution, bottled water campaigns

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Implemented an innovative warewashing system for cleaning dishware, glassware and utensils in fall 2009. The new program reduces energy and water consumption, controls chemical usage and limits packaging waste sent to trash incinerators.  Initiated remodel of dish room in residence hall dining facility.  New dish machine will use 20-30% less chemicals and use 20% less energy for heating the air and water. Using a new ‘easy bottle fill” water fountain on campus.  Sarita wetlands and storm water management area forebay expanded to encourage infiltration on storm water at major St. Paul campus storm water outfall.  Diverse group of stakeholders working to enhance storm water management.  Features in TCF stadium encourage infiltration using bioswales and raingarden retention pond.

Other

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Welcome week integration of sustainability : First year programs are working with U Services and Sustainability staff to focus on communicating sustainability initiatives during Welcome Week - not just by workshops, but by integrating into events - zero waste lunch, getting students on bus and connector, working with sponsors for more "sustainable" give aways.  In 2009 students and staff presented on:  energy and energy conservation pledge tables, bike safety/bike courtesy workshop, living green on campus, info on alternative transportation - Zip Car, ZimRide, U-Pass, dining services composting and recycling and provided student tabling to make connections with student groups as part of the Institute on the Environment Open House.

 

 

OFFICE OR DEPARTMENT                                  


10) Does your school have an office or department exclusively dedicated to furthering sustainability on campus? Please note: this does not include academic programs focused on sustainability.
Please provide the number of staff in the office in terms of full-time equivalent (FTE). FTE for a full-time staff member would be 1, FTE for a half-time staff member would be 0.5.

Yes

 

Please provide details below.

 

Office name:

Year created:

Description: The Office of Vice President, University Services is the home for the Twin Cities campus sustainability program.  Vice President O’Brien is the university officer designated by President Bruininks to be responsible for sustainability efforts across the University.  The approach is to integrate sustainability into department operations.

Number of staff in office (in FTE): 2

 

SUSTAINABILITY STAFF

Please provide your answers to questions 11-12 in terms of full-time equivalent (FTE). For example, FTE for a half-time staff member would be 0.5.

 

11) Does your school employ a sustainability coordinator, director, or manager?

Your response may include faculty/staff who, in addition to their regular responsibilities, are overseeing campus sustainability initiatives (similar to the responsibilities of a full-time sustainability coordinator). For those faculty/staff partially assigned to sustainability work, please indicate time allotted for sustainability efforts in full-time equivalent (FTE).

Yes

 

Please provide details below.

 

Title: Sustainability Director

Department: University Services

Time worked (in FTE): 1

Job description: Works with committees and campus sustainability coordinators to develop a cohesive and organized approach to long and short term goals.

 

12) Please list the titles and a brief job description for all other full- and part-time staff who are engaged in planning, implementing or managingsustainability initiatives on your campus (e.g. Assistant Sustainability Coordinator, Food Services Sustainability Coordinator, Green Office Program Manager).

Your response may include faculty/staff who, in addition to their regular responsibilities, are overseeing campus sustainability initiatives (similar to the responsibilities of a full-time sustainability coordinator). For those faculty/staff partially assigned to sustainability work, please indicate time allotted for sustainability efforts (in FTE).Your response may include graduate assistants.

 

Your response should exclude academic researchers, administrative assistants, technical support staff, and recycling/compost collections staff. Your response should also exclude information about undergraduate student interns and student employees. This information should be provided in the Student Involvement section of the survey (questions 56-61).

 

Title      

 

Department      

 

Time worked (in FTE)      

 

Job description

Sustainability Coordinator

 

University Services

 

1

 

Coordinate, support and advance existing and emerging sustainability programs and initiatives on the Twin Cities campus of the University of Minnesota, with a specific focus on operations and service activities.

Energy Management Staff – Director, Assistant Director, Building Recommissioning Engineer, Engineers

 

Facilities Management

 

9

 

Building recommissiong, energy generation, conservation, and distribution.

Transportation - Bike Program Coordinator, Analyst Parking, Administrative Director Fleet, others

 

Parking and Transportation

 

2

 

Various initiatives and communications

Director of Dining Services, Director of Residential Dining, Marketing Program Manager, Contract Administrator, Executive Chef

 

Dining Services

 

0.7

 

Sustainable food procurement, trayless dining and water conservation, composting, and recycling program management.

Capital Planning and Project Management, - LEED certified personnel, Enterprise efforts to integrate sustainability into master planning (OM’s parttime); working on standards integration

 

Capital Planning

 

1.0

 

Sustainability Coordination, Project Management & Planning

Waste reduction, reuse, and recycling

 

 

6.0

 

Waste reduction and diversion programs.  Anti-idling program for facilities management vehicles through GPS tracking.

Communications Director; Senior EditorStaff, Associate to (Facilities Management)

 

U Services and Facilities Management

 

0.6

 

Purchasing Managers

 

 

0.25

 

Procurement of sustainable products, coordiantion anti-idling program

Printing Services Dept Director

 

 

0.5

 

Develop and manage FSC certification program, recycled paper program

Education Sustainability Coordinator

 

Institute on the Environment

 

1

 

Coordinates the Sustainability Minor and provides a communication point on living laboratory projects between academics  and operations, coordinates with faculty and staff committees on sustainability curriculum development.

Housing and Residential Life Sustainability Committee Chair

 

Housing and Residential Life

 

0.2

 

Coordinates and leads integration of sustainability into the residential life program

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WEBSITE


13) Does your school have a website detailing its sustainability initiatives?

If yes, please provide URL

NEW!!!  http://portal.environment.umn.edu/

 

GREEN PURCHASING


14) Does your school have a formal green purchasing policy?

Yes

 

If yes, please indicate the areas to which your policy pertains, and whether purchase is required or encouraged:

 

 

 

Required      

 

Encouraged      

Appliances

 

[X]

 

[  ]

Cleaning products

 

[  ]

 

[X]

Computers/electronics

 

[X]

 

[  ]

Lighting

 

[X]

 

[  ]

Office supplies

 

[  ]

 

[X]

Paper products

 

[  ]

 

[X]

Reduced packaging for purchases               

 

[  ]

 

[X]

Other. Please describe below.

 

[  ]

 

[  ]


Other description: Minimum requirements on some categories; some categories are not specifically covered by the policy but the practice and expectation is well established. Priority given to certain type products.  Green cleaners are used where one exists for the category of cleaner – new RFP for University wide green cleaning systems is in process.http://purchasing.umn.edu/policy/sustain.html

 

15) Please indicate in which categories you regularly purchase ENERGY STAR qualified products. Check all that apply.  If possible, provide the percentage of products purchased that are ENERGY STAR qualified for each category.

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage purchased  

 

Description

[X]

 

Appliances

 

 

[X]

 

Building products

 

 

[X]

 

Computers/electronics     

 

 

[X]

 

Heating and cooling

 

 

[X]

 

Lighting and fans

 

 

[X]

 

Plumbing

 

 

 

Additional comments: University purchasing is decentralized and ongoing tracking is not established in a way to provide overall percentages.For University Services operations, Energy Star or other energy efficient /sustainability feature product is chosen where a product exists.  Housing and Residential Life has made purchasing choices based upon sustainable features for building materials (carpet, furniture), paper products (recycled content), LED lighting, cleaners, washing machines.

 

16)  Does your school purchase environmentally preferable paper products (e.g., 100 percent post-consumer recycled content, certified by the Forest Stewardship Council)?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

For each of the items below, please indicate the percentage of purchases that contain post-consumer recycled content, are chlorine-free processed, and/or are Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified. Please provide approximate data, to the best of your ability, if your institution uses a decentralized purchasing structure.

               

 

 

Percentage
post-consumer
recycled content     

 

Percentage
Forest Stewardship
Council certified   

 

Percentage
chlorine-free
 processed     

 

Description

Envelopes

 

 

 

 

Facial tissues

 

 

 

 

Napkins

 

 

 

 

Notepads

 

 

 

 

Office paper

 

 

 

 

Paper towels

 

 

 

 

Other. Please describe.

 

 

 

 

 

Additional comments: Our purchases of environmentally preferable print and copy paper included: 33,500 reams of 100% Post-Consumer Waste Copy Paper (FSC certified fiber, certified EcoLogo, processed chlorine free, manufactured using biogas energy); 128,000 reams of 30% post-consumer waste copy paper (Sustainable Forestry Initiative certified fiber sourcing); and 98,000 reams of virgin copy paper (Sustainable Forestry Initiative fiber sourcing).Last year the following custodial paper items were purchased, all of which met the EPA guidelines for Recycled content: Brown Towels, 5300 Cases (EcoLogo certified); C-Fold towels, 3400 Cases (EcoLogo certified) Roll Towels, 4100 Cases (EcoLogo certified); and Toilet Paper, 4405 Cases.

 

17)  Does your school purchase computers or electronics that are Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) certified?

Yes

 

If yes, please describe below.

Please indicate the portion of computer or electronics purchases that are EPEAT certified. Please provide the percentage of each product purchased that is EPEAT certified, where data are available. Note which products have been purchased in the “Product description” column (e.g., desktop computers, laptops).

 

 

 

Portion
EPEAT certified      

 

Percentage
EPEAT certified      

 

Product description (e.g. computers, printers)

Product 1

 

All

 

 

Desk top computers and laptops/notebooks.  Must be EPEAT bronze or higher.

Product 2

 

All

 

 

Computer monitors.  Must be EPEAT bronze or higher.

Product 3

 

 

 

 

FUNDING MECHANISMS

 

18)  What mechanisms does your school use to fund sustainability projects on campus? Check and describe all that apply. If no specific mechanisms are in place, indicate as such and move on to question 19.

Data collected for this question is for informational purposes only and will not be evaluated for grading.

 

[  ]  No specific mechanisms are in place.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[  ]

 

Alumni green fund

 

[X]

 

Capital budget

 

All new construction and major renovations (e.g. 10,000 square feet or larger renovation; replacement of the mechanical, ventilation, or cooling system of the building or a section of the building) have to meet State of Minnesota Sustainable Building Guidelines: Buildings, Benchmarks and Beyond (B3) construction standards.

[X]

 

Endowment investment in on-campus sustainability projects    

 

Energy Efficiency projects; planning is underway for sustainable campus academic program in College of Design

[X]

 

Operating budget

 

Departments incorporate sustainability projects into department budget for operational project

[X]

 

Revolving loan fund for sustainability projects

 

Some energy cost savings are reinvested in sustainability and energy conservation projects

[  ]

 

Student green fee

 

[X]    

 

Other. Please describe.

 

Academic department supported student project grant program for campus “greening” projects - piloted in late 2009/2010

 

EMPLOYEE OUTREACH OPPORTUNITIES

19) What programs does your school facilitate that encourage sustainable behavioral change among departments, offices, faculty and staff? Check all that apply.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[X]

 

Departmental sustainability liaisons

 

Departments  around campus have set up green teams to incorporate green practices.

[  ]

 

Green office certification program

 

[X]

 

Green office tips posted online or on staff bulletin boards

 

An office green guide was developed by students for use on campus.

[X]

 

Incorporation of sustainability issues into new employee orientation

 

Pledge on energy conservation was set up at events and orientation along with additional information at building showcase events.

[X]

 

Other

 

The “It All Adds Up” campaign encourages employees and students to sign a pledge to conserve energy.


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CLIMATE CHANGE & ENERGY

 

Please note: Unless otherwise indicated, when providing data about greenhouse gas emissions levels, please provide data based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions. Scope 1 emissions refer to GHG emissions directly resulting from sources owned or operated by the institution (e.g. on-campus combustion of fossil fuels, emissions from campus vehicles). Scope 2 emissions refer to emissions generated indirectly due to the production of electricity that the institution consumes. Scope 3 emissions refer to all other indirect emissions that result from activities of the institution (e.g. employee travel).

 

GREENHOUSE GAS INVENTORY


20)Has your school completed a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventory?Please check all that apply.

The year the inventory was started (rather than ended) should be the year of the inventory. For example, if you began an inventory in June 2008, this would be your 2008 inventory.

[  ]  No
[]In progress. Please describe status and provide estimated completion date:

[X]  Yes.  Please provide total annual GHG emissions (Scopes 1 & 2, as well as scopes 1, 2 & 3 in metric tons of CO2e). Include the start date for each year as well as the URL to each inventory, if available online, or attach the document.

 

 

Start Date         

 

Emissions level

(Scopes 1 & 2)

 

Emissions level

(Scopes 1, 2 & 3)

 

URL          

 

Notes

2009

 

 

539,526

 

 

 

energy only

2008

 

 

544,696/542,365

 

642,737

 

http://acupcc.aashe.org/ghg/620/

 

Include refrigerants, fleet/energy only

2007

 

 

543,785

 

 

 

energy only

2006

 

 

545,205

 

 

 

energy only

2005

 

 

550,884

 

 

 

energy only

 

UploadedCO2 Emissions Trend - 2009_7_30_10-1chart.xls - 98 KB

 

COMMITMENT TO GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTION

 

21) Has your school made a commitment to reduce GHG emissions a specific amount by a target year?

The commitment should be to reducing actual campus greenhouse gas emissions, and does not include offsets or renewable energy credits (purchase of RECs is addressed in question 31). For example, if the university is committed to reaching carbon neutrality by 2030, and aims to do so by reducing campus emissions by 50 percent and buying offsets for the remaining 50 percent, you would indicate “50%” as the reduction level.

Yes


If yes, please list details below.

 

Reduction level (percentage): 6%

Baseline year: 1998-2001

Baseline emissions level: 567,922

Target year: 2010

 

Additional comments: There are actually two commitments.  The U of Mn is participating in Chicago Climate Exchange which requires overall reductions.  We also have a commitment to reduce energy use through Energy Conservation and Energy Efficiency projects which are shorter term target goals and achieving incremental reductions - 5% energy reduction and 25,000 tons CO2 from 2008 to 2010.  This goal was met earlier this year.  A new energy reduction goal is being set.

 

REALIZED GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS

22) Has your school achieved a reduction in GHG emissions? Answer should be based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions.

Please indicate whether your school has achieved actual reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. This does not include the purchase of carbon offsets or renewable energy credits. (Purchase of RECs is considered in question 31.)

Yes


If yes, please list details below.

 

Percentage reduced: 4%

Baseline year: 1998

Baseline emissions level: 567,922

Year achieved: 2009

 

Additional comments: The University of Minnesota Twin Cities Campus Steam Generation met reduction requirements of Chicago Climate Exchange (4% reduction by 2006 from 1998-2001 average baseline and has already met the 6% reduction for 2010 for Steam Generation on campus - Scope 1 emissions).  High energy use research building space increased significantly, by 18%, since 1998.  Extensive energy efficiency measures and changes in operations kept overall campus CO2 emissions from increasing even thought square footage increased by 10%. The overall decrease since 1998 is approximately 4%.

 

23) Please provide GHG emissions figures in terms of gross square feet on campus for the past four years. Answers should be based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions.
Per-gross-square-foot emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total maintained building space

 

The year the inventory was started (rather than ended) should be the year of the inventory. For example, if you began an inventory in June 2008, this would be your 2008 inventory.

 

 

 

2009:

 

22.9 Metric Tons/1000 GSF

2008:

 

23.8

2007:

 

23.2

2006:

 

23.3

2005:

 

24.9


24) Please provide GHG emissions figures per full-time student equivalent for the past four years. Answers should be based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions.

Per full-time student equivalent emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total number of full-time equivalent students.

 

The year the inventory was started (rather than ended) should be the year of the inventory. For example, if you began an inventory in June 2008, this would be your 2008 inventory.

 

 

 

2009:

 

14.2

2008:

 

14.9

2007:

 

14.9

2006:

 

15.1

2005:

 

15.3

 

ENERGY EFFICIENCY                                                 

 

25) Has your school achieved a reduction in building energy consumption compared to a 2005 baseline?

Yes


If yes, please list details below.

Data must be provided in terms of MBtus (one thousand British thermal units) .

2005 baseline year
Building energy consumption:
4,284,389,000        
Gross square feet of building space: 21,732,129

Performance year (most recent year for which data are available)

Building energy consumption : 3,913,919,000

Gross square feet of building space : 22,219,926

26) Please indicate which programs or technologies your school has implemented to improve energy efficiency since 2000. Check all that apply.
[X]    Cogeneration

[X]    Temperature setbacks

[X]    Steam trap systems

 

For the following technologies and programs, please indicate the percentage of possible campus building space in which they have been implemented.

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of building space

[  ]

 

Back pressure turbines

 

[X]

 

Economizers

 

75

[X]

 

Energy management system; building automation system, energy information system, or monitoring-based commissioning (MBCx) system

 

100

[  ]

 

Gas-fired hydronic heating systems

 

[X]

 

Heat recovery systems

 

25

[X]

 

LED lighting

 

5

[X]

 

Lighting sensors

 

25

[X]

 

Metering—chilled water

 

75

[X]

 

Metering—electric

 

100

[X]

 

Metering—steam

 

100

[X]

 

Other energy-efficient lighting (e.g. T5 or T8)

 

95

[X]

 

Performing system tune-ups

 

15

[X]

 

Retrocommissioning of HVAC systems (buildings must have been commissioned, retrocommissioned or re-commissioned within the last 10 years)

 

15

[  ]

 

Steam turbines

 

[  ]

 

Steam-line insulation

 

[X]

 

Timers for temperature control

 

80

[X]

 

Variable speed drives

 

75

[X]

 

Vending machine sensors

 

100

[X]

 

Other. Please describe below.

 

 .

 

Description: U of M controls engineers have developed an automated fan schedule variance reporting system which compares weekly fan operational hours to optimum scheduled hours and alerts the facilities staff to inconsistencies.     The system has enabled operators to detect and eliminate situations where HVAC systems are not responding to schedules or to schedules which have been altered from optimum, reducing energy consumption in either case. Rather than just using occupancy sensors to control lighting, widespread use of occupancy sensors to control HVAC (VAV box control) is being leveraged wherever possible.In buildings where zone-wise VAV control is possible, VAV boxes are being scheduled based on occupancy of each zone or room.Reducing ventilation rates in laboratories during unoccupied hours while providing occupancy sensors to increase ventilation should the lab become occupied during unscheduled hours has been piloted in several research labs and proven to be a successful, energy saving tactic.The University has established a goal to recommission 40 buildings in fiscal year 2010.   Our experience in the previous year’s recommissioning efforts indicate building energy consumption can typically be reduced 10-20% as a result of the University’s recommissioning protocol.  The University is an active participant in Xcel Energy’s recommissioning rebate program, all recommissioning studies submitted to the utility have been approved and rebates have been awarded.  Examples of last year’s recommissioning success stories include:Vincent HallVincent Hall consumes approximately $131,070 in energy (steam and electric) per year.  The Re-Commissioning Team identified 24 Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECOs) which  reduced the building’s overall energy consumption by 47% annually for a cost savings of approximately $61,000. The investment required to implement these measures was approximately $57,000.  These measures improved mechanical and lighting system efficiency and reduced operational costs without sacrificing building occupants’ comfort or safety. The four most significant ECO’s involved improving efficiency of the building’s four large Air Handling Units (AHU).  These constant volume, multi-zone AHUs operate 24 hours per day, 365 days per year.   The AHU discharge air set points were found to be fixed at 55°F year round which necessitated the constant operation of eight steam re-heat coils for each air handler.  All of the air handlers in the building were controlled by out-dated pneumatic control systems which did not allow for the implementation of more energy efficient control strategies.   The AHU related ECOs involved installing modern controls, scheduling operation, installation of a damper, interlocking exhaust fans with supply fans and adding thermostatic control to the mechanical room exhaust fan. Donhowe BuildingThe Donhowe Building consumes approximately $138,000 worth of energy (steam & electric) per year. The Re-commissioning Team identified 22 Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECOs) which reduced energy consumption by 21% or $29,000 annually.  The cost to implement these measures was less than $30,000.  Nine of the ECO’s identified are simple programming changes to existing mechanical equipment control systems.  The three larger ECO’s reduced over-designed air flows throughout the building resulting in lower fan and chiller electrical consumption as well as lower steam consumption.


27) What programs does your school facilitate that encourage members of the campus community to reduce energy use? Check all that apply.

[X]

 

Audits or investigations of individual energy use 

[X]

 

Cash incentives for energy reductions among departments

[X]

 

Energy monitoring website or dashboard displays for buildings

[  ]

 

Energy reduction competitions among departments and/or offices

[X]

 

Fume hoods in science buildings

[X]

 

Green IT policies (e.g. enabling power management)

[X]

 

PR campaigns (increased/innovative signage, newsletters, slogans, saturation), demonstrations to raise awareness, pledge drives    

[X]

 

Trade-in or rebate programs for inefficient appliances (e.g. CFLs, refrigerators)

[X]

 

Other. Please describe: Worked with student groups to form a team called the Power Police, which installs timers and power strips in University offices and educations the campus community about energy use.

 

RENEWABLE ENERGY GENERATION

 

28) Does your school generate renewable energy?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

Please check all types of renewable energy that are generated, and provide data on the percentage of your total energy consumption fulfilled by each renewable source listed. If less than one percent is fulfilled by a given source, leave percent box blank. For each type of renewable energy, please describe the production source.

 

 

 

Renewable
energy type

 

Percent of
total energy
consumption    

 

Production
source description

[X]

 

Biomass

 

3

 

Oat hulls are burned in campus steam plant.

[  ]

 

Concentrated solar power

 

 

[  ]

 

Geothermal (shallow depth)

 

 

[  ]

 

Low-impact hydropower

 

 

[X]

 

Photovoltaics

 

<3

 

Small photovoltaic array used for research on Rapson Hall, College of Design.

[  ]

 

Wind

 

 

[  ]

 

Other. Please specify below.    

 

 

 

Other description:


29) Does your school have solar hot water systems?

No

 

If yes, please specify number of systems and total MBtus generated annually, if available.

 

Number of systems:

Total MBtus generated annually:

 

RENEWABLE ENERGY PURCHASE

 

30) What is the fuel mix of electricity purchased from the grid for your campus? Please provide the percentage for each source.

If less than one percent of a source is purchased, leave the percent box blank.

 

Energy source

 

Percent of total energy purchase

Coal

 

39

Natural Gas

 

21

Nuclear

 

26

Petroleum

 

Renewables (biomass, solar, wind, low-impact hydropower, photovoltaics, geothermal)      

 

14

Other. Please specify:

 



Percentage of overall electricity consumption purchased from the grid: Est 95% - 100%, up to 5% through co-generation on campus.


31) Has your school purchased electric energy from renewable sources or renewable energy credits (RECs)?
RECs and electricity from renewable sources must be Green-e Certified or meet the requirements of the Green-e standards .

No

 

If yes, please describe below.

Date of most recent purchase:
Length of contract:
Average annual quantity (kWh):
Average percentage of your total annual electric energy use that it represents:

 

ON-SITE COMBUSTION

 

32) Please provide total MBtus of energy for heating and cooling generated annually from on-site combustion:

2,626,789

 

33) Please list each fuel source used in on-site combustion for heating and cooling, and note the percentage of overall BTUs derived from that source:
If less than one percent of a source is purchased, leave the percent box blank.

 

Energy Source    

 

Percent of overall BTUs   

Biomass

 

3.36

Coal

 

24.8

Geothermal

 

Natural gas

 

69.69

Petroleum

 

2.2

Other. Please specify:

 



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FOOD & RECYCLING

Please note: The food portion of this category and information about waste reduction in dining services is covered in a separate dining survey .

 

WASTE REDUCTION

 

34) Please provide the following information pertaining to trends in waste generation per weighted campus user.

2005 baseline year

Weighted campus users: 54,394
Total waste generated (garbage + recycling + compost): 8,544 tons

Performance year (most recent year for which data are available)
Weighted campus users:
55,843
Total waste generated (garbage + recycling + compost): 8,712 tons

 

RECYCLING OF TRADITIONAL MATERIALS

 

35) Please indicate which traditional materials your institution recycles. Check all that apply.

[  ]

 

None

[X]

 

Aluminum

[X]

 

Cardboard

[X]

 

Glass

[X]

 

Paper

[  ]

 

Plastics (all)

[X]

 

Plastics (some)

[X]

 

Other. Please list: Books, tin cans, LDPE film, polypropylene packaging materials, sterile blue wrap

 

36) Please indicate the campus-wide diversion rate of recyclable waste from traditional disposal.

The diversion rate should be calculated based on the diversion of traditional recyclables (paper, plastics, aluminum, cardboard, glass). Please do not include recycled electronic waste, recycled construction waste, or composted food and landscaping waste in the calculation of this figure.

The diversion rate is equal to the (total amount of traditional recycled materials) divided by the (total amount of landfill waste plus the total amount of traditional recycled materials).

40%

 

RECYCLING OF ELECTRONIC WASTE


37) Does your institution have an electronics recycling program?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

Please indicate recycling of the following items is available for students (through receptacles on campus, recycling drives, or other means), and/or for institutional electronics waste. Check all that apply.

 

 

 

For waste generated by students  

 

For waste generated by the institution

Batteries

 

[X]

 

[X]

Cell phones

 

[X]

 

[X]

Computers

 

[X]

 

[X]

Light bulbs

 

[X]

 

[X]

Printer cartridges

 

[X]

 

[X]

Other E-waste. Please list items:

 

[X]

 

[X]

Accept all types of electronics that contain circuit boards or CRTs, including  audio/video equipment, lab and office equipment and small hand held devices.

If possible, describe the organization and/or company you are using to collect your e-waste for recycling, and the environmental and social safeguards that they take in disposal:

Asset Recovery Corporation is one of the original recyclers to sign the Electronic Recycler's Pledge of True Stewardship, also called the e-Stewards Pledge program. Pledged e-Stewards recyclers meet the requirements of keeping toxic e-waste out of developing countries, prisons, landfills and incinerators. Furthermore, we are establishing an ISO 14001 environmental management system in conformity with the new e-Stewards Standard for the Recycling and Reuse of Electronic Waste®.  http://www.assetrecoverycorp.com/quality/index.html

 

COMPOSTING (APART FROM DINING FACILITIES)


38) What percentage of your campus's landscaping waste is composted or mulched?

99%


39) Do you provide composting receptacles around campus in locations other than dining halls (e.g., in residence halls, offices, academic buildings)?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

[X]  

 

Academic buildings

[X]  

 

Offices

[X]  

 

Outdoors

[X]  

 

Residence halls

 

Description:

We are beginning to add organics collection in all buildings on campus.  Currently 7 Buildings have full organics collection including the collection of bathroom paper towels: One Conference Center, 4 Offices/Academic Buildings, and 2 Lab Buildings with 4 other buildings having just custodial collection of bathroom paper towels.   Additional buildings are currently being implemented or piloted.

 

SOURCE REDUCTION


40) Does your campus run any source-reduction initiatives (e.g., end-of-semester furniture or clothing swaps and collections)?

Yes

 

If yes, please check and describe all of the programs below that are in place at your institution:

 

 

 

 

Description

[X]  

 

Limited printing

 

Double sided printing implemented as the standard in many units.  Students pay by the page for printing in University buildings.

[X]  

 

Move-in waste reduction

 

Housing and Residential Life has programs to increase recycling awareness during Move-In and Move-Out. Guidelines are provided for types of products to bring to campus. http://www.housing.umn.edu/sustainability/

[X]  

 

Move-out waste reduction

 

Housing and Residential Life has programs to increase recycling awareness during Move-In and Move-Out. The Facilities Management Reuse Center partnered with a neighborhood group this last year to collect furniture, electronics, and other items for reuse in order to reduce waste from students vacating off-campus housing in the neighborhoods immediately adjacent to campus. Products will be available to the community during Move IN also.  http://facm.oit.umn.edu/news/features/2010/USERVICES_CONTENT_211736.html

[X]  

 

Year-round materials exchange programs     

 

The Reuse Center collects furniture and other items from University departments for resale to internal departments and members of the community.

[X]  

 

Other

 

Reduce Reuse Recycle Initiative started as second phase of “It All Adds Up” campaign.   (First phase was energy reduction)  Through the initiative the University has committed to recovering an additional five percent (450 tons) of campus waste for recycling by the end of 2012. Such an increase would prevent nearly 900 tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere and save more than $50,000 annually.  http://www1.umn.edu/italladdsup/index.php Implemented waste collection event on Beautiful U Day (April 2010) which yielded 6,233 pounds of books, 4,648 pounds of electronics, and 206 cell phones for reuse or recycling.


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GREEN BUILDING

 

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION


41) Does your school have a formal green building policy pertaining to design and construction for new buildings and major renovations?

Yes

 

If yes, please describe policy and provide URL to the full policy, if available:

The University of Minnesota follows the State of Minnesota Sustainable Building Guidelines: Buildings, Benchmarks and Beyond (B3) for all new building construction and major renovation.  A major renovation is considered 10,000 square feet or larger and includes the replacement of the mechanical, ventilation, or cooling system of the building or a section of the building.  The Center for Sustainable Building Research at the University was a prime author of the BE Sustainable Building Guidelines.  B3 is a performance-based sustainable building system, comparable to LEED but is more specific to the climate of Minnesota.  MN B3 includes focus in areas of Performance Management, Site & Water, Energy & Atmosphere, Indoor Environment and Materials & Waste.  Meeting the minimum requirements of B3 is at least equivalent to a level of LEED Certified (frequently Silver) and achieving the maximum credits of B3 is at least equivalent to a level of LEED Platinum.    More on B3 can be found on the web at: http://www.msbg.umn.edu/index.html.Additionally, the University is beginning to roll out a major revision of its Design and Construction Building Standards.  The new standards will require B3 to be followed on all projects, regardless of square footage. The current University Design and Construction Standards are located on the web at http://www.cppm.umn.edu/standards.html.  The revised Standards will be located at the same web address.


42) Please provide the following information about LEED-certified buildings on your campus:

Total number of LEED-certified buildings:1

 

 

 

Combined gross square footage:      

 

Building name(s):

Certified-level   

 

 

Silver-level

 

900000

 

TCF Stadium

Gold-level

 

 

STSS in process applying for Gold

Platinum-level   

 

 

 

43) Please provide information about campus buildings that meet LEED certification criteria, but are not certified.

Total number of buildings that meet LEED criteria:3

 

 

 

Combined gross square footage:    

 

Building name(s):

Certified-level criteria met, but not certified

 

68000

 

Biosciences - B3 described above.  These standards are performance standards similar to LEED but specific to the state of MN - See link in question 41

Silver-level criteria met, but not certified

 

130000

 

Carlson  - B3 described above.  These standards are performance standards similar to LEED but specific to the state of MN - See link in question 41

Gold-level criteria met, but not certified

 

115000

 

STSS is in process of applying for Gold LEED

Platinum-level criteria met, but not certified   

 

 

 

44) Please provide information about buildings that are ENERGY STAR labeled.

Total number of ENERGY STAR buildings:

Combined gross square footage:
Building names:

 

45) Please provide information about buildings on your campus that meet the standards of other third-party green building certifications (e.g. Green Globes).

Certification type:

Total number of buildings:

Combined gross square footage: 

Building names:

 

46) For the 2009-2010 academic year, what percentage of your institution's non-hazardous construction and demolition waste was diverted from landfills?

60%

 

ADAPTIVE REUSE

 

47) Please provide information about adaptive reuse projects your campus has completed since the year 2000.

Total number of adaptive reuse projects completed since the year 2000:   5


Please provide additional details for up to ten of the most comprehensive projects:

 

Project name     

 

Square footage  

 

Former use       

 

Current use      

 

Additional details

Education Sciences Building

 

62,000

 

Minerals research lab

 

Offices for education and human development

 

Built 1922, Renovated 2007

Nicholson Hall

 

73,000

 

Offices and classrooms

 

Offices and classrooms

 

Built 1890, Renovated 2005

Folwell Hall

 

113,000

 

Offices and classrooms

 

Offices and classrooms

 

Built 1901, Renovation to be complete 2011

Pomeroy Center

 

7,000

 

Dairy Barn

 

Alumni and student learning center

 

Built 1907, Renovated 2008

Walter Library

 

237,000

 

Library

 

Digital media center

 

Built 1922, Renovated 2001

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


48) Please provide the student enrollment and gross square footage of buildings on campus in the 2000-2001 academic year.

 

Student enrollment (FTE): 37,961

Square footage: 19,898,066

 

49) Please provide the student enrollment and gross square footage of buildings on campus for the 2009-2010 academic year.

 

Student enrollment (FTE): 44877 FTE; 51,716 student enrollment

Square footage: 22,219,926

 

OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE


50) Does your school have a formal green building policy specifically pertaining to operations and maintenance?

Yes

 

If yes, please describe policy and provide URL to the full policy, if available:

The Board of Regents Sustainability and Energy Efficiency policy is the foundation for sustainable maintenance and operations.http://www1.umn.edu/regents/policies/administrative/Sustain_Energy_Efficiency.pdf The Environmental Management Administrative Policy provides additional guidance. http://www.policy.umn.edu/Policies/Operations/Safety/ENVIRONMENT.htmlThere is also a waste abatement program mission and visionhttp://www1.umn.edu/recycle/missionstatement.htmland policy/standards


51) Please provide the following information about LEED-EB certified buildings on your campus:

Total number of LEED-EB certified buildings:
Combined gross square footage:
Building names:

 

52) Please provide the following information about buildings that meet LEED-EB certification criteria but are not certified:

Total number of buildings that meet LEED-EB criteria but are not certified: Not Known  - has not been evaluated
Combined gross square footage:
Building names:

 

WATER MANAGEMENT

 

53) Has your institution reduced its water consumption per weighted campus user, as compared to a 2005 baseline?
Weighted campus users = (1 * number of on-campus residents) + (0.75 * number of non-residential or commuter full-time students, faculty and staff members) + (0.5 * number of non-residential or commuter part-time students, faculty, and staff members) .

Yes

 

If yes, please provide the following information:

2005 baseline year
Weighted campus users:
54,394
Water consumed (gallons): 768,647,044

Performance year (most recent year for which data are available)
Weighted campus users:
55,843
Water consumed (gallons): 773,452,944

 

54) Please indicate which of the following water-conservation technologies have been installed in existing buildings on campus. Check all that apply. For each item, please indicate the percentage of possible campus building space in which the technology has been installed.

For example, if dual-flush toilets have been installed in all bathrooms on campus, you would indicate “100” as the percentage of building space in which the technology has been installed.

 

 

 

 

Percentage of building space     

[X]  

 

Building water metering

 

[  ]  

 

Dual-flush toilets

 

[  ]  

 

Gray water systems

 

[X]  

 

Laundry technology

 

[  ]  

 

Leak detection and reduction  

 

[X]  

 

Low-flow faucets

 

[X]  

 

Low-flow showerheads

 

[  ]  

 

Non-potable water usage

 

[X]  

 

Waterless urinals

 

[X]  

 

Xeriscaping

 

N/A

[X]  

 

Weather-informed irrigation

 

N/A

[  ]  

 

Other. Please describe below.  

 

 

Other description:

 

55) What stormwater management technologies or strategies are used on your campus?

[X]

 

Living or vegetated roofs  

[X]

 

Porous pavement

[X]

 

Retention ponds

[X]

 

Stone swales

[X]

 

Vegetated swales

[X]

 

Other. Please describe: Grit chambers, underground retention systems, media filtration, natural wetland

 

ENERGY MANAGEMENT

Information concerning energy management will be drawn from question 26 (Climate Change & Energy) . If you wish to provide any additional information about energy-efficiency technologies installed in campus buildings, please attach it in a supplemental document at the end of the survey.


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STUDENT INVOLVEMENT

 

RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITIES

 

56) Please list sustainability-themed residential communities or housing options at your school.

 A sustainability-themed residential community is created specifically to provide students with a living-and-learning experience focused on sustainability.  Students must have actively selected or applied to live in the residence. Example: Synergy House at Colorado College .

 

For each sustainability-themed residential community, please provide the following information:

 

Name of program     

 

Type of community     

 

Number of students involved     

 

Additional details

Sustainability Initiatives

 

Building

 

All halls

 

Housing & Residential Life instituted its own sustainability committee in 2007 with the mission to foster sustainability awareness in our living and learning communities. The Committee works closely with resident student groups to institute sustainability initiatives such as: in-room recycling, energy and water conservation as well as recycling awareness during move-in and move out.

In room recycling bins

 

Building

 

All on campus = 5000 appx

 

Recycling bins that are color coded like the campus recycling program system are in each room

Environment House Living &  Learning Community

 

Hallway

 

appx 30/year

 

Environment House is a Living Learning Community for any incoming first-year student interested in sustainability and the health and well-being of our natural world. Participants may include students from any major or college, with priority given to incoming freshmen pursuing degrees in the College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences.

Healthy Foods, Healthy Lives House

 

House

 

 

Residents of the HF, HL house play an integral role in the development and outcomes of its programs and planning. In result, additional programming is possible based on the interests of the particular group (such as fitness, vegan cooking, community service, etc). These experiences may lead to future leadership opportunities on and off campus.

 

 

 

 

NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION


57) Does a portion of your new student orientation specifically cover sustainability?

Yes

 

If yes, please check and describe all ways in which sustainability is incorporated into new student orientation:

[X]  

 

Skits, speakers, or presentations that take place in large venues that most or all first-year students attend. Topics must include at least one of the following: promoting the Office of Sustainability, student campus sustainability groups, or sustainability as an important campus issue.

[X]  

 

Incorporating sustainability information into presentations made by RAs to individual hallways.

[X]  

 

Active engagement of students in activities that raise awareness about sustainability, highlight how sustainability occurs on campus, or in which students take part in a productive activity, such as volunteer work or projects (e.g., working in the on-campus garden).

[X]  

 

Making orientation more sustainable through efforts such as a zero-waste meal or carbon offsets.

[X]  

 

Other. Please describe:

Presentations: Staff and students are involved in various workshops, tabling events and talks about various sustainability programs on campus.   RAs:  The residence halls leaders receive orientation on sustainability along with over 400 welcome week leaders.  Sustainability is incorporated along with other topics like Diversity, etc.  into resources provided to RAs. A checklist of ideas is provided about choices and projects.  Active engagement: Students lead and volunteer to coordinate sustainability oriented talks ( “living green on campus” and “biking on campus”), educating about compost and recycling program and just providing info about ways to get involved in sustainability efforts on campus. Last year Welcome Week leaders all wore the “It All Adds Up “ energy conservation campaign t-shirts and many took the lead to take the campus energy conservation pledge. Sustainable events: Zero waste meals are served during welcome week.  Also an effort has been made to reduce “throwaway giveaways”.   The events are scheduled across our three UMTC campuses students ride the bus and connector during the week many for the first time - getting over that initial hurdle of using public transportation. Other: Sustainability topics are also intertwined in the community engagement portion of the orientation - this is an important aspect of the urban campus especially as students move off campus in the following years.   An open house with our Institute on the Environment is part of the getting to know the University Day which helps show how the university research is linking to issues that are important on campus, locally and globally (energy, food, transportation etc) students participate in the event to also connect new students to various student groups focused on environmental and sustainability).  Another event in 2009 welcome week was focused on raising awareness about the Mississippi River that runs through our campus.   The discussion helped make the connection between the stormwater management /sewers on campus and the impact to the river. It also raised awareness about natural resources.  The boat ride included the Park Service,  River Life Educators and Sustainability staff and others.  A Gopher Rangers student group was formed to focus "student power" on the river beyond welcome week.

 

INTERNSHIPS/OUTREACH OPPORTUNITIES


58) Does your school offer on-campus, office-based sustainability internships or jobs for students during the academic year?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide the number of students and average number of hours worked weekly per student below.

 

 

 

Number of students:     

 

Average hours worked weekly per student:    

Paid positions

 

36  Note number may fluctuate during year.  For example, in Fall -  15 Food Dudes  and 3 Green Team members in Dining communicate and help new students re:composting and other food programs.  Not all of those jobs are year round.

 

10 - 15

Unpaid positions

 

12

 


59) Does your school have residence hall Eco-Reps or a similar program to promote behavioral change on campus?

 

If yes, please provide the URL to the program's website. If not, select “no.”

Until now the Sustainability Advocates have been a self-directed, volunteer effort.  However the staff are creating a more formal program now and the goal is to recruit 10 Sustainability Advocates (aka Eco-Reps) - one for each building.

 

Please provide the following details about the number of students involved in program, their average working hours, and any compensation that they receive.

 

 

 

Number of students:     

 

Average hours worked weekly per student:

Paid positions.

 

Sustainability Education Coordinator - Housing Residental Life

 

10-15

Positions that award academic credit.  

 

 

Uncompensated positions.

 

5 - 10

 

 

SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGES AND COMPETITIONS

 

60) Does your school organize any sustainability challenges/competitions for your campus and/or with other colleges?

Yes, three or more competitions.

 

For each competition or challenge that is run on campus, please provide the details requested. You may provide detailed information for up to three competitions.

 

First Competition:

 

Competition Overview

 

Competition Name: It All Adds Up

Year Initiated: 2009

Website: http://www1.umn.edu/italladdsup/index.php

 

Frequency that competition is run: Ongoing

 

Groups involved in coordinating the competition:

[X]

 

Students

[  ]

 

Faculty

[X]

 

Staff

[  ]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, please describe.  

 

Participants in the competition:

[X]

 

Students

[X]

 

Faculty

[X]

 

Staff

[X]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, please describe:  

 

Incentives for participation:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Cash

 

[X]  

 

Non-monetary prizes  

 

ipod giveaway, shirts, shopping bags, other items

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

Goals of competition:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[X]  

 

Energy conservation  

 

[X]  

 

Waste reduction

 

[  ]

 

Water conservation  

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

Percent of energy and/or resource use reduction resulting from the competition: 5% energy reduction, 10,000 pledges: The University of Minnesota, Twin Cities has reduced its energy consumption by five percent, saving the university more than $2.25 million annually and resulting in 25,000 fewer tons of CO2 being released into the atmosphere. It All Adds Up set a five percent energy reduction goal for fiscal year 2010 and reached it in March -- three months early.In 2010 on Beautiful U Day, President Bruininks and the U of M committed to recovering an additional five percent (450 tons) of campus waste for recycling by the end of 2012.

Lasting effects of competition: The awareness-raising aspect of the IAAU campaign is continuing. Awareness about energy use but also awareness about the work of the energy department. The focus on individual contribution will help in the future as tougher adjustments are needed.  The campaign provides a forum for having a broad conversation about our overall Sustainability goals.  The success of the energy reduction effort aso led to the new waste reduction goal.  Both activist and technical student groups joined together in a student alliance that helped get the word out to building occupants and that effort continues.  This partnership to play a role in addressing energy issues at the U brought together groups that might normally not come into contact with each other. The effort helped many of those students see how the impact reducing energy can have when you are a large research university.  The 5% reduced is twice the carbon footprint of some small campuses.

Additional Information: Power Police/Energty Efficiency Student Alliance:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EmSLm5BhhjU

 

Second Competition:

 

Competition Overview

 

Competition Name: Recyclemania

Year Initiated: 2002

Website:

 

Frequency that competition is run: Once annually

 

Groups involved in coordinating the competition:

[X]

 

Students

 

[  ]

 

Faculty

 

[X]

 

Staff

 

[  ]

 

Administrators

 

[  ]

 

Other, please describe.  

 

 

Participants in the competition:

[X]

 

Students

[X]

 

Faculty

[X]

 

Staff

[X]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, describe:  

 

Incentives for participation:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Cash

 

[  ]  

 

Non-monetary prizes  

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

Goals of competition:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Energy conservation

 

[X]  

 

Waste reduction

 

[  ]  

 

Water conservation  

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 


Percent of energy and/or resource use reduction resulting from the competition:

Lasting effects of competition: One of the awareness raising events for Recyclemania was a large trash sort for which students volunteered. This is now being done in some form each year.  This scale of a garbage sort garnered much interest from other universities and high schools and a model to draw attention to the amount of recyclable materials in the waste stream.  The trash sort this year provided information about organic material types and amounts for related to future composting pilots on campus. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbo5Ec1im3E

Additional Information: http://www.recyclemaniacs.org/university_detail08.asp?ID=1688

 

Third Competition:

 

Competition Overview

 

Competition Name: Beautiful U Day

Year Initiated:

Website: http://www.buday.umn.edu/

 

Frequency that competition is run: Once annually

 

Groups involved in coordinating the competition:

[  ]

 

Students

[  ]

 

Faculty

[X]

 

Staff

[  ]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, please describe.

 

Participants in the competition:

[X]

 

Students

[X]

 

Faculty

[X]

 

Staff

[X]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, describe:

 

Incentives for participation:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Cash

 

[  ]  

 

Non-monetary prizes

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

Goals of competition:

 

 

Describe:

[X]  

 

Energy conservation  

 

[X]  

 

Waste reduction

 

[X]  

 

Water conservation

 

[X]  

 

Other

 

Beautiful U Day has different focus areas and includes many different events - from getting rid of concrete to create more green space, to office clean out to showcasing  initiatives like "It All Adds Up" like


Percent of energy and/or resource use reduction resulting from the competition: In the program kick off, the U collected 6,190 pounds of used books, 4,648 pounds of electronics and 206 cell phones on Beautiful U Day in celebration of the It All Adds Up conservation program's expansion to include recycling.

Lasting effects of competition: Items will be donated to environmentally responsible recyclers like Worldwide Book Drive, Cell Phones for Soldiers and Asset Recovery Corporation.

Additional Information: http://facm.oit.umn.edu/news/features/2010/USERVICES_CONTENT_211583.htmlhttp://www.buday.umn.edu/RRR_details.html

 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS


61) Does your school have active student-run organizations devoted to sustainability efforts on campus?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide names of organizations, a brief description of each, and URLs for the organizations’ websites, if available:

Name

 

Description

 

URL

Active Energy Club

 

A group devoted to bringing together students of different disciplines with interests in energy in order to promote awareness about alternative/conservation technology and to provide and information and research base for furthering more energy efficient processes.

 

http://www.tc.umn.edu/~aec/

 

 

 

 

 

Bio-based Products Marketing and Management Student Association

 

This student group is open to all U of M students interested in the bio-products industry or in the Bio-based Products Marketing and Management major. The group focuses on networking with companies in our industry and building relationships with each other and BPMM alumni, striving to prepare members to positively impact the bio-based products industry by equipping them with a competitive edge in the studies of energy efficiency, sustainability, and renewable resources.

 

http://www.sua.umn.edu/groups/directory/show.php?id=2311

 

 

 

 

 

Campus Beyond Coal

 

The Sierra Student Coalition and Sierra Club are working to get the University of Minnesota to make a public commitment to move beyond coal as soon as feasibly possible. Beyond Coal is looking to take the University to that next step in being a sustainability leader by moving away from burning dirty coal.

 

http://www.sua.umn.edu/groups/directory/show.php?id=2472

 

 

 

 

 

Do It Green! U of M Chapter

 

The purpose of the Do It Green! U of M Chapter is to help the students of all majors and interests at the University of Minnesota expand their commitment to being green and living sustainably by promoting a healthy and green 'U.'

 

http://www.tc.umn.edu/~ewb/

 

 

 

 

 

Engineers Without Borders

 

The mission of Engineers Without Borders - University of Minnesota is to partner with disadvantaged communities around the world, and to improve their quality of life through implementation of engineered projects that prove environmentally and economically sustainable. Goals are achieved through cooperation with group members, fellow institutions, and mentors on the basis of commitment, persistence and concern for the recipients of the group’s efforts.

 

http://www.tc.umn.edu/~ewb/

 

 

 

 

 

EcoWatch

 

EcoWatch is a student organization at the University of Minnesota that works to expand the environmental dialog and engage students on campus environmental issues. It is a non-partisan group that focuses on campus outreach events and representing students on campus sustainability issues. Members also work with local, state, and national environmental and clean energy campaigns.

 

http://www.tc.umn.edu/~ecowatch/

 

 

 

 

 

Energy Efficiency Student Alliance (EESA)

 

The Enegy Efficiency Student Alliance (EESA) is comprised of the Active Energy Club (AEC), the Minnesota Public Interest Research Group (MPIRG), EcoWatch, and Green Biz at the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities. It is run by students who are passionate about energy use on campus!The Enegy Efficiency Student Alliance (EESA) is comprised of the Active Energy Club (AEC), the Minnesota Public Interest Research Group (MPIRG), EcoWatch, and Green Biz at the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities. It is run by students who are passionate about energy use on campus! The Power Police is a main project, with the involvement of Energy Management and the support of the University's It All Adds Up initiative.

 

http://www.tc.umn.edu/~aec/eesa.html

 

 

 

 

 

Greeks Going Green

 

The goal of 3G is to challenge Sororities and Fraternities each year to make at least one lifestyle change in each of their respective chapters to get them on track to living in the most environmentally efficient quarters and/or leading the most eco-efficient lifestyle they possibly can, given their resources.

 

http://www.sua.umn.edu/groups/directory/show.php?id=2259

 

 

 

 

 

Green Biz

 

Green Biz is an official Carlson School of Management (CSOM) student organization (open to all U of M majors) with the mission of reducing CSOM's environmental footprint and promote ecological sustainability in the global business community.

 

http://www.sua.umn.edu/groups/directory/show.php?id=2349

 

 

 

 

 

Greenlight

 

Based in the College of Design, Greenlight works to inspire future design leaders to shape our physical environments in an ecologically innovative, healthy and sustainable way. The mission of the group is to: reduce personal and community ecological footprints; raise awareness of ecological and social sustainability issues within the college and the broader community; serve as a resource for innovative, sustainable design solutions; and inspire future design leaders to address ecological issues through their work.

 

http://greenlight.design.umn.edu/index.html

 

 

 

 

 

Minnesota Public Interest Research Group (MPIRG)

 

MPIRG is a grass roots, student-directed, non-partisan organization that empowers and trains students and engages the community to take collective action in the public interest statewide. Their Sustainability Task Force in the Twin Cities is making changes on and off campus, teaming up with other student groups to make buildings across campus more energy efficient. MPIRG organizes Campus Wars, a competition between campus dorms to reduce energy consumption. The task force is also working on Moving Forward Minnesota to increase the availability of mass transit and bike lanes for commuters. Finally, the students are working with the city of Minneapolis to create a business recycling program.

 

http://mpirg.org/students/U-M_twin_cities.html

 

 

 

 

 

Solar Decathlon

 

A group of pioneers in renewable energy, Solar Decathlon at UMN is a group of students, staff, faculty, and greater community members interested in volunteering their knowledge, skills, and time to the creation of the University of Minnesota’s Solar Decathlon entry. Members of the group coordinate activities related to the design, marketing, and construction of a solar energy-powered house to compete in the Solar Decathlon in Washington DC. The group brings together students, faculty, staff, and community members from various disciplines and fields in a collaborative working environment.

 

http://blog.lib.umn.edu/solard/news/

 

 

 

 

 

Students for New Urbanism

 

The mission of this group is to have a community of students present, explore, discuss, and apply the ideas of New Urbanism and other "good urbanism" theories. Topics of focus include planned walkable neighborhoods, good public transportation, and how these sustainable solutions apply to our communities.

 

http://www.sua.umn.edu/groups/directory/show.php?id=1086

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. Green Building Council Student Chapter

 

The USGBC student chapter promotes public understanding and appreciation of the challenges and solutions posed by improved sustainable building practice, specifically those established by Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) guidelines.

 

http://www.sua.umn.edu/groups/directory/show.php?id=2321

 

 

 

 

 

What’s Up in Sustainable Agriculture? (WUSA)

 

Each year, in partnership with the What's Up in Sustainable Agriculture Student Group, the Minnesota Institute for Sustainable Agriculture (MISA) sponsors a seminar series on campus called What's Up in Sustainable Agriculture (WUSA). Most seminars are informal gatherings open to anyone within and outside of the University. WUSA is a group of students, staff, faculty and community members that meet weekly for a brown bag lunch to talk about current topics in sustainable agriculture with other professionals in the field.

 

http://www.misa.umn.edu/WUSA_Student_Group.html

 

 

 

 

 

Cornercopia

 

We are a student driven and run certified organic farm on the St. Paul Campus at the University of Minnesota that grows 100+ varieties of fruits and vegetables.

 

http://sof.cfans.umn.edu/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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TRANSPORTATION

 

CAMPUS MOTOR FLEET

 

62) How many vehicles are in your institution's fleet?
The fleet includes all vehicles owned by the campus such as cars, trucks, and carts. It does not include lawnmowers or other off-road vehicles.

550

 

63) Please indicate which of the following alternative-fuel vehicles are included in your fleet. Check all that apply. Please list the number of vehicles for each class.

 

 

 

 

Number of vehicles

[  ]  

 

100 percent electric

 

[  ]  

 

Diesel-electric hybrid

 

[X]  

 

Fueled with B20 or higher biofuel for more than 6 months of the year

 

50

[X]  

 

Fueled with E85 or higher ethanol for more than 6 months of the year    

 

100

[X]  

 

Gasoline-electric hybrid

 

47 + 2 buses

[  ]  

 

Hydrogen fueled

 

[  ]  

 

Plug-in hybrid

 

[X]  

 

Other. Please describe:

50 diesel vehicles.  All diesel vehicles use B20.  Due to cold weather B20 used for 6 months of the year, B10 for 3 months and B5 for three months. 25,000 gallons of B20, 13,000 gallons of B10 and 12,000 gallons of B5 pumped.100 E85 vehicles.  All E85 vehicles use E85. E70 used during the five coldest months.  28,400 gallons of E85/E70 pumped.47 + 2 hybrid buses

 

 


COMMUTE MODAL SPLIT

64) What portion of the student body commutes via transportation methods other than single-occupancy vehicles (e.g., bicycle, walking, public transportation, carpool/vanpool)?

68%

 

If data are available, please provide the percentage of students who commute by each of the following means.

 

 

 

Percentage

Bicycle

 

10%

Carpool/vanpool

 

8%

Public transit

 

27%

Single-occupancy vehicle    

 

32%

Walking

 

23%

 

65) What percentage of employees commute via transportation methods other than single-occupancy vehicles (e.g., bicycle, walking, public transportation, carpool)?

68%

 

If data are available, please provide the percentage of employees who commute by each of the following means.

 

 

 

Percentage

Bicycle

 

10%

Carpool/vanpool

 

8%

Public transit

 

27%

Single-occupancy vehicle    

 

32%

Walking

 

23%

 

LOCAL TRANSPORTATION ALTERNATIVES

 

66) Does your school offer incentives for carpooling to faculty, staff and/or students? Check all that apply, and describe below.

[  ] No

[X] Yes, to faculty and staff

[X] Yes, to students

 

Description: http://www1.umn.edu/pts/files/FactsFigures.pdf


Please check and describe carpooling incentives provided for faculty/staff . Check all that apply.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[X]  

 

Carpool matching

 

Matching through Zimride.

[  ]  

 

Financial remuneration  

 

[X]  

 

Preferential parking

 

Carpool pays $2.50 a day, normal rate $3.75

[  ]  

 

Other

 


Please check and describe carpooling incentives provided for students . Check all that apply.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[X]  

 

Carpool matching

 

Matching through Zimride.

[  ]  

 

Financial remuneration  

 

[X]  

 

Preferential parking

 

Carpool pays $2.50 a day, normal rate $3.75

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

67) Does your school offer subsidies for the use of public transportation?

 

Deeply discounted public transportation pass for staff and students. Unlimited rides for semester for students with a cost of $97, Unlimited rides for a month for  $74 for staff and faculty.

 

 

 

 

Eligible community members:

 

Size of the discount (as a percent of full price)

[X]  

 

Faculty

 

Up to 50%

[X]  

 

Staff

 

Up to 50%

[X]  

 

Students   

 

Up to 71%


[X] Check here if subsidy takes the form of pre-tax payroll deduction. Please describe below:

Yes monthly

 

68) Does your school provide free transportation around campus?

 

The Twin Cities is spread over three areas - East Bank, West Bank and St Paul - that are up to six miles apart. There are five bus routes (served by a fleet that includes two hybrid buses) that are free of charge to all students, staff, faculty and campus visitors that handle 4,000,000 riders annually.

 

 

69) Does your school operate a free transportation shuttle to local off-campus destinations?

 

 

 If not applicable, please explain: Public transportation is readily available at our urban campus.  Bus pass program is highly successful resulting in 21,873 U-Passes (Students) and 2,232 Metropasses (staff/faculty) sold and approximately 500,000 rides taken in the 2008/2009 timeframe.

 

BICYCLE PROGRAM

 

70) Does your school offer a bicycle sharing/rental program?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.


Year created: 2010
Number of bikes available: 700 in system, 90 on campus
Usage fee per hour: $1.50 ( first 30 minutes free)
Usage fee per day: $5

 

Annual membership fee for students:  $60

Annual membership fee for faculty, staff, and administrators: $60

Other annual membership fee: 

 

Description: The school is partnering with City of Minneapolis and NiceRide MN. City combined 65 stations (10 on campus) with access to 700 (~90 campus)bikes.  http://www.niceridemn.org/

 

71) Does your school offer bicycle repair services?

No

 

If yes, please provide details below:


Year created:
Service fee:
Description:

 

CAR SHARING PROGRAM

 

72) Does your school partner with a car-sharing program?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

Year created:
Total number of vehicles:  10
Number of hybrid vehicles:
Usage fee per hour: $8
Usage fee per day: $66


Annual membership fee for students:  $35

Annual membership fee for faculty, staff, and administrators:  $35

Other annual membership fee: 

 

Description: In partnership with Zipcar.  http://www1.umn.edu/pts/zipcar.html

 

PLANNING

 

73) Does your school have policies that support a pedestrian-friendly or bike-friendly campus (e.g., in the school's master plan, a policy prohibiting vehicles from the center of campus)?

Bicycling and pedestrian travel are both addressed in the University’s Master Plan and are expected to continue to grow as significant and critical modes of travel.  http://cppm.umn.edu/master_planning.html

 

74) Do you offer the option of a condensed work week or telecommuting to at least ten percent of full-time employees? For each option, please indicate who is eligible.

 

 

 

 

Employees eligible

 

Description:

[X]  

 

Telecommuting

 

All employees eligible, subject to supervisor approval.

 

http://www1.umn.edu/ohr/worklife/flexwork/index.html

[X]  

 

Condensed work week  

 

All employees eligible, subject to supervisor approval.

 

http://www1.umn.edu/ohr/worklife/flexwork/index.html

 

Additional comments:


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STATISTICS

 

75) Campus setting:        

Urban

 

76) Total number of buildings on campus:

268

 

77) Combined gross square footage of all buildings on campus: 

22,219,926

 

78) Full-time enrollment (undergraduate + graduate, headcount at start of academic year): 

38,094

 

79) Part-time enrollment (undergraduate + graduate, headcount at start of academic year): 

13,565

 

80) Percent of full-time students that live on campus: 

Not available.  However, appx 75% freshmen live on campus;  Appx 30% students, staff, faculty combined live within two miles of campus.

 

 

OTHER AREAS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGAGEMENT

Question 81 is for informational purposes only; responses will NOT be included in the Report Card evaluation process.

 

81) Please check all items that apply to your institution:

 

 

 

 

 

Description (optional)

[X]    

 

Campus garden or farm

 

 

 

 

 

 

[  ]    

 

Disposable water bottle ban

 

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Environmental science/studies major (undergraduate-level)

 

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Environmental science/studies minor or concentration (undergraduate-level)   

 

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Graduate-level environmental studies program (graduate-level)

 

 

 

 

 

 

[  ]    

 

Graduate-level sustainability studies program

 

In development

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Outdoors club

 

 

 

 

 

 

[X]     

 

Participation in Recyclemania

 

 

 

 

 

 

[  ]    

 

Single-stream recycling

 

Recycling program in place over 25 years.  Higher value is given regional for segregated materials.

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Student trustee position

 

The Board of Regents in the governing body of the University.  One member of the board must be a University student at the time of election.  In addition, there are seven student representatives to the Board.  http://www1.umn.edu/regents/regents.html

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Sustainability major, minor or concentration (undergraduate-level)   

 

http://sustainabilitystudies.umn.edu/

 


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